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The 2020 Motorcycle Thread


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1 hour ago, mikewof said:

A scrambler is the bike version of a hot rod, except built for poor conditions rather than speed. There is no wrong way to do it, as long as you do it cheap and half-in-the-bag.

Some guy near me went the opposite direction on his scrambler, used a TW, but I can only assume replaced the back sprocket with something smaller, because a TW is so good on the trail that it only does roads grudgingly.

01313_8HD009IbGVx_600x450.jpg

I like the idea of WCB's CB650 scrambler. I've had two CBs, they're great bikes.

Sorry - don't agree.  A scrambler is typically built for looks, not performance.  FFS, a high exhaust?  Want performance for poor conditions... lose weight, add suspension travel and set the geometry to suit.

A Triumph Scrambler weighs 230kg.  That's more than twice the weight of the bike that I rode over here... and I was shitting myself because I was twice the weight of what the locals were riding across here

063wartwreyyhu.jpg

Scramblers are nothing but look at me machines.

 

 

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Practicing social distancing today. 75 miles of mostly 2track and never more then 10 miles as the crow flies from the house.

The CB750 was the best all-around bike I've ever had. It didn't do any one thing best-of, but it did everything very well. And I took a little CB450T from SF to NYC. She wasn't happy with all tha

back in their day, buddy had one of those FJs. What a great ride and still had serious speed. Their nick name said it all:  Velvet Sledgehammer..

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2 hours ago, mikewof said:

A scrambler is the bike version of a hot rod,

A chopper is the bike version of a hot rod.

A scrambler is the bike version of a jacked up 4X4 ;)

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31 minutes ago, MikeHunt said:

Sorry - don't agree.  A scrambler is typically built for looks, not performance. 

Scramblers are nothing but look at me machines.

I think you miss the point.

Street scramblers were intended to be dual purpose street/dirt bike, not hard core off road machines. That's why they had universal tires, not knobbies.

Where I lived when I rode they were perfect - street, grassland and dirt/gravel mountain roads.

For my last bike I bought a Yamaha RT1 Enduro and it was great off road but shit on the street - not a real dual purpose bike.

Trying to turn a street bike into a hard core off road machine is, I agree, a look at me situation.

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

A chopper is the bike version of a hot rod.

A scrambler is the bike version of a jacked up 4X4 ;)

Disagree. Scramblers can be dirt cheap, jacked-up 4x4s are rarely cheap.

A chopper is the motorcycle equivalent to which you sink a bunch of money and time.

A scrambler is the motorcycle equivalent of a busted-up shack near the railroad tracks where you fix it up just well enough so that the cute deadhead chick will get high with you and make out.

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2 hours ago, MikeHunt said:

Sorry - don't agree.  A scrambler is typically built for looks, not performance.  FFS, a high exhaust?  Want performance for poor conditions... lose weight, add suspension travel and set the geometry to suit.

A Triumph Scrambler weighs 230kg.  That's more than twice the weight of the bike that I rode over here... and I was shitting myself because I was twice the weight of what the locals were riding across here

063wartwreyyhu.jpg

Scramblers are nothing but look at me machines.

Maybe it's different in Australia.

In the USA, the scrambler is an often ill-suited motorcycle that you've pressed into a position of scrambling up rocks, mud and steep terrain. And most of the time, the deficiencies of that machine are what make it fun. Anyone can ride a lightweight, overpowered KTM to the top of that remote pass in Southwest Wyoming, but doing it on an old Bultaco Matador, now that's fun. That's scrambling.

It seems that you are more of what we call here to be a "credit card rider" where you find the perfect showroom floor model for what you want to do that day. Honestly, if I had the spare cash laying around, I would probably do it that way too. It's a lot of fun. Just yesterday I was running my old utility work sled up and down Jones Pass. It's an old Polaris with the Fuji 488 two-stroke truck engine in it, stock tracks, so not very aggressive. I got stuck more than once, and while digging her out, I probably would have been happy to trade for a lightweight powder sled with really aggressive tracks that never get stuck. But other times, it's just a beautiful feeling hanging on for dear life as that heavy sled blasts from standstill to holyfuckingshit in the blink of an eye. A really good modern dirt bike is a thing of beauty, but an old bike can be a lot of fun too.

And I've learned over and over that a good rider will spank another rider even on deficient equipment.

And that photo up there, other than that washed-out portion, it looks like a lot of fun. A scrambler should be able to handle riding over rocks. Not just scree, not just shale, but break-your-ass boulders. The TW I ride is really good with rocks. But an old ill-suited street bike can be given the job, just weld some steel sheet below the engine and slide on it like a little metal sled when necessary.

This is the automotive equivalent of scrambler ...

 

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

I think you miss the point.

Street scramblers were intended to be dual purpose street/dirt bike, not hard core off road machines. That's why they had universal tires, not knobbies.

Where I lived when I rode they were perfect - street, grassland and dirt/gravel mountain roads.

For my last bike I bought a Yamaha RT1 Enduro and it was great off road but shit on the street - not a real dual purpose bike.

Trying to turn a street bike into a hard core off road machine is, I agree, a look at me situation.

A well-made scrambler should have steet-legal knobbies.

And the RT1, that's a decent street bike! What do you want from it? My current TW will usually only hit 50 mph on the highway with a lot of coaxing. I once had to ride a 200cc dirt chicken fighter from the Birmingham Airport to Tuscaloosa with a broken throttle cable and a back sprocket the size of a frisbee. Now THAT was "shit on the street"! The RT1 is a beautiful bike, and she actually does really well on the street.

