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Cruising Quarantine Issues RE Covid-19


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The "Sailing Kittiwake" kids (Youtube) set off from the Canaries a little less than 2 weeks ago, expecting to land in Guadeloupe. They shut down so their next target was Grenada. That shut down, so their next target is the Grenadines. They are pretty close to land, and running low on food.

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Seems fair.  Friends who were in the Galapagos just got back to south carolina after two weeks of lockdown in a guyaquil quarantine hotel.  They were told the same thing when the ecuadorians finally agreed to let a couple of planes out.

 

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I have a friend cruising in Luperon, Dominican Republic. As of this weekend they confined all cruisers to their boats. He's sitting tight right now, but his only option soon may be to sail direct back the USA since no other port will accept him. 

 

Update: This morning he said they are now allowed one person from each vessel to go into town to get groceries, medicine, etc. 

 

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Marine and Yachting Advisory for Grenada

 / 21 March 2020 /

Effective 11:59 p.m. on Friday, March 20th, all crew and passengers aboard Pleasure Craft and live-aboard will not be allowed to disembark on the shores of Grenada, Carriacou and Petite Martinique.

All passengers and crew are encouraged to make contact via VHF and follow prescribed procedures for receiving their supplies and fuel, as needed. Prior to 11:59 p.m. on Friday, all vessels already in the State of Grenada will be allowed to remain, but must follow the established health and safety protocols.

According to the Immigration Act of Grenada:-No person shall enter Grenada except at a Port of entry.

A person entering Grenada by sea, shall not disembark without the consent of an Immigration Officer, and the master of a ship shall not allow any person to disembark without such consent.

The Ministry of Health, through the Sanitary Authority says any person who contravenes, or fails or refuses to comply with any of these provisions will be fined or detained.

This advisory is subject to change

https://www.mgovernance.net/marine-and-yachting-advisory-grenada

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Cuba has said all boats must leave or the people must leave the boat.  Cuba Land and Sea on FB.  

**** Alert ****

All Cuban marinas are closing as of midnight tonight 3/23 for the next 30 days. Foreign vessels already in the marinas will be asked to leave Cuba. Crews who are unable or unwilling to move their boats will be asked to leave the marina and seek accommodation elsewhere.

Crews of commercial vessels will be required to remain aboard or be subject to a mandatory 14 day quarantine in an approved facility if they wish to disembark.

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My wife said a bunch of boats left Vista Mar the Marina north of Panama City on the Pac side.  Some tried to return and the marina would not let them in.  Also the big Ancorages in the city are only allowing limited access to the dingy dock.  Noonsite has a update on the Arc Ralley all boats need to go to a marina or haul and the crews repatriate. They have agents sorting it out so there is a maybe albeit expensive option for puddle jumpers.  For anyone trying to get into Panama on the Carribean side the marina staff are very good and all have good relationships with local government.  Juan Ho at Shelter Bay outside of Colon.  Luis Fabian at Bocas Marina and TC at Red Frog marina.  Red frog has lots of room, Shelter Bay is usually full but have a large yard.  Roger at panamacruisersconnection is a great resource for current information as well. Not sure what the current status is with arriving boats but any of the marinas will know.

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My wife used to write for Noonsite and was the N. America / Caribbean editor.  Recently they asked her to help out again because the situation in msny countries was changing several times a day. World ARC stopped in Grenada,  won't cross Pacific, lots of countries are closing their borders. Shitty time to be cruising 

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I just bailed on Panama on Tuesday because I feared what happened yesterday, which is closing the international airport at Tokumen with almost no notice. I believe Shelter Bay marina was closed last weekend, confirmed by email from Juan. My boat is in a small marina east of the canal called Panamarina, and they and neighboring larger Linton Bay marinas remain open as far as I know. But everyone is stuck because they cannot go anywhere, not San Blas, not the Bocas, and no other country. My only real option was to sail to Florida non-stop or bail. Canal transit is out given the restrictions they have put in place on both ends, and even if you transited, where are you going to go? Like Zonker says, crappy time for cruising, and I was about to begin my crusing life having bought my boat in November at age 64 and newly retired. I may never get to do the big trip I had planned.

