Jump to content

What Upgrades Did You Make Just After Buying Your Boat?


Recommended Posts

I pulled out all the hardware and inspected the holes for cracks, i replaced all the running rigging, and I repainted the deck. I ended up moving some of the hardware around for better leads, smarter cleating angles, etc; I kept stuff I wouldn’t use like the aft hiking straps and the bicycle cup holders off. I didn’t do a great job prepping for paint though; most of it has a bit of orange peel and it’s rubbed through in some places. Overall everything made sense and made me able to sail the boat better. Granted this is a 14’ dinghy so it wasn’t an incredibly arduous process; if you bought a bluewater cruising boat you might want to pick your battles

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Brand new sails (North), got the bottom right (Pettit Vivid white with graphite), new instruments (B&G), new running rigging (Marlow). I then proceeded to cheat like a motherfucker to confirm suspicions that I cheat.

Oh yeah, I had all new interior and cockpit cushions made, cockpit awning too. Sounds weird, but we camped on the Tiger quite a bit for a summer with the ex. Have already spent a weekend on the boat with the future ex, and looking forward to a great summer with her in 2020. Pretty sure 2020 will be my last year with the mighty A4... As for women, who knows!!

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Right off the bat: new cushions, new upholstery; new Raritan PHII toilet, new custom holding tank, new hoses; new ST winches all round, new clutches, new deck layout. Threw away CB radio and useless tubular radar reflector.

Second rush of upgrades: new traveler; new windows, new hatches all round; autopilot; high-output alternator and matching smart regulator; new VHF radio, new CD deck/radio; new prop shaft, dripless shaft seal and Max Prop; a bunch of other things I can't remember right now.

Absolutely would do it again.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Jules said:

What upgrades and/or improvements did you make right after buying your boat? 

If you were to do it all over again, would you do the same thing?

A timely topic as I'm at stage one. I bought my boat on Black Friday, November 29th, and had three days before the first snowstorm hit to clean out the interior, stow the sails and cushions, then get the mast off the deck. Only upgrade at that time was a new tarp to cover the deck openings.

That's about all the physical work I'll be doing on it until March.

My goal is to have as handy of a boat to single-hand day sail by opening day next season.

Major items:

I will be replacing all the running rigging and at least the wire lower shrouds.

Looking for a used tiller pilot.

Looking to upgrade my short shaft kicker O/B.

Have the sails cleaned.

I bought a pair of Lewmar 14ST self tailers from Oklahoma off of FB Marketplace to replace the #6 non-tailing winces on it now.

As 1.5Thumbs said it's all sort of relative to the size of the boat and your intended use. The condition of the boat in the first place is huge.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Editor said:

Brand new sails (North), got the bottom right (Pettit Vivid white with graphite), new instruments (B&G), new running rigging (Marlow). I then proceeded to cheat like a motherfucker to confirm suspicions that I cheat.

Oh yeah, I had all new interior and cockpit cushions made, cockpit awning too. Sounds weird, but we camped on the Tiger quite a bit for a summer with the ex. Have already spent a weekend on the boat with the future ex, and looking forward to a great summer with her in 2020. Pretty sure 2020 will be my last year with the mighty A4... As for women, who knows!!

^^^^^

It's all sort of relative to the size of your budget too...

P.S.    I've used Petit Vivid before and really liked it. I thought I was the only one. Not familiar with the graphite part. Is that something I might want to learn more about? 

Link to post
Share on other sites

1st: mainsheet blocks, mainsheet, and auto-tacking traveler car. 

2nd: primaries.

3rd: Halyard sheaves.

4th: Halyard and other cabin top winches.

jib/genoa fairleads as necessary.

preheat over to 350 and bake for 15 years until done.

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Monkey Butler said:

^^^^^

It's all sort of relative to the size of your budget too...

P.S.    I've used Petit Vivid before and really liked it. I thought I was the only one. Not familiar with the graphite part. Is that something I might want to learn more about? 

It is indeed all about the size of the wallet! So I fucking love white bottoms (Asian too if you must know!), and the vivid white is good, but as you know, soft as hell, and the paint doesn't last all that long. Adding graphite turns the color to light gray - also awesome - but it hardens the finish so the shit doesn't come off so fast. Adds a year to the bottom, and is likely faster.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Jules said:

What upgrades and/or improvements did you make right after buying your boat? 

If you were to do it all over again, would you do the same thing?

We were leaving for a month of cruising a week after buying the boat so we concentrated on stove/propane, working (composting) head, autopilot and swim ladder.  Plus a bow cleat so we could anchor. 
 