A "dual purpose" motorcycle is not a street bike that can go up a fire trail. A good dual purpose bike is 99% dirt/rock/mud, with just enough street legal stuff (like with a Baja kit) to make it legal to ride on the street.

Riding street is dead easy, what's the point? It's flat, there are no rocks, there is no mud, the trail never disappears into a washout, there are no trees in the way, you'll almost never need to wheelie over a downed electric line, you don't have to worry about snapping your leg off as it jams between two boulders, and you rarely have to worry about slipping off the moss on the rocks through a stream which you are trying to ford.

Usually, the sterotypical scrambler build is an otherwise useless street bike, modified cheaply to handle off-road conditions, and then if they really know what they're doing, they'll spank their best buddy who has the $8,000 rock climbing extravaganza. A scrambler is a visual testament to this statement, "A good rider can rape any ape."

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38 minutes ago, mikewof said:

A scrambler is the motorcycle equivalent of a busted-up shack near the railroad tracks where you fix it up just well enough so that the cute deadhead chick will get high with you and make out.

I confess I hadn't considered that point of view. :D

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8 minutes ago, mikewof said:

A well-made scrambler should have steet-legal knobbies.

And the RT1, that's a decent street bike! What do you want from it? My current TW will only hit 50 mph on the highway with a lot of coaxing. I once had to ride a 200cc dirt chicken fighter from the Birmingham Airport to Tuscaloosa with a broken throttle cable and a back sprocket the size of a frisbee. Now THAT was "shit on the street"!

A "dual purpose" motorcycle is not a street bike that can go up a fire trail. A good dual purpose bike is 99% dirt/rock/mud, with just enough street legal stuff (like with a Baja kit) to make it legal to ride on the street.

Knobbies are knobbies - 5 drops of rain on pavement and your sliding around - it's wet here.

The RT1 was a shit bike on the street - it had no "cruise" - you were either on it or off it. Any attempt at steady state running and it would fart and pop and surge and buck. Just riding it in town was tiring.

Best bike I ever rode in the dirt though (also the last bike I rode).

A dual purpose bike is just that - 1/2 road, 1/2 dirt. What you describe is a slightly tamed purpose built dirt bike.

It takes more than lights and a license plate to make a reasonable street bike.

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Just now, SloopJonB said:

Knobbies are knobbies - 5 drops of rain on pavement and your sliding around - it's wet here.

The RT1 was a shit bike on the street - it had no "cruise" - you were either on it or off it. Any attempt at steady state running and it would fart and pop and surge and buck. Just riding it in town was tiring.

Best bike I ever rode in the dirt though (also the last bike I rode).

A dual purpose bike is just that - 1/2 road, 1/2 dirt. What you describe is a slightly tamed purpose built dirt bike.

It takes more than lights and a license plate to make a reasonable street bike.

You have a point about street riding, sometimes it's too slick. I take the TW out in the snow sometimes, and I'm actually really relieved to get off the street where there is a bit of rock and frozen mud below the snow.

Colorado and Utah are (at least the last time I checked) the only two states that allow a 100% straight-up dirt bike to be converted to street legal with a Baja kit. Most other states need a DOT designation as a street bike. What are the rules about that in Canada? Can you street legal a dirt bike with a Baja kit?

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I have a son.  I put him on a bike at 10 years old.

Now, he is a smart ass.  Damn, my mother told me it was coming.

We did a little ride together not too long ago.

He had his bike made for the trails but legal for streets.  I had my old school Harley.

He shook himself to death and I cruised.

Now his bike is sold, like me, he realized being an organ donor is second place to raising children.

I still have the bike, if someone can use my organs better than me, go for it.  And I like the bike and the freedom it portends. 

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4 hours ago, sshow bob said:

Miss my 1100 sport.  (photo is representative; read the prospectus before investing.)

1996-Moto-Guzzi-Sport-1100-R-Side.jpg

many decades ago, - when I first saw those engine cases with the external webbing, I was instantly smitten.  Then I heard one coming down one of the passes in the Dolomites,  and I knew I'd had to have at least one of them at some stage.

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I was limited to New England, but I found the occasional stone cut pass to rip through. I had a sweet deal with that bike. It was owned by someone trying unsuccessfully to sell it. It was mine to ride until it sold, ideally to places motorcyclists congregated.  I got a whole summer and most of the next one with it. Then it sold to someone who saw it outside a coffee place. Cost me consumables to play with it.   

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All I will contribute to the whole Scrambler/poser debate is you really owe it to yourself to ride different kinds of bikes and find the one that works for you.  If it's not fun,  you're doing it wrong.

Folks love to hate on the ADV mounts,  but I have to say they're perfect for me - best at shitty roads:  it's like they were made for this town.

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6 minutes ago, Great Red Shark said:

All I will contribute to the whole Scrambler/poser debate is you really owe it to yourself to ride different kinds of bikes and find the one that works for you.  If it's not fun,  you're doing it wrong.

Folks love to hate on the ADV mounts,  but I have to say they're perfect for me - best at shitty roads:  it's like they were made for this town.

Most intelligent post made in this thread.

 

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51 minutes ago, Great Red Shark said:

many decades ago, - when I first saw those engine cases with the external webbing, I was instantly smitten.  Then I heard one coming down one of the passes in the Dolomites,  and I knew I'd had to have at least one of them at some stage.