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Bahamas lockdown starting tomorrow at 9am until Mar 31. No entry for any boats. No movement except for essential needs.

We're in Samana, DR under lockdown. Police and army are deployed in the streets and they've been arresting anyone that breaks curfew. All calm for now and hopefully the peace holds.

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We're in Charlotte Amalie, along with about 100 other live aboards.  Most of the islands are not allowing private boats to land.  I think Antigua and maybe St Lucia will allow private vessels but there is a 14 day quarantine aboard your boat. It's changing daily, hard to keep track.  If things don't normalize by mid May we'll head back to the US, hopefully we can carry on with our original plan of heading to Trinidad.  Time will tell.  Strange year.

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My wife and I are full time ctuisers.  On March 6 we flew to the US for a 10 day visit to family.  In a matter of days all of our flights were cancelled, borders closed, and now we don't know when well be able to return to our boat I  Tunisia. 

It's ironic to see the travelers desperate to get back to the US when we're just as desperate to get back to our boat.

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Does anyone know if USVI and Puerto Rico will allow US flagged private vessel (US citizens) in? 

Had some friends use that as a resupply and jump off to get back to the mainland but that was a week or so ago and its sounding like things have changed? 

Asking because I do have intermittent contact with some others who are hoping to use same strategy.  Thank for sharing if anyone has current solid (I realize it changes fast).

Beyond entry, is anyone in USVI now and how is it?  Everyone I talked to there that could get back to the mainland was... but yesterday heard a cruiser say he would prefer to stay there than repatriate to mainland.  Seemed risky but they were closer to the situation on the ground than I am obviously.

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You are still allowed to clear into the USVI normally as US flagged vessel with US citizens - governor is putting in restrictions to shut down tourism but doesn't have authority to shut ports as CBP is federal.  I believe that there are fewer offices open than normal, but have heard that (at least yesterday) people were still clearing in with ROAM.

Still probably worth calling ahead to the CBP office you are planning to clear in at before departing wherever your friends are just to confirm given how fast things are changing...

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11 hours ago, Broke down Palace said:

My wife and I are full time ctuisers.  On March 6 we flew to the US for a 10 day visit to family.  In a matter of days all of our flights were cancelled, borders closed, and now we don't know when well be able to return to our boat I  Tunisia. 

It's ironic to see the travelers desperate to get back to the US when we're just as desperate to get back to our boat.

It's a strange time for sure.  I'm very grateful the job I have hasn't been effected, but being several thousand miles away from the family and boat knowing I can't return is tough.  They are safe and I am as well so it's a waiting game for now.  It is definitely going to change our cruising outlook.  Will have to see how it all plays out in various countries. The way the doors were shut with little or no warning is a big reminder that on the foreign flagged pleasure boat you are way down the list as far as national concerns.  We may look to somewhere that has remained relatively open and non restrictive to the foreign boats with some room to move.  Maybe even back up the Mexico.  Lots of uncertainty ahead.

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The US Virgins are chock full of US flagged vessels right now, no charter boats.  Pretty nice.

I think every US sailor in the Caribbean has made an effort to get here.   It's a good vibe.

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52 minutes ago, SASSAFRASS said:

Maybe even back up the Mexico. 

While Mexico hasn't restricted entry into the country, they've restricted cruising. 

Whether that means travel from MX to other countries or within MX is unsure. I will be attempting to learn about this uncertainty.

Some citizens have blocked the DeConcini port of entry (after the inspection station), calling for increased testing of entrants into MX.

Interesting times indeed.

