Jump to content

Retirement Planning


Recommended Posts

So sorry BFM, don't give up hope. 

IB's outcome was actually sub-optimal, as he ended up sailing with a Dickweed after all of that work and effort.

Bryan, I suspect that Keith is on a similar program to me. He's an owner and founder of the business. In my case, the work is a lot of fun, pays absurdly well, and if I don't have this office I'm nothing but Beth's bitch. I also never really wanted to cruise full time, as I have another life in the mountains. Headed to the Kootenays this week for 6 days of Heliskiing, just spent most of 3 weeks in Taos getting in shape. I'm 65 and still doing deals with 30-35 year producing lives. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/15/2020 at 12:39 PM, B.J. Porter said:

We've been officially Floridians since 2012, yeah it works OK.

 

Words I never ever thought I would see coming out of BJ's mouth... :lol:

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/12/2020 at 9:46 PM, B.J. Porter said:

Pre-tax retirement dollars which will change our picture once we can take it without penalty..

how does this work?

my understanding is that pre-tax money is subject to tax upon withdrawal..

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

So sorry BFM, don't give up hope. 

IB's outcome was actually sub-optimal, as he ended up sailing with a Dickweed after all of that work and effort.

Bryan, I suspect that Keith is on a similar program to me. He's an owner and founder of the business. In my case, the work is a lot of fun, pays absurdly well, and if I don't have this office I'm nothing but Beth's bitch. I also never really wanted to cruise full time, as I have another life in the mountains. Headed to the Kootenays this week for 6 days of Heliskiing, just spent most of 3 weeks in Taos getting in shape. I'm 65 and still doing deals with 30-35 year producing lives. 

CL, from what I've seen you've done it right, you're enjoying life tremendously and from what I've seen of KDH's  posts he's in the same boat "so to speak".

The missus and I have always wanted to cruise so this is a fantastic opportunity for us.  We're having fun and will continue on untill it's time to do some thing else.   I've always believed choices are give and get, not really right or wrong.  Just a fork in the road kind of thing.  

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, floater said:
On 2/13/2020 at 12:46 AM, B.J. Porter said:

Pre-tax retirement dollars which will change our picture once we can take it without penalty..

how does this work?

my understanding is that pre-tax money is subject to tax upon withdrawal..

That's correct, at the moment, but potentially subject to change.

One thing that is also currently true, is that dollars saved pre-tax will get taxed as income, according to the rate determined by your income during the year of withdrawal. That could well be an advantage, but more likely not

- DSK

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:
9 hours ago, floater said:
On 2/13/2020 at 6:46 PM, B.J. Porter said:

Pre-tax retirement dollars which will change our picture once we can take it without penalty..

how does this work?

my understanding is that pre-tax money is subject to tax upon withdrawal..

That's correct, at the moment, but potentially subject to change.

One thing that is also currently true, is that dollars saved pre-tax will get taxed as income, according to the rate determined by your income during the year of withdrawal. That could well be an advantage, but more likely not

- DSK

Totally depends. I think the theory is you save during your peak earning (and taxing years), so when you pull it out again you have less income.

I know for us, most of it got put away when we were in the top tax marginal bracket, so it should make a difference in the long run unless they up the brackets or we start making a wildly unexpected income in our golden years. Who knows, maybe one of my novels will sell...

Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

That's correct, at the moment, but potentially subject to change.

One thing that is also currently true, is that dollars saved pre-tax will get taxed as income, according to the rate determined by your income during the year of withdrawal. That could well be an advantage, but more likely not

- DSK

Can be a risky choice. But working sweet for me. Socked away the max pre-tax money during career as engineer. All in was in risky tech stocks traded with tax free (deferred) gains. Now on SS and technically in IRS poverty household. Heh. Silly. IRA distributions, if moderate, taxed very little. But pay regular income tax rates on gains vs. lower capital gains taxes...so tough to predict the big picture.

But even deferred taxes might be worth it ... time value of money and all.

The 401k was kinda a ripoff because the admin fees are extraordinary unless profit sharing makes it obviously worthwhile. Which is rare.

Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, El Boracho said:

The 401k was kinda a ripoff because the admin fees are extraordinary unless profit sharing makes it obviously worthwhile. Which is rare.

Safe Harbor is your friend, if you're a principal.