When I was in Aviano - a friend loaned me his M900 Monster for the weekend.  That bike BEGGED to be beaten - and a sneaky witch she was too, it was TOO easy to over-ride your abilities because the bike was so perfectly balanced.  

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2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Knobbies are knobbies - 5 drops of rain on pavement and your sliding around - it's wet here.

The RT1 was a shit bike on the street - it had no "cruise" - you were either on it or off it. Any attempt at steady state running and 

It takes more than lights and a license plate to make a reasonable street bike.

On Mulholland highway at "The Rock Store" was a YZ400, rearsets, dragbar handlebars and 18 inch track slicks front and rear. And a brakelight. Perfect for that setting, carving tight paved corners up the hill but not ideal for the ride to get there.

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1 hour ago, Great Red Shark said:

All I will contribute to the whole Scrambler/poser debate is you really owe it to yourself to ride different kinds of bikes and find the one that works for you.  If it's not fun,  you're doing it wrong.

Folks love to hate on the ADV mounts,  but I have to say they're perfect for me - best at shitty roads:  it's like they were made for this town.

I think, also, there is a disconnect on terminology here and it may be age related.  Scrambler was a class of motorcycle  for manufactures in the 60s.s-l400.jpg.535a7f9372e044b16d559a879e75e1f8.jpgA boom in sales late 60s brought on perhaps by Japanese reliability allowed manufactures to actually make money selling enduros like Yamaha DT 125, 175, 250, 360 and later 400.687709573_Honda-1Mainjpg.jpg.40c1b451ae8d7fbdf8d927fe7e6d039d.jpgThis, a Honda MT250.

The scrambler had some features to make it useful off the road, the enduro approached from the other end and had some features to make it useful on the road.

About 1977 I spent a fair amount of time at Fort Bliss and there was a lovely armor rough terrain area uswd by tanks and other tracked vehicles.  Evenings and weekends the area was great for dirt riding. I had a CanAm 175. An older rider occasionally showed up on a mid 60s BSA twin with knobs. He was a great feet up powerslider in the fast stuff.

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4 hours ago, mikewof said:

 What are the rules about that in Canada? Can you street legal a dirt bike with a Baja kit?

No idea - the last bike I registered was the RT1 in 1974.

Wardodo covered it quite well I think. :blink:

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7 hours ago, Great Red Shark said:

many decades ago, - when I first saw those engine cases with the external webbing, I was instantly smitten.  Then I heard one coming down one of the passes in the Dolomites,  and I knew I'd had to have at least one of them at some stage.

Is it possible to have one Guzzi? Everyone I know who gets one finds that their garage is filled with them in a few years. They apparently multiply on their own.

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7 hours ago, Great Red Shark said:

All I will contribute to the whole Scrambler/poser debate is you really owe it to yourself to ride different kinds of bikes and find the one that works for you.  If it's not fun,  you're doing it wrong.

Folks love to hate on the ADV mounts,  but I have to say they're perfect for me - best at shitty roads:  it's like they were made for this town.

They're great bikes, nobody is hating on them. I want to get an old Transalp someday, in the years before they weighed it down with the Africa Twin hardware.

But they're scary bikes in the rocks because if you plant your foot in the wrong place, the sheer weight of that bike is going to break a leg. If you stay out of the rocks of unstable ground they seem incredible. You have all that weight up high, nice to throw around, and all that power.

It's also kind of a safety thing ... dual sports encourage you to ride them like a blood maniac, because they have all that low-end torque, high-up weight, and they're a blast to throw around. But on the street, sometimes shit goes sideways, and 650-some ccs will put you in a situation that isn't so easy to escape as 250-some ccs.

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3 hours ago, Great Red Shark said:

It appears,  to my untrained eye,  to be fucked.  Thuoroughly.

That's the way it is with planes, right?

Any old car or bike can be made to run, but when a plane gets overly neglected, is it essentially impossible to get it certified for flight again at less than the cost of a replacement plane?

What a great looking piece of yard candy though huh? I would love to have a derelict plane in my yard. It's even more rockstar than having a derelict streamroller or bucket truck.

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9 hours ago, mikewof said:

 What are the rules about that in Canada? Can you street legal a dirt bike with a Baja kit?

The rules changed over the years. NHTSA  probably had something to do with it in the US.  Canada has at least 4 provinces, British Colombia, Alberta, Saskatchewan and the area near French Quebec. BC you can probably ride an all electric anything on public highways if you paid tje emmissions surcharge. Alberta lets you ride 2 strokes everywhere of you use orgamic two atroke oil. Saskatchewan  requires a. "Agricultural Plate" on your ringding dirt bike and your Massey Ferguson tractor and every where else you need to respond to an inquiry of "parley vou francios?"

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5 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

No idea - the last bike I registered was the RT1 in 1974.

Wardodo covered it quite well I think. :blink:

My uncle had great "Detective" magazines and every cycle world, cycle guide, motorcyclist, cycleyear, cycledecade and cycle century. From the 50s to the 70s. I visited him often.  I imagined the ferocious speed I could attain on the the scramblers of the 60s, 3 to 13 pounds lighter than the street models:lol:

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8 hours ago, warbird said:

I think, also, there is a disconnect on terminology here and it may be age related.  Scrambler was a class of motorcycle  for manufactures in the 60s.

The manufacturers use and discard these things as necessary.

A while back, a "desert sled" was a snowmobile that someone replaced the front skis with wheels, run them to Little Sahara or BLM land. But then Ducati got the idea to call their baja-style scrambler bike the "Desert Sled" and now actual desert sleds need to be called "sandmobiles" which sucks as a name. But the bike is kind of nice, kind of heavy, but nice.

