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1 hour ago, Zonker said:

I understand about scaling to the boat size. I was looking at the profile and said "there isn't much draft" - until I zoomed in and read the actual draft. Its a big boat.

Maybe add an ironing board stored in the bulkhead and dedicated heated towel locker for the owner.

Make sure the ironing board is gimbaled or you’ll get wrinkles when the boat heels.

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Sorry for the drift but when someone mentioned ironing boards..... when there is some ceremonial occasion on a Navy ship (an all-too-frequent event when some admiral decides he needs to get out from his office), everyone is expected to show up with shiny boots and ironed clothes.  So the idea of allocating resources to ironing onboard a big boat isn't unusual.  

On a Navy ship, no, not unusual.  Probably not needed on a cruising boat where the 'dress of the day' is a t-shirt and shorts.  :)

 

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9 hours ago, socalrider said:

I think he misspelled “Jean Berret”

Frers designed some of the bigger Firsts of that era, no?

Though, in my opinion an argument could be made to include one of the Jean Berret Firsts on this list. I certainly liked one enough to buy one.

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1 hour ago, freewheelin said:

Frers designed some of the bigger Firsts of that era, no?

Though, in my opinion an argument could be made to include one of the Jean Berret Firsts on this list. I certainly liked one enough to buy one.

Yeah, that was just my attempt at a joke.  I have a 405, hence the Berret plug.  Frers did the First 42 and the 435 I think too as well as others.  But there's an astonishing range of really good Firsts in the 38-45' range from 1984-1989- might be the reason why there's not an obvious single iconic choice to put on the list.  Offhand, there's the 375, 38, 405 (all Berret), and 42, 435, 456 (all Frers).  So six models from 38-45' in five years.  

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31 minutes ago, socalrider said:

Yeah, that was just my attempt at a joke.  I have a 405, hence the Berret plug.  Frers did the First 42 and the 435 I think too as well as others.  But there's an astonishing range of really good Firsts in the 38-45' range from 1984-1989- might be the reason why there's not an obvious single iconic choice to put on the list.  Offhand, there's the 375, 38, 405 (all Berret), and 42, 435, 456 (all Frers).  So six models from 38-45' in five years.  

the 305, 325 and 345 as well on the mid-size boats are all Jean Berret. First 305 is my ride. It really is a great racer/cruiser, and the design is fantastic (as long as you are 5'10" or shorter).

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20 hours ago, Zonker said:

I understand about scaling to the boat size. I was looking at the profile and said "there isn't much draft" - until I zoomed in and read the actual draft. Its a big boat.

Maybe add an ironing board stored in the bulkhead and dedicated heated towel locker for the owner.

Ironing board?!?  IRONING BOARD???  Sailors don't iron.

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The crew will. There are 2 crew berths in the bow with a separate companionway ladder. And opposite the laundry area there is what looks like the paid captain's cabin. But it's not! It's a "clinic" - always read the notes on the drawing folks!

There was a BC eye doctor who had an exam area in his boat. He made a comfortable living giving eye exams to the isolated First Nations villages up the north coast. All was well with the good doctor until the provincial medical plan realised he was giving 60 or 100 eye exams in a day....Just like the lawyers billing 30 hours in a day you have to watch the paperwork.

Back to to 85' sailboat.  Might as well use a clothing press instead. I saw one on a megayacht and it seemed very fast to press the uniforms. 

 

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50 minutes ago, Zonker said:

The crew will. There are 2 crew berths in the bow with a separate companionway ladder. And opposite the laundry area there is what looks like the paid captain's cabin. But it's not! It's a "clinic" - always read the notes on the drawing folks!

There was a BC eye doctor who had an exam area in his boat. He made a comfortable living giving eye exams to the isolated First Nations villages up the north coast. All was well with the good doctor until the provincial medical plan realised he was giving 60 or 100 eye exams in a day....Just like the lawyers billing 30 hours in a day you have to watch the paperwork.

Back to to 85' sailboat.  Might as well use a clothing press instead. I saw one on a megayacht and it seemed very fast to press the uniforms. 

 

Hi Zonk,

   You and Bob better figure out where those ironing boards are going as I'm closing in on the crew quarters and I'm not seeing room in that separate fwd cabin. Starting to come together though. Still lots of major interior spaces to rough in before ironing boards are an issue...

 

image.thumb.png.b1bfbabf0c8ab3e0d984ec84dd0c453b.png

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9 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

Hi Zonk,

   You and Bob better figure out where those ironing boards are going as I'm closing in on the crew quarters and I'm not seeing room in that separate fwd cabin. Starting to come together though. Still lots of major interior spaces to rough in before ironing boards are an issue...

 

image.thumb.png.b1bfbabf0c8ab3e0d984ec84dd0c453b.png

Now you've gone and given away the client!  Had no idea he moonlighted as a composites engineer!

image.thumb.png.67543e8a4a5235e5fd0137131c4a711b.png

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2 minutes ago, socalrider said:

Now you've gone and given away the client!  Had no idea he moonlighted as a composites engineer!

image.thumb.png.67543e8a4a5235e5fd0137131c4a711b.png

Ha socal! I knew there was something familiar about that guy I was using in my model. Bob is going to love that.