All were good investments and we started spending the sail budget that fall.  One of our activities while cruising was to try out all of our sails and note condition. 
 

I also overhauled winches and cleaned everything during that cruise. And we had our friends come meet us in the middle and raced the boat for the first time. That was a great summer. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, Editor said:

It is indeed all about the size of the wallet! So I fucking love white bottoms (Asian too if you must know!), and the vivid white is good, but as you know, soft as hell, and the paint doesn't last all that long. Adding graphite turns the color to light gray - also awesome - but it hardens the finish so the shit doesn't come off so fast. Adds a year to the bottom, and is likely faster.

One does learn to scrub the waterline with about the same vigor as a posterior wiping.

I'm shooting for a really light minty green so they gray might get hidden. Is this just hardware store graphite or do I need something marine grade that can empty my piggy bank quicker?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I asked because I was beginning to think we were throwing too much in that we might regret later.  So far (not including regular maintenance items)

  • All new B&G instruments
  • Replace pedestal guard with angled one & added instrument pod
  • New stereo that connects to MFD & new cockpit speakers
  • Replace head hoses with $30/ft Poly Shield X
  • New 12K BTU AC unit
  • New battery charger/conditioner
  • New cockpit hardware & table
  • Replace single speed 16 halyard winch Andersen 28 2-speed
  • Replace (2) Chinese cabintop winches with Lewmar ST

And we're working on

  • New cushions for the cockpit and reupholstering the cabin cushions
  • Replacing the headsail
  • Replacing old wood on the deck

We will easily hit that 50% of purchase price in post purchase expenses so often cited

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh yeah...I forgot the power windlass, new 35 lb Delta anchor, new chain (100' of 1/4" G-43) and new rode (300' of 1/2" nylon) in the first upgrade.

Because I worked for West at the time I got everything at staff pricing or better, so something like 50-60% of retail.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Monkey Butler said:

One does learn to scrub the waterline with about the same vigor as a posterior wiping.

I'm shooting for a really light minty green so they gray might get hidden. Is this just hardware store graphite or do I need something marine grade that can empty my piggy bank quicker?

check with your boatyard and even the paint manufacturer. ask the smart guys.

Link to post
Share on other sites

New main and genoa, New primaries, new genoa lead cars (boat didn't have any).  

Then, converted to Forte deck mounted retractable sprit adding 3.1feet to J. Of course, a new chute.

Then, replaced rudder with high aspect blade from OEM (Foss, Newport CA).

Finally, added Isotherm SP refer unit to the ice box.  Love it! 

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Peenstone said:

 Then, converted to Forte deck mounted retractable sprit adding 3.1feet to J. Of course, a new chute.

Then, replaced rudder with high aspect blade from OEM (Foss, Newport CA).

I assume you got a rating hit for doing so.  You did report the modifications to your rating authority, right?

Link to post
Share on other sites

1st year: VHF, AIS, halyards and running rigging, mainsheet blocks, mast rehab (sheaves, wiring, lights), sail check-ups (and minor recuts)

2nd year: bottom job (strip, barrier coat, paint) battery charger, engine-water pumps, sea-water strainer, spinnaker

3rd year: batteries, new cabin-top/halyard winches and stoppers, exterior covers, hatch seals, cockpit speakers

4th year: stereo, main-salon cushions, replumbed head (new pump), minor storage reconfiguration

Next year: re-do of whole bilge-pump system (out with the Rule, in with the diaphragm + water-witch), plus probably some rewiring, maaaaaybe a new main

Every year: routine maintenance (oil change, fuel-filters, heat-exchanger zincs, shaft zincs, trans fluid, etc, etc, etc, etc, etc)

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

1st: mainsheet blocks, mainsheet, and auto-tacking traveler car. 

2nd: primaries.

3rd: Halyard sheaves.

4th: Halyard and other cabin top winches.

jib/genoa fairleads as necessary.

preheat oven to 350 and bake for 15 years until done.

 

I ordered a new suit of sails for the 35 when I bought the boat, so they were parked safely in my basement until we started racing one-design. In the meantime, we did wed nights with the inventory that came with the boat until we blew them all up and had gotten a feel for the boat. all the old electronics worked with a little tlc on the connectors so didn't have to pour money into that.

The price of the new sail inventory just about matched what I paid for the boat. and managed to get by on (average)  one new sail a year since.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Great thread.

Isn't the answer largely dependent on how long you intend to keep the boat?  If you feel you will have it for the foreseeable future, there's nothing wrong with spending lots immediately.  If it's only an interim boat for a few years, I'd try to get by.