2019%20Ducati%20Scrambler%20Desert%20Sle

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My first bike was a Yamaha 250 Catalina like this;

image.png.84bc9e8185f9a46edb88b4be3830d726.png

The street scrambler version was called the Big Bear. Same bike but with high pipes, braced bars, chopped fender, "knobbier" tires (universals) and IIRC a skid plate under the engine.

image.png.7e3b48daf96044f81b5c42707e82af0e.png

The RT1 Enduro was a lot more serious off road.

image.png.2d46d4193708acb0adcfe4f74e882e5b.png

I think these show the differences I was referring to up thread.

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On 2/3/2020 at 5:47 PM, mikewof said:

They use straight pipes because they're loud. A lot of them are concerned about getting hit, so they ride in groups and they ride loud. And then they put the bumper stickers on their trucks ...

rBVaVVy51-eAWmwNAAElRkmnvkw953.jpg

They probably do save lives, at the cost of making the rest of us feel like we're about to die.

 

I lived for 20 years in a state where one did not have to wear a helmet.

funny thing is the same rubes who run straight pipes and have these bs stickers are the same clowns who do not wear a helmet.

Safety huh???

Just pissing off drivers and home owners trying act like they have a big penis...

 

when I was in the service we had an old NCO Johnny Johnson who told the story of being stationed in England in the 60s.

One of his buddies had a hopped up American pony car with straight exhaust.  Going down the road one summer day a local in a  MG pulls aside of them and says

"I say that is an awful lot of noise for a just little bit of motoring.."

 

My hearing was shot at age 50 from the wind buffeting noise of a 3/4 helmet and always having mufflers.

No sure how some of these riders hear a conversation at 60+ years old after 40 years of shortie/no helmet and straight pipes.

 

Only cut off seriously twice in my life as I am watching the cagers and not getting into  situations where they can get me (pass them quick and move on..).

Installing an air horn helps too.   If they miss your scoot and drift their lane, all they hear is a semi tractor trailer in their ear. THey always yank it the opposite direction stat...

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16 hours ago, warbird said:

I think, also, there is a disconnect on terminology here and it may be age related.  Scrambler was a class of motorcycle  for manufactures in the 60s.s-l400.jpg.535a7f9372e044b16d559a879e75e1f8.jpgA boom in sales late 60s brought on perhaps by Japanese reliability allowed manufactures to actually make money selling enduros like Yamaha DT 125, 175, 250, 360 and later 400.687709573_Honda-1Mainjpg.jpg.40c1b451ae8d7fbdf8d927fe7e6d039d.jpgThis, a Honda MT250.

The scrambler had some features to make it useful off the road, the enduro approached from the other end and had some features to make it useful on the road.

About 1977 I spent a fair amount of time at Fort Bliss and there was a lovely armor rough terrain area uswd by tanks and other tracked vehicles.  Evenings and weekends the area was great for dirt riding. I had a CanAm 175. An older rider occasionally showed up on a mid 60s BSA twin with knobs. He was a great feet up powerslider in the fast stuff.

This is my garage just after college, except the Norton was a Commando and the Honda was an XL250 , but basically identical. 

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16 hours ago, warbird said:

I think, also, there is a disconnect on terminology here and it may be age related.  Scrambler was a class of motorcycle  for manufactures in the 60s.s-l400.jpg.535a7f9372e044b16d559a879e75e1f8.jpgA boom in sales late 60s brought on perhaps by Japanese reliability allowed manufactures to actually make money selling enduros like Yamaha DT 125, 175, 250, 360 and later 400.687709573_Honda-1Mainjpg.jpg.40c1b451ae8d7fbdf8d927fe7e6d039d.jpgThis, a Honda MT250.

The scrambler had some features to make it useful off the road, the enduro approached from the other end and had some features to make it useful on the road.

About 1977 I spent a fair amount of time at Fort Bliss and there was a lovely armor rough terrain area uswd by tanks and other tracked vehicles.  Evenings and weekends the area was great for dirt riding. I had a CanAm 175. An older rider occasionally showed up on a mid 60s BSA twin with knobs. He was a great feet up powerslider in the fast stuff.

 

8 hours ago, mikewof said:

The manufacturers use and discard these things as necessary.

A while back, a "desert sled" was a snowmobile that someone replaced the front skis with wheels, run them to Little Sahara or BLM land. But then Ducati got the idea to call their baja-style scrambler bike the "Desert Sled" and now actual desert sleds need to be called "sandmobiles" which sucks as a name. But the bike is kind of nice, kind of heavy, but nice.

2019%20Ducati%20Scrambler%20Desert%20Sle

From wiki 

 

"Origins. The genesis of motocross came in the UK in the early 1900s where Auto-Cycle Clubs would host time trials. These trials evolved into regular off-road events called 'scrambles'. The first ever official scramble was held in Camberley, Surrey in 1924"

hence the scrambler was born.

Scrambles became motocross when someone figured out that they could sell tickets to spectators and started making tracks rather than a long rambling route. With spectators came advertising and sponsorship.

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53 minutes ago, sshow bob said:

This is my garage just after college, except the Norton was a Commando and the Honda was an XL250 , but basically identical. 

Commando,  lovely bike.  I rode a friend's 850 . It was dusk,  43 years ago and we were a couple beers into a party so I did not push it by any means but remember the Isolastic engine mounts did a nice job of smoothing out those 2  big pistons.