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Innocent Bystander said:

Sorry to hear the news.  More of us are fighting the odds each year. It’s been 3 years since a backache turned into 18 months of doctors, chemo, radiation, surgery and then more chemo for me. Next week is another scan to confirm the “cancer free” pronouncement still stands. Chemo sucks but attitude counts. So does getting the right medical team. My initial round of tests ended with a Friday afternoon phone call telling me my tumor was inoperable and I had less than a year to live. Second opinions and making sure you are a full partner in the medical decisions are a good thing. Took my oncologist a couple of months to get used to me walking in having read the papers and knowing the treatment alternatives and side effects. As I told him “you may be the expert, but it’s my life.”  

Sorry about your news as well.  

My CT scan is next week as well.  Good luck with your scan!!!

Agreed about the medical team.  My second opinion is the one that saved my life I think.  The doctor grabbed me and said "You are going to fucking beat this!"  Totally changed my attitude from woe is me to Fuck cancer!  My radiation oncologist is another one who, well, I tear up when I think about it...he is an amazing doctor.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Beer fueled Mayhem said:

Sorry about your news as well.  

My CT scan is next week as well.  Good luck with your scan!!!

Agreed about the medical team.  My second opinion is the one that saved my life I think.  The doctor grabbed me and said "You are going to fucking beat this!"  Totally changed my attitude from woe is me to Fuck cancer!  My radiation oncologist is another one who, well, I tear up when I think about it...he is an amazing doctor.

Completely normal and agree. My second surgeon walked into the room and started with “We can beat this. Won’t be quick or easy but nothing we can’t handle.”  Between him and the oncologist, working in 2 different cities (NY and DC), they gave me my life back. I got to greet my first grandchild mid treatment and will dance with my daughters and my bride at my youngest daughter’s wedding in November. Had a great Bermuda race last summer with a 30 hour match race that we won by 9 seconds at the finish. If that’s all I get, then that’s enough. 

A couple of months after I finished my last chemo, CL dragged me to Newport to drive his boat in the Panerai Classic. I was exhausted at the end of each day but it really got me started on “life after cancer.”  For a Dickweed, he’s pretty solid. 

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hang in there and keep your dobber up guys.  Do what you gotta do and keep a positive attitude. I'm a stage 3 survivor, was supposed to be on the Bermuda race with another poster here but got sliced and diced and irradiated instead.  

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Innocent Bystander said:

Completely normal and agree. My second surgeon walked into the room and started with “We can beat this. Won’t be quick or easy but nothing we can’t handle.”  Between him and the oncologist, working in 2 different cities (NY and DC), they gave me my life back. I got to greet my first grandchild mid treatment and will dance with my daughters and my bride at my youngest daughter’s wedding in November. Had a great Bermuda race last summer with a 30 hour match race that we won by 9 seconds at the finish. If that’s all I get, then that’s enough. 

A couple of months after I finished my last chemo, CL dragged me to Newport to drive his boat in the Panerai Classic. I was exhausted at the end of each day but it really got me started on “life after cancer.”  For a Dickweed, he’s pretty solid. 

We fired my partner's oncologist, who couldn't spare more than four minutes to discuss her recurrent ovarian cancer diagnosis, its prognosis, or her treatment options with risk/benefits of each, then how we are going to fit treatment into our busy & disconnected lives. He just dropped a chemo and radiation(?) schedule on us from on high. Then he got pissy & borderline abusive when she said: "I need these five questions answered before I consent to this treatment plan, which is wildly different from the last round & which other doctors say makes no sense. Also, one of the drugs you prescribe tends to kill people suddenly, which we never discussed." Four minutes with your oncologist twice a year is plenty when everything is going swell; when cancer comes back, you need a doctor who will slow the world down for you.

So I just flew into Flagstaff and we drove to the Mayo in PHX & found a new oncologist who did her homework, explained the situation, gave us treatment options (with +/- of each), and helped us work out a schedule we can (probably) manage. It's a brutal regime & I'll be moving to AZ til May to provide ground crew, but it sounds right to us and we at least feel this new medical team is on her side. 