Me, looking for something in the 30' range just to be the occasional weekend cottage, get me on the water a couple of times a week, and maybe a single 10-day cruise each summer.  I'd love to find an existing boat/partner, but if not, I want to buy the 30' boat that someone tricked out and loved. I have 10yrs of ownership left in me and know how to care for and fix things but that's not my passion.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I know where Cal is coming from here. With our C&C 29, we delayed a lot of the things we wanted to do because we knew it was a stepping stone. We ended up doing a lot of them in the last year or two of our 9-year ownership. When we got the 35 we made the decision to do all the things we wanted to do as soon as possible so we could enjoy them during our ownership. That's worked out well so far, we're headed into year 14 and we have had a much more enjoyable time because all those things were done. No point doing them just for the next owner, you may as well enjoy them first. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I got a fairly used-up Santa Cruz 27 in 1995.

I immediately took off all the '70s mini-ocean-racer deck hardware (winch farm), filled the holes with epoxy, and gave the boat a proper deck layout, the goal being that every control was accessible without pulling anyone away from their proper position, light wind or heavy, upwind or down. Went from 7 winches to 4. All new blocks, standing rigging, and running rigging. Sanded down all the fine Bruynzeel and put on a few coats of varnish. Bought new white sails. The inherited .6 poly AP chute was gorgeous and served me well.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems like the crew got busy:

image.png.51404fcde6a79bce271966c4de8d7fd0.png

image.png.9125ffa2a9af1eccaa4bc894cdc4d30e.png

image.png.2fd319016e915070433185b9f3216a7c.png

image.png.12f047b6b46bde18861a1aaaf87d9fc7.png 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Immediately after purchase & prior to 600 nm delivery to new home port in dead of winter replaced lashing on lifelines, fitted new AIS /DSC VHF, B&G Vulcan 7, led volt meters & consequently a new 120 amp battery, Tiller pilot, new shitter, fusion stereo & speakers & new led nav lights. Replaced interior lighting with LEDs. Also downloaded Navionics & Cmap. Got home without a drama (apart from weather breaks & time) Cheers

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, PaulinVictoria said:

Put on some Andersen ST primaries. Wish I'd gone a size bigger.

These are good winches.

I bought a mid-70s mid-20ft-er production racer-cruiser and did a small amount of work in rebuilding the deck, new deck layout & hardware, new running rigging (this added up); and the crowning glory that made it all work so well was the 2-speed Andersen ST winches on the cabin top. One of my goals was to sail the boat with my father, he could sit in the companionway and handle everything except steering easily. I also raced the boat with my wife and friends, had a great time with it and did fairly well.

FB- Doug

Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:
4 hours ago, PaulinVictoria said:

Put on some Andersen ST primaries. Wish I'd gone a size bigger.

These are good winches.

I bought a mid-70s mid-20ft-er production racer-cruiser and did a small amount of work in rebuilding the deck, new deck layout & hardware, new running rigging (this added up); and the crowning glory that made it all work so well was the 2-speed Andersen ST winches on the cabin top. One of my goals was to sail the boat with my father, he could sit in the companionway and handle everything except steering easily. I also raced the boat with my wife and friends, had a great time with it and did fairly well.

I'm impressed with the Andersen we just bought.  I just picked up their 28 ST 2-speed along with a couple Lewmar 16 CST winches from Defender.  The Andersen was a closeout and the Lewmars were display models, though they looked like the boxes had never been opened. 

Comparing the two just turning them by hand, you could feel the difference in quality.   The 28 replaced a 16 ST and serve the main and genoa halyards.  I figured having a 2-speed would also come in handy when going up in the bosun's chair.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Let's see:

New non skid on entire deck and cockpit sole- gelcoat /cabosil.(with added sand from 40 knot breeze, and ashes from Thomas fire in hills.)  All new halyards- vectran or dyneema with  polyester covers.  New blocks everywhere.  New genoa tracks.  2 new Harken winches.  New cam cleats.  Removed bulkhead compass that had no fluid,  put inspection port in hole, added Tactick compass to mast.  5 new sails- three from Deke and Gary in Ventura, one from Santa Cruz, one China sail.  Replaced trailer tongue and axle that had multiple rusted through areas, also replaced hubs and bearings and brakes.  Added a Velocitek Speedpuck as the knot meter reads about three knots fast.  Replaced all the sheaves in the mast.  Replaced all standing rigging.  I think that's all I had to do.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/21/2019 at 3:24 PM, axolotl said:

I assume you got a rating hit for doing so.  You did report the modifications to your rating authority, right?