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That was a really great bike.  I bought it in boxes and worked with a vintage bike mech over the winter to restore and assemble it.  I was too light at the time to kick it effectively without jumping on the lever. I got launched a couple of times while I was learning.  So much torque.

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My new NC 750x Daily commuter, tourer...

Automatic with DCT Double Clutch  works fantastic. Drive and Sport mode. Pushbutton manual option.
Shifts better than I ever could.
Nothing fancy but dependable, get's fantastic milage 60-70  mpg riding 150-160kmh on the Autobahn. 
Not fast but enough for what I want. Lot's of torque...
No long trips this year, Italy for sure, Switzerland and France  too.
Next year Norway is my plan.

NC.jpg

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21 minutes ago, GER308 said:

My new NC 750x Daily commuter, tourer...

Automatic with DCT Double Clutch  works fantastic. Drive and Sport mode. Pushbutton manual option.
Shifts better than I ever could.
Nothing fancy but dependable, get's fantastic milage 60-70  mpg riding 150-160kmh on the Autobahn. 
Not fast but enough for what I want. Lot's of torque...

NC.jpg

How does an automatic work on a bike?

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3 minutes ago, warbird said:

How does an automatic work on a bike?

You ever drive an electric shift Honda 4 wheeler, or a Honda 50/70/90?    They have a centrifugal clutch on the end of the gearbox, but, ya still shift gears. 

The dual-clutch transmissions take that a bit further: 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dual-clutch_transmission

 

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10 minutes ago, warbird said:

How does an automatic work on a bike?

It's a double clutch so it's more of a computer controlled manual.
Split second shifts, so hardly notice it.
2 modes, Drive which shifts really early early but is super economical. I use it if I am just putting around through traffic.

Mine is a 2015 model, new in 2016. 2016 model came out with 3 sport modes.
Sport which shifts more like I would normally ride. Thumb and forefinger for the + / - buttons to adjust.
You can select manual mode and just shift with the buttons, no letting off the throttle just hit the button.Smoother and faster than you could manage manually.

Most, me included, are skeptical at first, try it and don't want anything else

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22 hours ago, mikewof said:

Maybe it's different in Australia.

In the USA, the scrambler is an often ill-suited motorcycle that you've pressed into a position of scrambling up rocks, mud and steep terrain. And most of the time, the deficiencies of that machine are what make it fun. Anyone can ride a lightweight, overpowered KTM to the top of that remote pass in Southwest Wyoming, but doing it on an old Bultaco Matador, now that's fun. That's scrambling.

It seems that you are more of what we call here to be a "credit card rider" where you find the perfect showroom floor model for what you want to do that day. Honestly, if I had the spare cash laying around, I would probably do it that way too. It's a lot of fun. Just yesterday I was running my old utility work sled up and down Jones Pass. It's an old Polaris with the Fuji 488 two-stroke truck engine in it, stock tracks, so not very aggressive. I got stuck more than once, and while digging her out, I probably would have been happy to trade for a lightweight powder sled with really aggressive tracks that never get stuck. But other times, it's just a beautiful feeling hanging on for dear life as that heavy sled blasts from standstill to holyfuckingshit in the blink of an eye. A really good modern dirt bike is a thing of beauty, but an old bike can be a lot of fun too.

And I've learned over and over that a good rider will spank another rider even on deficient equipment.

And that photo up there, other than that washed-out portion, it looks like a lot of fun. A scrambler should be able to handle riding over rocks. Not just scree, not just shale, but break-your-ass boulders. The TW I ride is really good with rocks. But an old ill-suited street bike can be given the job, just weld some steel sheet below the engine and slide on it like a little metal sled when necessary.

This is the automotive equivalent of scrambler ...

 

Well, you got one thing right, but that's about all.  Yes, a "scrambler" is ill-suited for what it's supposedly marketed to do.

As for being a "credit card rider" - you can stick that where it fits... sorta like my thumb up this brake piston's arse

00as1e.jpg

I ride every day. 

Every single day. 

Today, I rode a scooter numerous times - as I do in preference to driving my truck on 99% of transport trips.  I also rode a CRF250M with 39,000km on it - and I might even ride it on a ride I'm leading tomorrow... depending on whether my wife rides another bike or not.  Both my KTMs are highly modified - to suit where I ride - and cheque book riding (oh sorry, I forgot, you appear asset-poor - credit card riding) doesn't come into it.  Not in the slightest.

One thing we appear to agree on is that an old dirt bike can be a lot of fun.  I run a mixed fleet - some 25 year old dirt bikes to cater for the dreadlock crowd that is always chasing something cheap.  I, of course, check ride these bikes... and some of them are gems, albeit apparently too complex for the millenials - you know, they have a fuel on-off-reserve switch, a choke and most confusing of all, a kill switch that allows the engine to crank when off.

Had a huge millennials laugh a couple of months back.  My mechanic had signed up a couple of American lads, who'd professed experience.  "Boss - have problem".  I went out and these two clowns were sitting on the dirt bikes... "But they aren't automatic".

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3 hours ago, MikeHunt said:

Well, you got one thing right, but that's about all.  Yes, a "scrambler" is ill-suited for what it's supposedly marketed to do.

As for being a "credit card rider" - you can stick that where it fits... sorta like my thumb up this brake piston's arse

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I ride every day. 

Every single day. 