Sometimes 'retirement planning' turns into 'hope we live til retirement' planning, and that series of five-year boat refit/cruising deferrals maybe wasn't a great idea. :(

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Diarmuid said:

We fired my partner's oncologist, who couldn't spare more than four minutes to discuss her recurrent ovarian cancer diagnosis, its prognosis, or her treatment options with risk/benefits of each, then how we are going to fit treatment into our busy & disconnected lives. He just dropped a chemo and radiation(?) schedule on us from on high. Then he got pissy & borderline abusive when she said: "I need these five questions answered before I consent to this treatment plan, which is wildly different from the last round & which other doctors say makes no sense. Also, one of the drugs you prescribe tends to kill people suddenly, which we never discussed." Four minutes with your oncologist twice a year is plenty when everything is going swell; when cancer comes back, you need a doctor who will slow the world down for you.

So I just flew into Flagstaff and we drove to the Mayo in PHX & found a new oncologist who did her homework, explained the situation, gave us treatment options (with +/- of each), and helped us work out a schedule we can (probably) manage. It's a brutal regime & I'll be moving to AZ til May to provide ground crew, but it sounds right to us and we at least feel this new medical team is on her side. 

Sometimes 'retirement planning' turns into 'hope we live til retirement' planning, and that series of five-year boat refit/cruising deferrals maybe wasn't a great idea. :(

 

D.

Sometimes you have to fire the Doc.  My local oncologist is a great guy and communicated very well, including apologizing for sending me to the "wrong surgeon" at first.  My course of treatment (high dose, inpatient chemo for a large rare retroperitoneal  Ewing's Sarcoma) was more than our local hospital was able to handle and he felt it better if I went to a nationally known specialist in DC but cautioned me that he had a personality that some folks had trouble with.  It took a couple of visits for the specialist and me to come to a understanding of how the relationship was going to work.  I trusted him to choose the best treatment plan.  He had to answer my questions thoroughly.  As you are clearly aware, a bad prognosis can give you a lot of time from 1-4 AM to do research online.  Once I showed him that I had read and understood the papers (including one of his) he got better at "sharing."  By the end, I'd walk in and he would ask "So, how are we this week?" since i had the blood counts before he did.  

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I think one thing is missing in this discussion is that cruising as an extended life style fundamentally makes no logical sense (but considerable sense in other respects of course). Hence it makes little sense to apply too much logic with respect to things like financial planning. Too many things just can get in the way - health as we have seen, financial reverses, unexpected boat costs (a simple one, you decide to go the Med (expensive) rather than saying in the Caribbean. In our case we were living on the boat in NYC with my wife working in a financial company and earning good money (that I spent on the boat) when she was laid off after the financial collapse and we off cruising 18 months sooner than expected. It worked out just fine and we never really went back to looking at the the planning spreadsheet again.

Someone mentioned thinking about a boat in 38 to 45 foot range.That is a huge range and covers an enormous range of boats. The costs (purchase/upgrade/maintenance) could vary enormously. Cruising boats tend to be sold by the pound, not the foot.

Best of luck to those facing health issues.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Great thread. My wife and I are empty nesters, 58, have our 4000 sq ft home (in which we raised our kids and is way too big for two) for sale, a buyer for our business and a plan to cruise for a year or so. I say “or so” because we want to be open to continuing if it goes well. We sail a lot on our boat, charter in the BVI’s frequently and have made many offshore passages.  

At some point we plan to come back, downsize to a small home, condo or apartment and start another company to work until we can’t stand it.

BJ, I’d like to chat with you sometime. We’ve looked at several larger bluewater boats like Stevens 47 Amel 46 and others. Heck, I’d be fine taking off in our paid for and restored Ericson 32 for the start but my wife insists we need more space. Your reply about having space for guests is right on. Many say they want to come along but very few ever do.

We are literally just the house sale away from implementing our plan but there’s always another thing that pops up. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/13/2020 at 3:26 PM, Zonker said:

Me: "Boss I got ass cancer"

Boss: "Oh shit, sorry to hear that, how can we help etc..."

Me: "Nothing right now. I sure am glad I retired early and went sailing. Don't have too many regrets"

 

At age 29 I quit my job and my wife and I sailed for 4 years in Mexico/Central America.

I went back to work designing for beltway bandits for 1 year, yachts for 3 years, and then back to previous company in Canada for 6 year (so 10 years of working)

At age 43 I quit my job and my wife and kid and I sailed for 8 years around the world.

I went back to my previous company in Canada (this is the 4th time they have re-hired me) at age 51

I found out I had rectal cancer at age 52.

