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Farr 920 - US Watercraft auction

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I bought the Farr 920 that was in the US Watercraft bankruptcy auction a couple of years ago. I'm finally getting ready to splash it. 

I'm looking to get some provenance on the boat/find previous owners.  I met a guy at the auction (Brian I believe) who had owned the boat previously, unfortunately I lost his number. It had also been subsequently owned by someone who worked at Hall Spars.

Anyone got any info to share with me?

Thanks

20171111_111544.jpg

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Someone better than me can link to the other thread.

Looks like one of the ones built in NZ 76/77 but made obsolete by the centreboard boats - Swuzzlebubble, Waverider etc.

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Compass Yachts in Canada built at least one of this design, with the intent of a production run.  If its glass this could be one of those.

 

The one I am familiar with originally had an omc saildrive, and the rudder was less elliptical than yours.

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Some useful info on the 920. 
Raced on and against one back in the early eighties. Stood up most 3/4 tonners.

http://www.farrdesign.com/54.html

http://rbsailing.blogspot.com/2012/09/featured-yacht-1-farr-920.html

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What do you Want to know?

Design 54, was Fresh water boat from Tennessee.  Came to NE and then raced locally and key west RW And Charleston  RW

need light 1, heavy 1 and 3.   Two Kites and sail to victory.  Sweet boat, out sailed the rating downwind

broken mast led it to be owned by hall spar employee where they put alerion rig in.  Never sailed by them and sat at waterline for at least 6 years. 
 

keel grid area was reinforced at some point.  Rudder modification was done in 90’s.  Many of the 30’s had simile rudder mod done

Where is boat now?  Condition? Selling?

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23 hours ago, crashtestdummy said:

What do you Want to know?

Design 54, was Fresh water boat from Tennessee.  Came to NE and then raced locally and key west RW And Charleston  RW

need light 1, heavy 1 and 3.   Two Kites and sail to victory.  Sweet boat, out sailed the rating downwind

broken mast led it to be owned by hall spar employee where they put alerion rig in.  Never sailed by them and sat at waterline for at least 6 years. 
 

keel grid area was reinforced at some point.  Rudder modification was done in 90’s.  Many of the 30’s had simile rudder mod done 

Where is boat now?  Condition? Selling? 

Hey, I have the same boat and been pondering for a long time whether to do a rudder modification (remove skeg, fit a jefa rudder). However, i've always had my doubts regarding the improvements that it may bring to the boat's performance. I would be very interested to hear the opinion of anyone that has made the modification!

 

Regards,

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9 hours ago, reinax said:

Hey, I have the same boat and been pondering for a long time whether to do a rudder modification (remove skeg, fit a jefa rudder). However, i've always had my doubts regarding the improvements that it may bring to the boat's performance. I would be very interested to hear the opinion of anyone that has made the modification!

 

Regards,

Don't have the boat or done such modifications - but I'll throw my 2 cents in anyways:

The Jefa rudders tend to be on the thick side.  The part of their web-site showing the rudder details is under construction so I'm relying on my recollection here but I think their rudders typically have about a 14% t/c ratio for the racing rudders and 18% for the cruising variants.

The elliptical rudder shown in an earlier post certainly looks its age i.e. 1990s.  Way too much blade volume up top.

Now the original 920 had a fair amount of blade volume up top as well (see drawing below), but the skeg created a fairly smooth volume transition.  Of course it also allowed for a bit of jigging around with the IOR Rated Length.

With an exposed spade rudder like in the earlier post, you have a sudden change in volume creating a small secondary wave - like the situation you get with an outboard rudder.  Minimizing the rudder volume near the root diminishes that wave, but the elliptical one in the photo looks pretty voluminous at the root.

A similar thing happens at the keel root and is known as interference drag which is one of the reasons keels today are so thin and have minimal span at the root.  it may be called the same thing with the rudder, but I've never heard it referred to as that.

Personally, i wouldn't monkey around with something Farr has done because he usually gets it right in the first place.  Except maybe for sail area - unless you live in an area where you typically have a lot of breeze - like New Zealand.  In PNW, a 920 would need a LOT more SA.

farr_920_drawing.jpg

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On ‎2‎/‎3‎/‎2020 at 10:16 PM, 12 metre said:

Don't have the boat or done such modifications - but I'll throw my 2 cents in anyways:

The Jefa rudders tend to be on the thick side.  The part of their web-site showing the rudder details is under construction so I'm relying on my recollection here but I think their rudders typically have about a 14% t/c ratio for the racing rudders and 18% for the cruising variants.

