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Phattassedoldmanjustcantgetbackonhisboathelpme


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OK.  Perhaps I was overly optimistic.  Thought the MegaByte is the cat's meow for old Keelhauler looking for some board boat action without the painful swim in cold lake waters.  Wrong.  First time out.  Flip, flop and splash.  OK.  I've got this. 3mm neoprene life jacket, etc.  Light winds, coolish water, no chop.  20 minutes later.  Managed to at least right the gawddamned beast.  Now.  The hard part.  Getting back onboard.  Its got built in grab handle mounted inside back of cockpit.  Well, that's fine if your 6.2+.  Short little fckr?  Sorry!

 

OK.  Try the gunwale, either side.  Flip. Over.  Nope.

OK.  How bout bow?  Nope. Too pointy slippery.

OK.  puff! Puff! How bout transom?  Nope.  Too high, too slippery.

O shit.  Mile back to marina, upside-down.  

Hello power boater? Thank god.  Barely got back onboard.

 

DAY TWO

Out with pal on his RS.  Two hours of glorious sailing.  The little bitch be fast!  Back at marina, rig a transom rope ladder.  Then test the Megabyte recovery boarding versus RS.  Megabyte: no fckn way @ all.  RS: piece of cake first time.  WTF.

OK.  So.  What to do?  I've seen all the pipe ladders, etc.  No gonna work for me?  Thinking stainless mounted on transom hull.  Hate looking like a fracking Arkie on the water, but help. 

Suggesty?  Recommendy?

 

 

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Make the grabhandle reachable somehow - add a rope+hose handle in a spot you can actually reach. And then practice. What seems nearly impossible will become piece of cake with a modest amount of practice.

Of course practice with a friend nearby, on / near ramp, whatever makes it safe and low stress.

 

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47 minutes ago, martin 'hoff said:

Make the grabhandle reachable somehow - add a rope+hose handle in a spot you can actually reach. And then practice. What seems nearly impossible will become piece of cake with a modest amount of practice.

Of course practice with a friend nearby, on / near ramp, whatever makes it safe and low stress.

 

A reasonable rationale approach.  Thanks

 

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Have your support team take care of the issue. 

 

24 minutes ago, JimBowie said:

A reasonable rationale approach.  Thanks

 

 

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The first thing is whether you can climb on the centreboard, which then makes getting in straightforward. But I've run into this with a vintage Moth where it was impossible to get on the centreboard without the boat coming upright due to excess helm weight, and then as soon as you tried getting in over the windward side the weight of the rig would bring it over on top, but I'd imagine the Megabyte to be much more stable. 


I'm not quite clear what the problem is with getting in over the windward gunwhale. If its coming over on top of you can you reach mainsheet tail and grab a little bit of main to balance? It will help if the rudder is elasticated so it tends to stay roughly centred.

The other thing I'd suggest is not to try climbing vertically into the boat, try and do a beached whale impression and go in horizontally, with legs at water level then you can grab various stuff on the way in to get across the boat as fast as possible, then sort yourself out once in. Of course reachable grab handle is an immense help.
 

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Make a couple of hand-hold size loops out of small stuff cordage and seize them to the boat's painter. After launch, run the painter back to the cockpit and tie it to a suitable location. After an out-of-boat experience, get to the pointy end, where your substantial weight on the bow will lessen the distance between the water and boats deck. Use the rope grab handles to gracefully seal-like your way aboard. 

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Drill a hole in the gunwale and dead end maybe 4' of 1/4" spectra in the hole and tie a bowline to the hiking strap track car. This is what the Finn masters do. Then you have a loop you can stick your foot through and push yourself up, the big muscles in your thighs and calves are way stronger than your shoulders and don't get tired as easily after righting a boat.

(see attached).

geezerstirrups.png

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1 hour ago, JimC said:

The first thing is whether you can climb on the centreboard, which then makes getting in straightforward. But I've run into this with a vintage Moth where it was impossible to get on the centreboard without the boat coming upright due to excess helm weight, and then as soon as you tried getting in over the windward side the weight of the rig would bring it over on top, but I'd imagine the Megabyte to be much more stable. 


I'm not quite clear what the problem is with getting in over the windward gunwhale. If its coming over on top of you can you reach mainsheet tail and grab a little bit of main to balance? It will help if the rudder is elasticated so it tends to stay roughly centred.

The other thing I'd suggest is not to try climbing vertically into the boat, try and do a beached whale impression and go in horizontally, with legs at water level then you can grab various stuff on the way in to get across the boat as fast as possible, then sort yourself out once in. Of course reachable grab handle is an immense help.
 

This,. Throw a leg on the side and try to tilt the boat toward you and then see if you can grab the cockpit side. I do this on the laser. Also when you go over try to roll on your stomach and go over the back instead of going in the water. I know , its not always possible and your already in the water and have to get back on, but ounce or prevention and all that.

Rope above might also be a good solution. I get back on the 505 using the trap handles throw my legs over and lift my self up till my butt can hit then slide in. Or get on the board and step in when the boat comes up. 

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"

6 hours ago, JimC said:

The other thing I'd suggest is not to try climbing vertically into the boat, try and do a beached whale impression and go in horizontally, with legs at water level then you can grab various stuff on the way in to get across the boat as fast as possible, then sort yourself out once in. Of course reachable grab handle is an immense help.
 

 

What I call the seal flop when teaching new sailors

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Once 'talked' an 80 year old woman back into an Opti after she had fallen into the water getting on to the dock. Salty Sisters women's sailing Wednesday morning.

The trick was to 'kiss the bottom of the boat' after pulling down on the sides and thereby pulling down on the boat. Gymnist trick. Head down.

She flopped into the boat and came up with a big grin. We all applauded. Dave Ellis

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Right boat. 

Get oriented approximately on a beam reach by kicking your feet if necessary.

Roll boat to windward, and grab something as far inboard as you can possibly reach.

The hiking straps are a likely target.

Kick your feet as hard as you can and pull yourself as fast as you can toward the middle of the boat.

If the boat rolls on top of you before you try to board, trim the sail a bit to provide counter force.

Unlike getting out of a pool, the goal is not just get to the edge, but to get over the center of buoyancy which is , for this exercise can be considered the middle of the boat.

SHC

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