Go now if you're thinking about it. Your health won't get better as you get older and it won't get easier!

 

Just ran across this and very sorry to hear it.  Hopefully caught it early and the prognosis will be good and you will get for another decade of cruising!!

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think schooling for the kids is that hard unless they specific learning disabilities or something like that.

Generally you motivate them by saying "no snorkeling until your biology is done" :)

Most of the families I know would do school in the AM and were done by lunchtime. You don't have to sit beside the children every minute unless they are very young. (Think about your early schooling - it wasn't all the teacher talking; you'd do an assignment, read a book, do an experiment etc.). You don't have to be an expert - I'm useless at biology but learned along with her. I taught math/science/a bit of history and her mom taught english/social studies etc. As an adult you are probably better at researching things. 

     Oh, as a good resource you download a compressed Wikipedia without pictures. Big files but with a fast internet connection you can get it easily. Free.
     The Kahn academy videos are excellent and all free.  There are a ton of resources for teaching kids; the trick is not to get overwhelmed with them.

I think the Calvert system that some kids used was overly restrictive and made much too much use of workbooks in a regimented manner. The kids we saw using it took forever to complete their assignments and would have issues with the teachers marking them if incomplete.

Any curriculum based on regular, fast internet isn't suitable for cruising unless you will only visit countries with cheap 3G packages. These are not that frequent!

Personal anecdote time:

When our daughter was in Grade 3 (first year of cruising) we used the local school board's distance education package (BC has a lot of rural kids so many choices in distance education). They gave us a whole bunch of textbooks, workbooks etc and you sometimes had to mail in assignments. They didn't all get there because mailing from Mexico is a crap shoot. You also had to mail or return back the textbooks - this was OK because we flew back from Mexico for a visit and returned them at the same time.

One assignment that stands out was to create a school newspaper about local events. She was reading a lot of Harry Potter at the time and wanted to create a Hogwarts' newspaper. Unfortunately that wasn't allowed and her creative dreams were dashed (she survived). And she was studying the native peoples of Canada while we visited the ruins of Aztec civilizations and explored the biology of the Baja desert.

But it did emphasize that "school in a box" can be inflexible and not relate to the places you are visiting. Which sucks for learning and enthusiasm of the student.

Next year we bought the prescribed BC school textbooks from a school supply place and just kept them. We would be in French Polynesia in June at the end of the school year and mailing back heavy school textbooks would cost more than just buying them. We didn't follow a formal curriculum but did have specific subject areas she had to study (math, biology/geology/physics, english composition, english literature, history).  It made more sense to study the history of F.Polynesia while we were there, and field trips consisted of exploring the ancient ruins in the Marquesas - or learning about shark's habits. Although she did develop a hatred of Captain Cook because he anchored EVERYWHERE and she got tired of him popping up in history etc...  

The following year she entered the Australian school system for ~2 years. 1-1/2 year in elementary and 1/2 year in high school. She did very well because she was so self motivated and just got on with her work. She was amazed at how much time was wasted on busy work, keeping the class quiet. Got very high marks in standardized tests but she is a bright kid.

We got some local school textbooks when leaving Oz and picked up more textbooks in the Seychelles. These were the IGESC which I recommend highly. They are an internationally recognized secondary schooling standard as part of a ~2 year program for 14-16 year olds. More here:

https://www.cambridge.org/ca/education/qualification/cambridge-international/cambridge-igcse

When returned to BC, she did one year in local Grade 11 and didn't like it. Kids were too superficial, not very friendly.

So she began a 2 year International Baccalaureate program (sort of grade 11/12/13 depending on your age) in a school in eSwatini (used to be called Swaziland). Very well regarded school in southern Africa. Nelson Mandela's kids went there. First racially integrated high school in the era of apartheid. Anyway she likes it a lot, finds it very challenging and has friends from all over the world. This school is one of 18 United World Colleges.  https://www.uwc.org/

 

<Thanks all for the good wishes for cancer treatment - I'll know more in April after a followup CAT scan to see if it has spread further>

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

To Zonks, Beer, IB, and anyone else out there fighting the big C, know the rest of us are thinking of you, and pulling for you. Should you need something, I'm sure as a community, we can do something to help...

Crash

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, Crash said:

To Zonks, Beer, IB, and anyone else out there fighting the big C, know the rest of us are thinking of you, and pulling for you. Should you need something, I'm sure as a community, we can do something to help...