 

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The bug is in the USVI, and community transmission is happening. 17 positives in a population of maybe 125,000, many tests outstanding, waiting for results. Local medical services have been iffy for a long time, and medical professionals here are scared shitless. The situation is changing daily, and quite likely to get more restrictive. There's been a bit of drumbeating re: "sealing out borders," but the stupid f*ckers don't seem to realize that food and medical supplies are all sourced from the mainland. "Non-essential" businesses and govt offices closed, the "vibe" in grocery stores is getting more glum and tense every day, enforcing 6' social distancing in checkout lines - clerks and cashiers wearing masks and gloves.

Elsewhere, good friends were cruising in the Exumas, when they decided to cut things short and return to the US. They stopped in Nassau on Thursday to find 7x24 curfew. They were able to buy groceries and departed yesterday. Said it was like a ghost town.

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7 hours ago, CFS Klopas said:

@eliboat Read this thread about another boat on the same route. French Polynesia isn't allowing anyone in any more, regardless of quarantine.  

https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f168/help-where-to-land-in-the-s-pacific-march-2020-a-231746.html

Thanks for that.  I had read a couple days ago they they had some kind of repatriation system in place, but that might not be a thing anymore.  

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Several boats arrived in Marina Pescaderia from Samana a few days and had no problem entering. We have a friend that will arrive later today.

Our original plan was to spend hurricane season in Grenada but we've decided to return to mainland US in the next month or two. Things are going to get a lot worse in the islands imo.

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9 hours ago, eliboat said:
17 hours ago, CFS Klopas said:

@eliboat Read this thread about another boat on the same route. French Polynesia isn't allowing anyone in any more, regardless of quarantine.  

https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f168/help-where-to-land-in-the-s-pacific-march-2020-a-231746.html

Thanks for that.  I had read a couple days ago they they had some kind of repatriation system in place, but that might not be a thing anymore.   

The latest I've heard is that there are some exceptions being made to allow some boats to stay in FP with a quarantine on them for a couple of weeks.

I think they wanted to store the boats and send everyone home, but most of the flights out are now cancelled. And no one is supposed to travel between islands, so boats arriving in Nuka Hiva and Hiva Oa weren't supposed to change islands. But to fly back they had to change islands to Tahiti, and storing the boats in the Marquesas isn't so practical.

So there were some conflicting and difficult to enforce directives trying to get the cruisers off their boats and out of the country once they'd arrived.

People there have to fill out some forms and have passes to be off their boats, e.g. you might get stopped by the gendarmes on the way to the Carrefours and you need papers proving your quarantine/restriction status allows you to go. In general, on land movement by visiting yachts is highly curtailed. In some harbors, you're not even allowed to swim off your boats.

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1 minute ago, B.J. Porter said:

The latest I've heard is that there are some exceptions being made to allow some boats to stay in FP with a quarantine on them for a couple of weeks.

I think they wanted to store the boats and send everyone home, but most of the flights out are now cancelled. And no one is supposed to travel between islands, so boats arriving in Nuka Hiva and Hiva Oa weren't supposed to change islands. But to fly back they had to change islands to Tahiti, and storing the boats in the Marquesas isn't so practical.

So there were some conflicting and difficult to enforce directives trying to get the cruisers off their boats and out of the country once they'd arrived.

People there have to fill out some forms and have passes to be off their boats, e.g. you might get stopped by the gendarmes on the way to the Carrefours and you need papers proving your quarantine/restriction status allows you to go. In general, on land movement by visiting yachts is highly curtailed. In some harbors, you're not even allowed to swim off your boats.

Also the isolation period has been extended to April 15th, and there's a curfew from 8pm - 5am enforced by police with stiff fines.

8pm is barely dinner time in the French countries.

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Just saw this on the Luperon Facebook group. Horrific. He's an Aussie so not many options.