Of course. 3 sec/ mi for each, the rudder hit ultimately got eliminated.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Right after?  Still working on the endless project known as a sailboat

diesel forced air heater

Replumbed the head to add a macerator with all new hoses

added cruising main

added racing high wind jib #3

replaced connections on running lights

replaced thermostat on refrigerator 

Added canvas covers for wheel, cabin top, winches, and Engine instruments 

serviced the engine

bottom paint

zincs

That’s all I can think of.  Does it ever end? Now I am trying to get all the safety gear for doing the Van Isle.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

C&C 29, new #1,#3, main , 

rebeded hatches, added boomkicker, new stereo, new VHF, new intstruments, running rigging and sheets, stove replaced, icebox cover and stove cover remade, dodger and main cover restitched and new windows in dodger, new sliding companionway hatch, probably some stuff i missed

best was new flexfold prop, really did change the way the boat behaved under power.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Shit that was five years ago

year 1: new head new main new rod rigging ( previously purchased by past owner but never installed ) new halyards new sheets new radio new vhf

year 2: new Genoa ,new cabin cushions new tiller. Bottom job 

year 3: new spinnaker recore deck 

year 4 new b&g electronics new fusion radio new canvas new running lights 

year 5( this year). New jib, new interior lights , rebed keel, paint cockpit, ais, 

Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, Bull City said:

The one thing I didn't do, and should have done, and was recommended to do, was a bottom job, as in barrier coat. It was an expensive omission. Sheer stupidity.

Bull!

I thought you had learned to follow my instructions.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

All new electronics.  New Reverse Air.  New freshwater electric toilets.  Bottom job. A2.  Yes, I would have done the same if I were to do all over again.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Followed all the recommendations from the surveyor on the old, old boat.  With my recently-acquired "new" old boat it will be rudder bearings, new epoxy bottom, r&r all deck hardware and re-bed, new main bulkhead and probably the rest of the plywood on the inside.  Most the running rigging looks suspect so it will probably be replaced too.

Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, Bull City said:

You and Mrs. Bull would have much to talk about.

Are you saying that at your age you STILL haven't learned to do what you are told by SWMBO? :o

Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Are you saying that at your age you STILL haven't learned to do what you are told by SWMBO? :o

I'm afraid so. I was always a little rebellious and stubborn.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, long list:

bottom job

major engine repair, alternator, new battery splitter for the house bank, firefly batteries, Xantrex monitor

stereo

vhf with remote

new batt charger

all new running rigging, was able to save most of the tylaskas using vinegar. used mostly dyneema core and stripped where possible

Then the engine shit the bed,ripped it out and replaced, new tranny, rebuild the v drive, likely new prop to handle the  higher torque

painted the bilges

refinishjng the floorboard with nonskid

2nd bottom job next week, dropping the rudder to check the bearing

then the rig is going to get a full review, new standing rigging, maybe spreaders, new LED lights and lighter cables

new main, new A2,3 &4

then all new LED inside

replacing the bunk canvas

repaint the deck

and then check the list for offshore stuff.

 

writing the list tires me out

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

What's your window for "Just after?"

When I bought the boat I replaced all the through hulls and made a few repairs as suggested by the surveyor.

On the delivery from Florida to RI we ripped the clew out of the main - it hadn't been full furled and the cloth had UV degradation. Before the first season I had a new main.

Over the years I replaced all the instruments, new autopilots, more sails, etc. etc. but that wasn't right off.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s a perpetual project.

1979 J30 - previous owner had done deck core work, rebuilt engine and Awlgripped top to bottom as well as numerous other fixes/upgrades (thank you Mark!)

Year 1- upgraded all lighting  to LED, added shore power and charger. Swapped out fuse panel for breaker panel, Facnor Flatdeck furler  

Year 2 -new radio, new throttle control, magnetic compass, .5 oz chute

Year 3 - new chart plotter, upgrades on ALL safety gear (required for long distance race on Lake Michigan), new galley gas cooktop

Year 4 - all new Garmin instruments, gas grill 

Year5 (this winter) - new Quantum Fusion main and light #1. Itching for the season to get here to see what we got. 

Oh yeah, and CONTINUOUS maintenance on an older boat.

Taking really good care of a boat pays off. Better performance, more fun to be on with family and friends, SAFER!!!, headaches are few and far between when you pay attention to the boat.