Today, I rode a scooter numerous times - as I do in preference to driving my truck on 99% of transport trips.  I also rode a CRF250M with 39,000km on it - and I might even ride it on a ride I'm leading tomorrow... depending on whether my wife rides another bike or not.  Both my KTMs are highly modified - to suit where I ride - and cheque book riding (oh sorry, I forgot, you appear asset-poor - credit card riding) doesn't come into it.  Not in the slightest.

One thing we appear to agree on is that an old dirt bike can be a lot of fun.  I run a mixed fleet - some 25 year old dirt bikes to cater for the dreadlock crowd that is always chasing something cheap.  I, of course, check ride these bikes... and some of them are gems, albeit apparently too complex for the millenials - you know, they have a fuel on-off-reserve switch, a choke and most confusing of all, a kill switch that allows the engine to crank when off.

Had a huge millennials laugh a couple of months back.  My mechanic had signed up a couple of American lads, who'd professed experience.  "Boss - have problem".  I went out and these two clowns were sitting on the dirt bikes... "But they aren't automatic".

No insult intended, you have a KLX, you know who butters the muffins.

If I had the garage space and a lack of dependents to allow me to purchase a purpose-designed bike for each of my purposes, then I would keep a full stable.

But I don't. So it's the TW for my dual-sport use, the Polaris with the polite track and the truck engine for my snow use, and usually just a chicken fighter for commuting or errands.

You're peddling to the vendor on the desires of the "dreadlock crowd." I grew up at a time when the baddest bike in the boneyard was anything by Bultaco. Get back to me when you've experienced a cyclical gear box and a reversed brake-shift. You young'ns have no idea how difficult it used to be to jump from one bike to the next ... like learning to play the guitar and then you have a bassoon in your hands in front of a live, studio audience.

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4 hours ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

You ever drive an electric shift Honda 4 wheeler, or a Honda 50/70/90?    They have a centrifugal clutch on the end of the gearbox, but, ya still shift gears. 

The dual-clutch transmissions take that a bit further: 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dual-clutch_transmission

 

I know the DCT, clever piece.  The Homda 50/70/90 are also dual clutch.  The shift lever activates a clutch that disengages the engine  from the transmission. Great fun pm small atvs when you want a holeshot.

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On 3/6/2020 at 3:23 AM, mikewof said:

No insult intended, you have a KLX, you know who butters the muffins.

If I had the garage space and a lack of dependents to allow me to purchase a purpose-designed bike for each of my purposes, then I would keep a full stable.

But I don't. So it's the TW for my dual-sport use, the Polaris with the polite track and the truck engine for my snow use, and usually just a chicken fighter for commuting or errands.

You're peddling to the vendor on the desires of the "dreadlock crowd." I grew up at a time when the baddest bike in the boneyard was anything by Bultaco. Get back to me when you've experienced a cyclical gear box and a reversed brake-shift. You young'ns have no idea how difficult it used to be to jump from one bike to the next ... like learning to play the guitar and then you have a bassoon in your hands in front of a live, studio audience.

Ha ha - that just brought back a memory.  For my sins, I have a Lifan 200 Cross.  Without going into all the specifics of why I have it.... let's just say it looks superficially like another bike.  Anyhow, that cheap and nasty piece of work has the same gearshift pattern as the shop hack - a Honda Wave.  Neutral at the top and five down (four for the Wave). 

Some nong hired it about a year back - it being the cheapest thing I hire (I don't hire scooters)... at US$15 a day.  I don't record mileages, but for some reason I'd looked at the odo before said Nong set off.  He came back a couple of hours later and said "the gearbox is broken".  I jumped on and rode it around the block, going through all the gears three times... and noticing that he'd done 31 km on the bike.... which was, shall we say, rather warm.  

"Nothing wrong with it..." says I.  "Yes there is, when you go first to second (he makes an upward motion with his hand), there's nothing there".  So I play along, using downward gestures  "First... second... third.... fourth.... fifth, all fine".  He repeated it... upward gesture and all.  Anyhow, to cut a long story short... I finally packed him off with his new-found knowledge that not all gearboxes have the same shift pattern.  That poor bloody bike had done 31 kilometres in first gear.  Yeah, my fault for not telling him... but what a nong.  31 km.

One more  - two young American lads came in, bullshitted about their experience (I don't rent to learners - Thailand is not the place to learn to ride, but it's brilliant for those with experience - riding Nirvana).  Anyhow - the young chaps do the paperwork and my mechanic is doing final checks and packing them off on a pair of Honda CRF dualsport 250s.  He comes in to where I was "Boss - have problem".  I go out and these two lads are sitting on the bikes, all kitted up.... and one of them says "But they're not automatic".  

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Speaking of motorcycling Nirvana - here's a road that I promote strongly... the back road to Pai.  

0md1j.jpg

People who ride like that on the front road, which is far more heavily trafficked end up as bus mascots on a regular basis. 

I took a group up this road last week - we went up the back road, down the front - with a stop near the Witch's Tits to fly the drone.  We passed a young Indian couple being treated by an ambulance on our way back.  Yet another inexperienced rider who'd scarred up his girlfriends arms and legs for life.  Anyhow... the fastest bike on the ride up was the smallest bike of the nine.  A Ninja 400.  That's often the case up here... the smaller bikes are far better suited to a road that's got 1,000 or so corners in 200 km.

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1 hour ago, MikeHunt said:

Ha ha - that just brought back a memory.  For my sins, I have a Lifan 200 Cross.  Without going into all the specifics of why I have it.... let's just say it looks superficially like another bike.  Anyhow, that cheap and nasty piece of work has the same gearshift pattern as the shop hack - a Honda Wave.  Neutral at the top and five down (four for the Wave). 