 

We arrived late last night into Puerto Rico, Puerto Real at the marina. We started our clearance with CBPROAM app and were approved for entry. We have a valid US cruising permit. We along with other international's were then instructed to go ashore and wait for CBP officers to finish our entry permits. They eventually arrived after 4hours and we were told that we have to leave, that Trump had changed the rules overnight and closed all borders. Puerto Rico was no longer accepting private cruising boats, no exceptions. We were told that we could fuel up but had to leave. We pleaded that we can't leave without a weather window to make it safe. We were then told that there would be a $6000 fine and or a 6 month prison term for not obeying. Everything is closed now. If you're not a US citizen, you will not be granted entry into PR.

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1 hour ago, tane said:

anybody knows what's happening to foreign boats arriving in Australia?

Everyone arriving on cruise ships or aircraft is getting a mandatory 2 week stay in quarantine. I doubt there's any exceptions for people arriving on their own boats. Maybe get to quarantine on your own boat - dunno. Have to ask the Border Farce for a definitive ruling.

I can still give a free mooring to one, maybe 2 more cruisers and limited shoreside support if people get stuck. Tasmania though so well off the normal cruising route.

FKT

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  • 2 weeks later...

Reports from a crew I know of who were halfway across the Atlantic when things went south, and just arrived in SVG a few days ago.  They are being forced to quarantine at a hotel at standard rates (all in separate rooms) for 14 days.  Passage time does not count, and they cannot wait our their quarantine aboard the boat. 

I guess that's one way to make up for lost hotel and tourism tax revenue...

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These Argentinian guys did not do well in Columbia.

https://elpais.com/internacional/2020-04-01/historia-de-un-naufragio-en-medio-de-la-pandemia.html

They were turned away from one port, despite engine problems, and told to go to Baranquilla.  They went aground and beached en route to Baranquilla, but got to immigration and medic personnel, who took testing samples and quarantined them in an apartment.  They were chased out of the apartment by fearful neighbors and returned to their boat to find that it had been burned.  Their tests came back negative.  

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SVG had some issues with cruisers not obeying on-board quarantines and/or trying to sneak in and out without clearing customs - the coat guard has thrown at least 4 boats out of the country.  I believe the mandatory quarantine in hotels upon arrival is their attempt to manage this as they have more resources to enforce the quarantine on shore than they do afloat.  Still, they seem to be the only place other than the USVI which will even allow entry in the eastern Caribbean at the moment, so beggars can't be choosers.

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On 4/9/2020 at 4:09 AM, jewingiv said:

Reports from a crew I know of who were halfway across the Atlantic when things went south, and just arrived in SVG a few days ago.  They are being forced to quarantine at a hotel at standard rates (all in separate rooms) for 14 days.  Passage time does not count, and they cannot wait our their quarantine aboard the boat. 

I guess that's one way to make up for lost hotel and tourism tax revenue...

SVG is a day sail from some other countries though. Passage time is negligible unless you're making landfall there from Europe.

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1 hour ago, B.J. Porter said:

SVG is a day sail from some other countries though. Passage time is negligible unless you're making landfall there from Europe.

 For certain.  That said, these folks kept logs of course, and they had easily verified 3rd-party real time data on the duration and nature of their passage via Yellowbrick.

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On 3/28/2020 at 12:16 PM, longhorn said:

Our original plan was to spend hurricane season in Grenada but we've decided to return to mainland US in the next month or two. Things are going to get a lot worse in the islands imo.

"Next month or two" quickly shifted to "we should go this week" to "we're leaving tomorrow morning.. get the boat ready!". We left Samana last Monday and got to Marathon Sunday morning. Route was along north coast of DR and Haiti then up the Old Bahamas Channel and the west side of Cay Sal.

It was a lot of motoring and motor sailing. If not for the backdrop of the pandemic it was actually a pretty nice passage.

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Were you "evicted" from Samana, or just decided it was time to go?  Saw a post on facebook a few days ago about a non-US boat which said they were kicked out of Samana and went to Puerto Rico only to run into Puerto Rico shutting them out while they were underway, and having to continue on to USVI.

