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Matagi

Class 40 Carac / Pinocchio capsized / presumed sunk off Azores

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Happened shortly before Christmas, apparently. Skippers Louis Duc and Thomas Servignat survived in the survival suits, were airlifted by portuguese navy chopper. The boat capsized in bad conditions soutwest of the Azores and remained mainly submerged (which is visible in the video). Boat and crew were found roughly 36 hours later. It is currently unknown if Carac subsequently sunk or remains UFO.

The story only came to my attention through a German article on segelreporter.de, there is also a story on the FB page of Louis Duc.

Anybody with more information?

 

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Is this the first Class 40 lost at sea? The class has been so reliable over the years.

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36 minutes ago, Jono said:

Is this the first Class 40 lost at sea? The class has been so reliable over the years.

No.

First in a while though, and I agree that the class has a good record in this regard.

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On 1/14/2020 at 5:45 AM, 38°59'N said:

Says they got pooped by a big wave out of the blue while a drop in wind speed and shift in wind direction had them sailing low and slow (the autopilot's wind mode being out of action, they were sailing in compass mode).  Surprised that the boat filled up so quickly unless the cockpit floor or some other structural member failed and a torrent poured in.  There's a lot of volume inside these boats.

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Hi DD,

I saw a report the mast/spreaders punched holes in the boat, but even then I didn’t think it would immerse that much.

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10 hours ago, DFL1010 said:

No.

First in a while though, and I agree that the class has a good record in this regard.

I believe this is the first Class40 to be lost at sea. The boat I think you might be referencing was Claire Pruvot's which was abandoned in the Route du Rhum and recovered some time later. I think it might still be sat in V1D2 in Caen.  

2 hours ago, shaggybaxter said:

Hi DD,

I saw a report the mast/spreaders punched holes in the boat, but even then I didn’t think it would immerse that much.

I think everyone is surprised to be honest. Expect to see rule changes - increase in buoyancy to 105%. If you read Louis's note he talks a lot of sense about grab bags and other things - it's worth a read. Lots of lessons learnt in this one. 

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I'm sure Marc Lombard & others are looking at the after action report - but changing the class rules because of one event may be jumping the gun. Yes the boat had to be abandoned but they remained with it until rescue - that's good IMO. 

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5 hours ago, Bentley the Badger said:

The boat I think you might be referencing was Claire Pruvot's

Yup, which we fished up 250 odd miles SW of Ireland and towed to Falmouth.

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18 hours ago, Jono said:

Is this the first Class 40 lost at sea? The class has been so reliable over the years.

No. There were at least other three (all of them while making the way back to Europe after a transatlantic race):

https://www.yachtingmonthly.com/news/yacht-lost-in-north-atlantic-after-collision-5099

http://www.seasailsurf.com/5633-Un-Class40-en-perdition-au-large-des-Bermudes?lang=fr

https://www.seasailsurf.com/5652-Un-2e-Class40-abandonne-lors-du-convoyage-retour?lang=fr

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1 hour ago, fdcampello said:

Fair play! I had no recollection of any of those - very interesting to read, thank you. That edition of the Solitaire du Chocolat was an expensive one - two Class40s broke anchor in Mexico too? 

 

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Maybe the rest of the yachting world could learn a thing or two from the Class. 
They do seem remarkably resilient compared to some. 
Doesnt look too shabby for 8 yrs of floating around near the SO.

246440CF-42B3-4207-94D0-8560FF985455.jpeg.7eb49ad83ad12f124e6f4316d1eddc24.jpeg

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5 hours ago, Miffy said:

I'm sure Marc Lombard & others are looking at the after action report - but changing the class rules because of one event may be jumping the gun. Yes the boat had to be abandoned but they remained with it until rescue - that's good IMO. 

Great news story in general despite a seriously bad accident.  Surprising about the inability to extract the life raft - but easy to overreact on that I guess, I guess the random position of the broken mast and spreader impeding access is a 1:10000 sorta thing.  I doubt there's any way the rule-makers could make it totally foolproof

But given today's construction methods and some simple changes to design requirements it ought to be relatively straightforward to make a Class 40 essentially unsinkable and that might be something useful for rule-makers to consider.  Ditto IMOCA.

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On 1/15/2020 at 3:18 AM, DickDastardly said:

Says they got pooped by a big wave out of the blue while a drop in wind speed and shift in wind direction had them sailing low and slow (the autopilot's wind mode being out of action, they were sailing in compass mode).  Surprised that the boat filled up so quickly unless the cockpit floor or some other structural member failed and a torrent poured in.  There's a lot of volume inside these boats.

I don't know how much water the ballast tanks hold, but they might play a role if something punctured them? 

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