Crash

What he said. This thread had some great info and some bad news too.  Best wishes to all fighting forward.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/17/2020 at 6:17 AM, Bryanjb said:

It would be good if Keith popped in and commented, I believe he worked with Bogle.  Keith is the pro here.

I likely have nothing that you guys don't already know. But I'll parrot the ideas that diversification and paying low fees and not trading in and out are the keys to success. Stock index funds. Doesn't really matter which ones. Average in as stocks always seem expensive and it makes buying easier. Sell only when you need the cash.

I'm just a math guy that picks stocks for a living, not a financial advisor, but I've never met one who knows any more than you guys.

I had the big C when I was 18. Hodgkins 1B. Quite curable even back in 1980. I know IBs cancer story pretty well--his approach really impressed me.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/19/2020 at 5:58 PM, Woods Rider said:

Great thread. My wife and I are empty nesters, 58, have our 4000 sq ft home (in which we raised our kids and is way too big for two) for sale, a buyer for our business and a plan to cruise for a year or so. I say “or so” because we want to be open to continuing if it goes well. We sail a lot on our boat, charter in the BVI’s frequently and have made many offshore passages.  

At some point we plan to come back, downsize to a small home, condo or apartment and start another company to work until we can’t stand it.

BJ, I’d like to chat with you sometime. We’ve looked at several larger bluewater boats like Stevens 47 Amel 46 and others. Heck, I’d be fine taking off in our paid for and restored Ericson 32 for the start but my wife insists we need more space. Your reply about having space for guests is right on. Many say they want to come along but very few ever do.

We are literally just the house sale away from implementing our plan but there’s always another thing that pops up. 

Have I got a GREAT boat for you...already in the South Pacific...

But seriously, reach out any time. PM me if you want to swap e-mails.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, kdh said:

But I'll parrot the ideas that diversification and paying low fees and not trading in and out are the keys to success. Stock index funds.

This is what I've been doing the last few years. I've been steering clear of individual stocks for some time.

Index funds took it in the shorts yesterday, though...

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/20/2020 at 6:27 AM, floater said:
On 2/19/2020 at 2:29 PM, Bristol-Cruiser said:

I think one thing is missing in this discussion ..

school for the kids. imo, teaching the kids by far the biggest hurdle for full time cruising - given kids are involved. oof..

No, not really.

School was hassle, and it took a lot of time. But both of my kids are rather perfectionists and strongly motivated students, so that contributed and we planned poorly around some internet based classes one year.

But on the whole it was not anywhere close to a deal breaker, and not as hard as it made out to be. They did well, and had zero problems getting into college. We did AP classes, Calculus, etc. etc.

We used a curriculum from Keystone Online, which worked well for most courses. We're not teachers, but I do have a B.S. in biology and my wife double-majored in applied math/biology before going to medical school. So we're educated and my wife thinks advanced math is fun, so that helps.

I think those that have trouble are the ones who 1) try to do it without a curriculum at all (a good one isn't free, but it's a fraction of the cost of private school) or 2) don't establish it as a priority with the kids. We did school first in the morning, before fun time. We planned "breaks" and "vacations" for fun stuff and excursions around it, and you have the flexibility to do it.

Of course, you do have "teen dynamics" at play, but honestly I think the dynamic changes greatly when you are on boat life than on land in school with a peer group. So much is different with your relationship with your kids when it's on the boat sailing together instead of seeing them in the morning, then at dinner when they're not doing homework. You see each other in a different light.

We did grades 10-12 with Will, our oldest, who has graduated in 2018 with "first honours" from Southampton Solent and is off working as a designer at Betts Boats.

Grades 7-12 with Danielle, who is now a sophomore at Bucknell sporting a 3.97 GPA or something ridiculous like that. She was accepted to all eleven schools she applied to.

So...no troubles with being prepared for college. In fact, both kids thought the self-direction and self-motivation they needed to do the Keystone program on the boat helped them in school.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/20/2020 at 7:47 AM, Zonker said:

I think the Calvert system that some kids used was overly restrictive and made much too much use of workbooks in a regimented manner. The kids we saw using it took forever to complete their assignments and would have issues with the teachers marking them if incomplete.

Any curriculum based on regular, fast internet isn't suitable for cruising unless you will only visit countries with cheap 3G packages. These are not that frequent!