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14 hours ago, hdra said:

Were you "evicted" from Samana, or just decided it was time to go?  Saw a post on facebook a few days ago about a non-US boat which said they were kicked out of Samana and went to Puerto Rico only to run into Puerto Rico shutting them out while they were underway, and having to continue on to USVI.

No. We had been in Marina Puerto Bahia for 2 weeks before the shutdown started. The staff and officials there were absolutely fantastic.

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Mexico's biosecurity.

https://www.noonsite.com/place/mexico/formalities/#biosecurity-section

And Medidas de Seguridad sanitaria. (Spanish)

https://coronavirus.gob.mx/medidas-de-seguridad-sanitaria/

A friend took to self-isolation with his girlfriend at a pretty anchorage North of San Carlos while her family was visiting. Policia Estatal has set up a roadblock on the only road into town. He said they were getting "strict", but if you've a boat or house there, they'd let you through.

IMG-20200409-WA0000.thumb.jpg.ea51a79441327980f83fae4c1568451d.jpg

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On 3/23/2020 at 8:55 AM, Ajax said:

The "Sailing Kittiwake" kids (Youtube) set off from the Canaries a little less than 2 weeks ago, expecting to land in Guadeloupe. They shut down so their next target was Grenada. That shut down, so their next target is the Grenadines. They are pretty close to land, and running low on food.

They are currently anchored right next to us in Bequia (SVG) and doing quite well.  I was assisting their shore based contacts after Grenada shut down.  They had a bit of a bumpy ride getting through C&I, but in the end it all worked out.  Should have an article in the May issue of Caribbean Compass.

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On 4/8/2020 at 1:07 PM, hdra said:

SVG had some issues with cruisers not obeying on-board quarantines and/or trying to sneak in and out without clearing customs - the coat guard has thrown at least 4 boats out of the country.  I believe the mandatory quarantine in hotels upon arrival is their attempt to manage this as they have more resources to enforce the quarantine on shore than they do afloat.  Still, they seem to be the only place other than the USVI which will even allow entry in the eastern Caribbean at the moment, so beggars can't be choosers.

Yep, watched two cruisers being escorted out of the harbor in Bequia by the SVG Coast Guard.  They had both arrived (one from St. Lucia and the other from Grenada) and went to C&I to clear in.  Based on where they arrived from, Immigration required them to quarantine on shore and not self-quarantine on their boats.  They refused to do this and demanded to be quarantined on their vessels.  They lost the argument and were denied entry and escorted out SVG territorial waters.  Not sure where they ended up......  Here is the press release from the PM of SVG: 

OFFICE 0F THE PRIME MINISTER
ST. VINCENT AND THE GRENADINES
WEST INDIES
Telephone: (784) 456-1703 Administrative Centre
Facsimile: (784) 457-2152 Bay Street
E-mail: pmosvg@vincysurf.com Kingstown

PRESS RELEASE

CLOSURE OF UNION ISLAND, CANOUAN, AND BEQUIA AS PORTS OF ENTRY FOR YACHTS AND VESSELS

On the advice of the Commander of the Coast Guard Service of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, the government has closed, until further notice, the ports of entry at Union Island, Canouan, and Bequia for yachts and other vessels, with immediate effect from 7:00 p.m. on March 27, 2020. An order in this regard has been issued to the relevant authorities.

This decision has been taken to focus the State’s resources on better border security. Four immediate incidents on Friday March 27th, prompted this decision on temporary closure:

(i) The illegal entry into Cumberland by a yacht, the captain of which was advised by the Coast Guard to leave immediately.

(ii) Aggressive conduct towards the State authorities by the captain and crew of an American-registered vessel which failed to clear Customs and Immigration in a timely manner. This vessel was eventually escorted south of the waters of St. Vincent and the Grenadines by the Coast Guard Service of St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

(iii) and (iv) The refusal by the crew and passengers on two vessels berthed in Bequia (one an American-flagged vessel; the other, Canadian-flagged) to be quarantined consequent upon their interaction with Customs, Immigration, Port Security and Health authorities. They were thus denied entry. The vessels were then escorted by the Coast Guard Service out of the waters of St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

As a consequence of the closure of these three ports of entry, following upon an earlier closure of the Chateaubelair port of entry, all yachts are required to enter at one of three ports on St. Vincent, namely Kingstown, Blue Lagoon, and Wallilabou.