Some nong hired it about a year back - it being the cheapest thing I hire (I don't hire scooters)... at US$15 a day.  I don't record mileages, but for some reason I'd looked at the odo before said Nong set off.  He came back a couple of hours later and said "the gearbox is broken".  I jumped on and rode it around the block, going through all the gears three times... and noticing that he'd done 31 km on the bike.... which was, shall we say, rather warm.  

"Nothing wrong with it..." says I.  "Yes there is, when you go first to second (he makes an upward motion with his hand), there's nothing there".  So I play along, using downward gestures  "First... second... third.... fourth.... fifth, all fine".  He repeated it... upward gesture and all.  Anyhow, to cut a long story short... I finally packed him off with his new-found knowledge that not all gearboxes have the same shift pattern.  That poor bloody bike had done 31 kilometres in first gear.  Yeah, my fault for not telling him... but what a nong.  31 km.

One more  - two young American lads came in, bullshitted about their experience (I don't rent to learners - Thailand is not the place to learn to ride, but it's brilliant for those with experience - riding Nirvana).  Anyhow - the young chaps do the paperwork and my mechanic is doing final checks and packing them off on a pair of Honda CRF dualsport 250s.  He comes in to where I was "Boss - have problem".  I go out and these two lads are sitting on the bikes, all kitted up.... and one of them says "But they're not automatic".  

Neutral up and 4 down, how old in that Lifan!?!?

Lifan is a very strange brand. We've only had it here in the USA for about ten years, and it's rarely available at the dealerships, it's more of an "internet" bike, buy it for a song on Amazon. They started to import them into the USA when Lifan started doing contract work with Polaris, Yamaha, etc.. I guess the old-timers figured the quality had finally caught up. And yes, they are really strange bikes, they seem to have really weak counterbalance, and half the nuts vibrate off of them. I had one for about a year, (the Chinese dual-sports are dubbed "Chicken Fighters" in the USA) and it wasn't a high performance bike in any way, but it really had its charms. It had great low-end, it was dead easy to fix.

The Bultacos and their weird shift pattern, it was -- if memory serves, 1-down, and then 2-up, 3-up, 4-up ... but heaven forbid if you went looking for that fifth gear (or if you had the fifth gear cyclic) because the whole shift pattern would START FUCKING OVER!!!!

So you might be pulling a happy double-nickle on a county road, feel like you want to save a little fuel, shift up into fifth (or into sixth because we are human and err) release the clutch, and yeah ... YOU WERE IN FUCKING FIRST GEAR AT 50-SOME MPFUCKINGH!!!!!

The joke with the Bultacos was that they came with a six-pack of pistons, presumably because they ran so fucking hot and the pistons were so well balanced, that they tended to burn through in that bike. But DULCHE MADRE, the way that bike sang, it didn't purr like the Italian bikes, or humm like the Japanese bikes, or belch like the American and German bikes. The Spanish bikes shouted "fuck me!" in their tone, the sound of those bikes grabbed your fucking nutsack. There was nothing like a Bultaco back then, and there really isn't anything like it today. The Bultacos were kind of like a Honda Trail 90 and an Africa Twin got together and hired a Spanish hooker.

The only human comparison to the Bultaco was that Romanian girl in the Fiat Abarth ads ...

 

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Ah - we digress... the Abarth.  Marcus Ambrose's step-father has (or had a few years back, in the days when Marcus was racing in the US) an old Abarth.  Got a photo somewhere.

On the Lifan - I had it in Laos a few years back and it was woeful.  I bottomed the front forks multiple times... and the rear end continuously on a ride out to Lima Site 36

Here it is just south of the old strip.  That Russian chopper had just landed (it flew in as I had the drone up... which caused a bit of excitement).  It was carrying US Army bods - an MIA team recovering some guys killed in a chopper crash when the base was overrun by the Pathet Lao in '68.  All the kids were provided by the village elders - to guide us through the minefield.

0g13.jpg

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First SXSW, now this:

 

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MotoGP Red Bull Grand Prix of the Americas Postponed until November 13-15, 2020

With the disruption in international flights serving areas that are home to many teams, fans, freight and competitors, the MotoGP Red Bull Grand Prix of the Americas has been postponed until November 15, 2020.

 

We are glad that there are no cases of the virus in Austin and recognize that the risks of getting sick are very low, however, an international event of this sort presents logistics concerns, travel commitments, and significant advance planning.

 

All tickets purchased will be valid for the November event. While we greatly appreciate the ongoing support and patronage of the fans, we recognize that some ticket holders may need a refund. COTA will honor any such request if received by July 1, 2020.

 

Already got my tickets and had rooms reserved. Oh, well, just gives me more time to try and talk the SO into a new (to me,anyway) Concourse...

 

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On 1/11/2020 at 10:05 PM, mikewof said:

That's the worst. You're having a good day, all is well, and then you see your old love, with a few small changes from the new owner. The rest of the day is spent in regret at having sold her.

and looking for a replacement...

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work in progress.  1982 Yamaha XJ1100 Maxim. after my father's passing, one of his lifelong friends gave it to me as a project. Needs some re-engineering as certain parts are made out of unobtainium.

previous , 1984 Honda 700cc Saber, 1978 Suzuki GS750.

20200307_143735.jpg

20200307_143752.jpg

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55 minutes ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

If ya don't already have one, you might want to look for one of the 4-port vacuum gauges - it comes in handy when it's time to synch the carbs. 