Perfect match on the posture!

image.thumb.png.172d430096e2d0ce00a4dbae6b3f5b22.png

 

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7 hours ago, socalrider said:

Yeah, that was just my attempt at a joke.  I have a 405, hence the Berret plug.  Frers did the First 42 and the 435 I think too as well as others.  But there's an astonishing range of really good Firsts in the 38-45' range from 1984-1989- might be the reason why there's not an obvious single iconic choice to put on the list.  Offhand, there's the 375, 38, 405 (all Berret), and 42, 435, 456 (all Frers).  So six models from 38-45' in five years.  

IMO the Frers First 42 from the early 80's is one of the best looking boats ever.

Period.

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10 hours ago, paps49 said:

That or a legendary spliff.

The two are not exclusive. It's said JM Keynes was a fan of the Devil's Lettuce.

Turns out on further research Mick never finished his finance degree at LSE, choosing to bank money rather than study it (est. net worth $360m USD). We can imagine him in CFA mode on the tour bus, c. 1975: "Keefy, man -- by all means heroin, yes ... but think about down the road. What are you going to live on when you are seventy, Keef? Do you still want to be out here touring, shaking your arse  for the few pensioners who care? Let's talk about annuities."

 

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On 1/8/2020 at 11:45 PM, Diarmuid said:
On 1/8/2020 at 6:19 PM, socalrider said:

Now you've gone and given away the client!  Had no idea he moonlighted as a composites engineer!

image.thumb.png.67543e8a4a5235e5fd0137131c4a711b.png

He does hold a degree in Economics.

On 1/9/2020 at 2:41 AM, paps49 said:

 

That or a legendary spliff.

 

Are his pants an example of "composite engineering?" Looks like grandma's table cloth.... ummm, this is the mocking thread, right?

- DSK

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3 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

 

Are his pants an example of "composite engineering?" Looks like grandma's table cloth.... ummm, this is the mocking thread, right?

- DSK

I watched part of The Rutles: All You Need is Cash last night. Mick was brilliantly funny in that.

 

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On 1/8/2020 at 7:22 PM, SloopJonB said:

IMO the Frers First 42 from the early 80's is one of the best looking boats ever.

Period.

I agree.  Great looking boats.  Are at an age (and market price) where a refit/update can be viable economically.

I also like the Farr designed Firsts - the .7 series.  Not often mentioned as cruising boats, but they are comfortable and fast. 

 

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  • 5 months later...

Hello Bob,  I have started the preliminary search for a blue water sailboat and am leaning toward buying a used Tayana 37. Since you know how they were built better than anyone, can you tell us about the hull construction and fiberglass thickness on the 70's and 80's  37's?  They are 30 plus years old now. What are your thoughts on the lifespan and strength of these at the age they are now and safety of taking them on passages?  Thanks! 

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2 hours ago, Keith841 said:

Hello Bob,  I have started the preliminary search for a blue water sailboat and am leaning toward buying a used Tayana 37. Since you know how they were built better than anyone, can you tell us about the hull construction and fiberglass thickness on the 70's and 80's  37's?  They are 30 plus years old now. What are your thoughts on the lifespan and strength of these at the age they are now and safety of taking them on passages?  Thanks! 

Methinks you will gt a quicker and more complete response by going to his website and following the instructions there for consultations.

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I look at those drawings, Bob and I just.....can't process.  in all my sailing days, the biggest "modern" sailboat I've ever been on is an Bianca 42.  I was on that boat about 5-6 times and the next biggest thing I've ever actually sailed on is an Express 37.    I went out on  a Brigantine, "Rendezvous" which is much larger of course, but wood so headroom is about 5' 5" but somehow that doesn't count. Besides, that was only twice.   I look at a boat the size of what you're drawing and I just wonder...what would I do with it all? I think of the huge engine and think...."how would I maintain that?".  I look at the sailplan and think..."How could I possibly deal with that?"  ...and..."This would cost MILLIONS."

 

I just have to think, what do I need?   I need the boat to be big enough that it's reasonably dry in any sort of at least halfway decent weather. I need a place to sleep. I need a place to cook my oatmeal in the morning. I need a place to spread out a chart and think about where I'm going. I need a place to poop.  I need the rig to be small enough that if I have to, I can haul down an entire sail by hand, by myself when it's "pretty windy".  For some other people, they probably add in a few other things; you, for example need a place to sit and play your guitar.  If I'm "out there" with a partner, which I never will be....but if I was, then WE need a place to sleep in addition to "ME" needing a place to sleep...whoever is on the off-watch.  I need a few square feet to call my own, and she needs a few square feet to call her own.

 

I'm glad, for you, that you have clients who want things like what you've shown us.  After all, it's how you make a living,  but I just look at the drawings and I dunno...**nothing happens**.   I don't "get"  wanting or needing a cruising boat THAT big.

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