We did Calvert for middle school. It was...OK. Keystone for high school was better.

Definitely spot on the internet. We had a problen with that in 2014, when the school really didn't understand what we were discussing or how their own software worked in practice. We limited on-line classes to only those that weren't available on paper, and didn't do more than one or two of those at a time.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/20/2020 at 7:47 AM, Zonker said:

But it did emphasize that "school in a box" can be inflexible and not relate to the places you are visiting. Which sucks for learning and enthusiasm of the student.

This was one of our bitches about the curricula, the only downside. They weren't SO fixed that you couldn't work things in, and many of the biology projects and papers and stuff like that integrated with life.

But you can't really integrate a literature or math course into the real world anyway.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

Index funds took it in the shorts yesterday, though...

That is because I bought a S&P 500 fund last week. I had been waiting for the coronovirus to affect stocks prices and then buy. Apparently I was not patient enough by a week.

However this is for retirement funding so I will ignore it for a few years and see how it is doing then.

Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Zonker said:

That is because I bought a S&P 500 fund last week. I had been waiting for the coronovirus to affect stocks prices and then buy. Apparently I was not patient enough by a week.

However this is for retirement funding so I will ignore it for a few years and see how it is doing then.

It could be worse, Zonk. The bottom is still a long way down...

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Zonker said:
5 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

Index funds took it in the shorts yesterday, though...

That is because I bought a S&P 500 fund last week. I had been waiting for the coronovirus to affect stocks prices and then buy. Apparently I was not patient enough by a week.

However this is for retirement funding so I will ignore it for a few years and see how it is doing then.

You can still average down, if you're contributing monthly. Quarterly is tougher.

Indexes are very successful and there's dozens to choose from. I like a raw materials index fund, energy sector, an REIT or at least a real estate fund, better yet one commercial/industrial and one residential real estate fund, and one or two others you like. Plot a 10 year price range for each, and every month buy the one that is lowest against it's range.

This is not something I invented, it's a variation on a strategy called "Dogs Of The Dow" which goes back to when the Dow Jones was the leading investment index. Fromt eh mid-1970s up thru the early 2000s, this netted just below a 15% average annual return.

- DSK

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...
On 2/25/2020 at 1:37 PM, B.J. Porter said:

No, not really.

School was hassle, and it took a lot of time. But both of my kids are rather perfectionists and strongly motivated students, so that contributed and we planned poorly around some internet based classes one year.

But on the whole it was not anywhere close to a deal breaker, and not as hard as it made out to be. They did well, and had zero problems getting into college. We did AP classes, Calculus, etc. etc.

We used a curriculum from Keystone Online, which worked well for most courses. We're not teachers, but I do have a B.S. in biology and my wife double-majored in applied math/biology before going to medical school. So we're educated and my wife thinks advanced math is fun, so that helps.

I think those that have trouble are the ones who 1) try to do it without a curriculum at all (a good one isn't free, but it's a fraction of the cost of private school) or 2) don't establish it as a priority with the kids. We did school first in the morning, before fun time. We planned "breaks" and "vacations" for fun stuff and excursions around it, and you have the flexibility to do it.

Of course, you do have "teen dynamics" at play, but honestly I think the dynamic changes greatly when you are on boat life than on land in school with a peer group. So much is different with your relationship with your kids when it's on the boat sailing together instead of seeing them in the morning, then at dinner when they're not doing homework. You see each other in a different light.

We did grades 10-12 with Will, our oldest, who has graduated in 2018 with "first honours" from Southampton Solent and is off working as a designer at Betts Boats.

Grades 7-12 with Danielle, who is now a sophomore at Bucknell sporting a 3.97 GPA or something ridiculous like that. She was accepted to all eleven schools she applied to.

So...no troubles with being prepared for college. In fact, both kids thought the self-direction and self-motivation they needed to do the Keystone program on the boat helped them in school.

funny thing is - when I wrote this, the question was purely academic. now I just spent a week home-schooling my kids.. It went fine. thanks for the info.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I just got sort of caught up on this thread, and was quite moved by the quiet courage of those of our little community who are dealing with cancer and cancer treatments. Mrs. Bull and I, both 71, have been fortunate to have avoided this, however, we have friends who have not. I wish all of you the best. Be careful in these strange times we are going through.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...