The elliptical rudder shown in an earlier post certainly looks its age i.e. 1990s.  Way too much blade volume up top.

Now the original 920 had a fair amount of blade volume up top as well (see drawing below), but the skeg created a fairly smooth volume transition.  Of course it also allowed for a bit of jigging around with the IOR Rated Length.

With an exposed spade rudder like in the earlier post, you have a sudden change in volume creating a small secondary wave - like the situation you get with an outboard rudder.  Minimizing the rudder volume near the root diminishes that wave, but the elliptical one in the photo looks pretty voluminous at the root.

A similar thing happens at the keel root and is known as interference drag which is one of the reasons keels today are so thin and have minimal span at the root.  it may be called the same thing with the rudder, but I've never heard it referred to as that. 

Personally, i wouldn't monkey around with something Farr has done because he usually gets it right in the first place.  Except maybe for sail area - unless you live in an area where you typically have a lot of breeze - like New Zealand.  In PNW, a 920 would need a LOT more SA. 

farr_920_drawing.jpg

Hey,

Thanks for your reply. I also second your conservative approach.

However, the profile drawing doesn't really show the skeg and rudder volume of the original design.

Maybe the attached picture would give a better idea. I never measured, but i bet the top width of the original rudder is around 20cm wide.

I'm sure interference drag is unfavorable, but there is just a whole lot of skeg and rudder volume going on down there ( http://www.histoiredeshalfs.com/E117 Farther Bruin.htm )

20170713_200713.jpg

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5 hours ago, reinax said:

Hey,

Thanks for your reply. I also second your conservative approach.

However, the profile drawing doesn't really show the skeg and rudder volume of the original design.

Maybe the attached picture would give a better idea. I never measured, but i bet the top width of the original rudder is around 20cm wide.

I'm sure interference drag is unfavorable, but there is just a whole lot of skeg and rudder volume going on down there ( http://www.histoiredeshalfs.com/E117 Farther Bruin.htm )

20170713_200713.jpg

Which was what you would want under IOR.  I won't get into the details of how it all worked under IOR, but it gave you a bit more unmeasured underwater volume in the stern area and in theory a bit of extra sailing length.

You will note it looks like the rudder thins down quite a bit around the skeg notch.  If you visualize the rudder in place in the skeg slot in the linked photos of Farther Bruin you can see how the top of the rudder is effectively an extension of the skeg.  Since there is no "leading edge" above the notch, that part of the rudder is more of a trim trab/canoe body extension.

The main point of my previous post was that if you want to remove the skeg, pick a rudder with minimal root volume, unlike the elliptical rudder pictured in an earlier post.

 

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On 2/24/2020 at 4:05 PM, Schnick said:

Compass Yachts in Canada built at least one of this design, with the intent of a production run.  If its glass this could be one of those.

 

The one I am familiar with originally had an omc saildrive, and the rudder was less elliptical than yours.

Shenanigans?

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2 hours ago, Nice! said:

Shenanigans?

I think Schnick is referring to Farr Out, which was a Farr 914 - https://sailboatdata.com/sailboat/farr-914-12-ton

Not all that similar to the 920.  Longer LWL with shorter overhangs and more of a vertical transom.  The Sailboatdata link says 1/2 Ton, but I doubt it since she would likely have a much longer Rated Length due to the LWL.  She did not have the typical Farr IOR look of the era.

I looked at Farr Out in the late 80s, but the interior finish was kind of rough with lots of exposed wiring, etc.  One look at the rig and I figured she would not do well in PNW. I ended up buying my first Hotfoot 27 a couple of weeks later, which was a good decision.   The Hotfoot had the same size rig but had 4 ft less LWL and weighed over a ton less.

Shenanigans is likely a 920.   She was originally named The Third Witch (MacBeth).  She was kind of for sale when I went over to view Farr Out,  but she had an outboard strapped to the stern and again, the rig looked small for PNW conditions.

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