 

yep, it's on the list.  The PITA on this is that this has the Yamaha YICS system (  http://xjbikes.wikidot.com/yics   ) that apparently makes this even more a challenge then normal.

 

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8 minutes ago, linaszuk said:

yep, it's on the list.  The PITA on this is that this has the Yamaha YICS system (  http://xjbikes.wikidot.com/yics   ) that apparently makes this even more a challenge then normal.

 

Hmm - seems that that might hide un-equal vacuum between carbs - I've never dealt with that.  

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On 3/13/2020 at 9:29 AM, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

Hmm - seems that that might hide un-equal vacuum between carbs - I've never dealt with that.  

yeah.  there's an official block-off tool to allow the carbs to sync properly.  or you can make one. 10mm bolt or dowel I've seen.  it'll be interesting.

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6 minutes ago, warbird said:

Do they make them with 6 speeds

yes, they have a 6-speed dual-clutch "automatic" transmission.

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5 hours ago, Trovão said:

yes, they have a 6-speed dual-clutch "automatic" transmission.

I had an old Lambretta 175 way back. Had a clutch-less, or centrifugal maybe, 4 speed that you shifted by twisting the left grip. very Italian. not big, lots of revs and enthusiasm. whole lot of fun while I had it. 

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I put in over 1,600km / 1,000 miles last week - and most of it in the twisties - we focus on back roads here - little traffic, no cops (although we did blow by a couple of their trucks at 30+ over.  No reaction from them, of course.

Short clip

 

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On 3/15/2020 at 1:25 AM, warbird said:

You shift it?

there are shift pads if you want to use them (on "manual" mode) but, otherwise, you don't need to - it's automatic.

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3 minutes ago, warbird said:

What motor is in it? Something interesting?

i think so.

engine is a 2-cylinder 4 stroke 750cc with max power of 54,8 cv at 6.250 rpm and max torque 6,93 kgf.m at 4.750 rpm

 

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1 minute ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

For us trgolodytes who are used to measuring the output of internal combustion engines in HP, 1 cv = 1.0142777265087 HP 

which translates to ~55.6 hp. not really much difference...;)

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35 minutes ago, Trovão said:

which translates to ~55.6 hp. not really much difference...;)

I need my fix of early morning pedantry here - 54 HP - the metric unit is bigger so you divide to get HP, not multiply.

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35 minutes ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

55HP in a <400lb chassis is plenty for fun. 

Are we discussing the NC750X?  It's a 480lb bike.  Heavy and under-powered, but good for what it was designed to be.  I'd rather ride one of my 500X Hondas.

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5 hours ago, Trovão said:

i think so.

engine is a 2-cylinder 4 stroke 750cc with max power of 54,8 cv at 6.250 rpm and max torque 6,93 kgf.m at 4.750 rpm

 

Looks interesting, an updated Burgman,  Yamaha or Honda 650cc scooter of the 90s?

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3 hours ago, warbird said:

Looks interesting, an updated Burgman,  Yamaha or Honda 650cc scooter of the 90s?

it's the honda x-adv 750 scooter.

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8 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

I need my fix of early morning pedantry here - 54 HP - the metric unit is bigger so you divide to get HP, not multiply.

whatever. still makes very little to practically no difference.

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8 hours ago, Great Red Shark said:

There's always that one guy that would tell you a 40 year old bike is somehow better than the new design.

The CX,  while admirable for its service record for when built,  is slow. heavy and, heavy-handling 

Apparently you weren't around in The Good Old Days. ;)

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5 hours ago, chester said:

the venerable honda 150 Cargo.  Drive a new one away from a Mexican dealer for $1,330 USD

 

Image result for honda cargo 150

How is that even possible?

There has to be most of that just in raw materials.

a 150 Honda cost almost that much when I was in high school 50 years ago.

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10 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

How is that even possible?

There has to be most of that just in raw materials.

a 150 Honda cost almost that much when I was in high school 50 years ago.

I don't know but if you go to honda.mx, all the Mexican dealerships say 30,500 pesos. 

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16 hours ago, chester said:

the venerable honda 150 Cargo.  Drive a new one away from a Mexican dealer for $1,330 USD

 

Image result for honda cargo 150

That would be great for grocery/liquor store runs. And especially as a shuttle on raft trips.

Who'd have thought any thing is still made with drum brakes?

I did a little reading and it's very popular with delivery drivers down there.

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25 minutes ago, bmiller said:

That would be great for grocery/liquor store runs. And especially as a shuttle on raft trips.

Who'd have thought any thing is still made with drum brakes?

I did a little reading and it's very popular with delivery drivers down there.

I bought a Honda Wave a year or so back with drum brakes.  It was about $45 more to get a disk brake and electric starter.  I bought it second hand, a week old, with less than 6 miles on it... I'd have stumped the extra if I'd bought it new.  Someone I knew bought it as an incentive to get a relative off drugs.  He didn't even go clean for a day, so she took it back and sold it to me at 75% of new cost.  New cost was about $1,200.

 

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1 hour ago, bmiller said:

That would be great for grocery/liquor store runs. And especially as a shuttle on raft trips.

Who'd have thought any thing is still made with drum brakes?

I did a little reading and it's very popular with delivery drivers down there.

They are fucking everywhere! I want one for getting around Bahia Banderos. I spent the last two weeks scheming on a rack that would hold beach chairs, umbrella, beach bag and a cooler!  Then I started wondering about performance upgrades, front disc and cool tires! :-):-)

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