 

 

 

0E97A6AB-8575-433E-95AD-B16B93778548.jpeg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

There was a lot of work that went into just bringing it up to inspection for the surveyor to clear it.  After that, the list was long and distinguished year after year.  But as noted above, the first real upgrade right after was replacing the forward tramp and how it was mounted to the hull(s).

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/2/2020 at 6:07 PM, B.J. Porter said:

What's your window for "Just after?"

When I wrote that I was thinking, "I've just plunked down $$$$$ and now I'm spending even more to fix it up."  So I guess the answer to your question is something like a continuous outflow of cash immediately after the purchase.  (I know, it's a boat, what did you expect?)

The boat we bought was so loaded with everything a cruiser would want, we gave stuff away while at the boat yard so we'd have room for the stuff we bought.  I'm sure mental health professionals would have fun with that tidbit of information.

Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, Jules said:
On 1/2/2020 at 6:07 PM, B.J. Porter said:

What's your window for "Just after?"

When I wrote that I was thinking, "I've just plunked down $$$$$ and now I'm spending even more to fix it up."  So I guess the answer to your question is something like a continuous outflow of cash immediately after the purchase.  (I know, it's a boat, what did you expect?)

The boat we bought was so loaded with everything a cruiser would want, we gave stuff away while at the boat yard so we'd have room for the stuff we bought.  I'm sure mental health professionals would have fun with that tidbit of information.

It's the whole "buying a sailboat" thing that tips off the mental health pros

FB- Doug

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

3.5 years into my 1984 Capri 25...

Just after purchase:  Rebuilt trailer, removed old bottom paint, removed furler, bought a new main, replaced aft lower shrouds, new carbofoil, new twings, new spinnaker turning blocks.

Year 2: complete deck job, new deck layout, new interior lights and wiring, bulkhead repair, new lifelines, new spreader brackets, new #1, new spinnaker.  https://boatnotes.com/uncategorized/new-life-old-favorite-capri-25-gets-groove.html

Year 3: refined reef system, new halyards, new halyard sheeves, new out haul sheeves.

Currently: fairing the bottom, new #2.

Type of boat, age of boat, goals for the boat all affect what can or should be done.  But a 35 year old boat will need constant attention but that is part of what I love so much about my boat.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am also five years into my Hunter 31. It was a well equipped boat and I think I added, mostly to livability and cruising readiness, less so to racing capability. One note of caution, think twice before making any structural changes that are difficult to reverse (i.e. cutting furniture to install a microwave). Also, think in terms of systems instead of individual projects:

Plumbing

Replaced all head hoses and head... it started stinking again less than a year later. Next, resealed waste tank, replaced hoses with PVC tubing, switched to fresh water flush, switched to gravity drain to eliminate the waste manual discharge pump - eliminated all odors for good. In retrospect, the entire exercise of replacing the hoses was in vain. Hence my suggestion, think in terms of systems.

Replaced bilge pump / switch, etc. this is a safety issue. Also, inspect and replace all thru hulls and valves

Installed an automatic washing machine under the starboard settee, probably the most useful interior addition

Added two water makers, initially as an experiment, later as one of the essential additions for a cruising boat. The second one is for back up.

Electrical

Added battery capacity and relocated the inverter charger, increased the size of the alternator, added solar - again, you need to think of all of this as a system

Added radar, SSB radio, InReach, log, Sirius Weather, replaced some of the instruments. This took multiple iterations to get it right, for example the radar was initially down in the main saloon, then I added a second display in the cockpit, then I went back to a single display under the dodger. You need time and some meaningful sailing experience on the boat to come up with the right instrument layout for you. 

Interior

Some projects such as LED replacements are easy and expected, others such as replacing the cushions can add a lot of cost and expense. Depending on the climate you are in, definitely add a forced air heater (easy and cheap, extends the sailing season significantly) and electric heaters while at the dock. Window replacements also have a big impact on the ambiance.

Deck

I did not change anything on deck as it was nicely done but set aside budget for fixing things that I broke/lost (boom goose neck, whisker pole - 2x, propeller, strut, genoa, halyards, etc.). The most useful things here are good sails and a good bottom job. 

 

SV Pizzazz

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/21/2019 at 8:29 AM, Jules said:

What upgrades and/or improvements did you make right after buying your boat? 

If you were to do it all over again, would you do the same thing?

Old 4ksb: Added a permanent swim ladder as there was only a portable one aboard.  Added a really good anchor bracket to the bow pulpit.

Both very worthwhile and things I would do again.

New 4ksb: Replaced polyester halyards with Dynema core

 

On both of them there was lots of back maintenance too

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...