/2…
The government of St. Vincent and the Grenadines urges all owners, operators, crew, and passengers of yachts to cooperate with the State authorities. If there is any attempt to circumvent the integrity and laws of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, especially at the time of Covid-19, the government will take further action promptly.

The government of St. Vincent and the Grenadines is determined to protect the people of St. Vincent and the Grenadines in every material particular. The government and people of St. Vincent and the Grenadines expect reasonableness and cooperation from those engaged in yachting; if they do not, the government will respond appropriately and firmly.

Dated the 27th day of March, 2020.

Office of the Prime Minister

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The refusal to allow quarantine on the boats confuses me. It keeps people further away from the population, it's easy to enforce and costs nothing.

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3 minutes ago, Ajax said:

The refusal to allow quarantine on the boats confuses me. It keeps people further away from the population, it's easy to enforce and costs nothing.

yeah but then you have to either trust yachties or divert two police to watch the boat 24/7.  Both options are expensive and/or unreliable.

 

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1 minute ago, MR.CLEAN said:

yeah but then you have to either trust yachties or divert two police to watch the boat 24/7.  Both options are expensive and/or unreliable.

 

Don't you have to devote law enforcement to monitoring the hotels to ensure they don't slip out and move around town?

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1 minute ago, Ajax said:

The refusal to allow quarantine on the boats confuses me. It keeps people further away from the population, it's easy to enforce and costs nothing.

A lot of truth to what you are saying, but here is their rational.  Their Coast Guard only has around 3 boats to monitor 32 islands, 9 of them being inhabited.  They do not have the resources to monitor vessel quarantine, thus the reason for the shore quarantine.  The cruisers are responsible for arranging and paying for their shoreside quarantine.  Their island, their rules....

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7 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Don't you have to devote law enforcement to monitoring the hotels to ensure they don't slip out and move around town?

I'm sure the staff and locals will make the land based police/authorities aware in seconds if they decide to go for a walk.

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26 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Don't you have to devote law enforcement to monitoring the hotels to ensure they don't slip out and move around town?

 

2 guards to watch 2 people

or

2 guards to watch 80 people (while those people pay for lodging and guard salary)

 

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24 minutes ago, Huggy Bear Brown said:

A lot of truth to what you are saying, but here is their rational.  Their Coast Guard only has around 3 boats to monitor 32 islands, 9 of them being inhabited.  They do not have the resources to monitor vessel quarantine, thus the reason for the shore quarantine.  The cruisers are responsible for arranging and paying for their shoreside quarantine.  Their island, their rules....

Ah...3 boats for many islands. Now I understand. Too much geography to enforce.

Sure, their island their rules. I would never advocate being a bad guest in a foreign land, I just didn't understand the rationale behind the rules.

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4 minutes ago, MR.CLEAN said:

 

2 guards to watch 2 people

or

2 guards to watch 80 people (while those people pay for lodging and guard salary)

 

Which is another reason why SVG shut down 4 ports of entry.  The only reasonable one for a cruiser is Blue Lagoon on St. Vincent which has C&I onsite with adjacent rooms for rent.

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13 hours ago, Ajax said:

Don't you have to devote law enforcement to monitoring the hotels to ensure they don't slip out and move around town?

Nope. Just some paper tape barrier on the door that tears if you open from inside. inspect once a day or have the hotel staff bringing food once a day report it. 

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Bocas has been pretty frustrating for the fam, the new cases in Panama are mostly young party gringos.  Not in Bocas yet but throughout the quarentine scofflaws were all the expats, people still partying and having a good time.  Some of our Brazilian friends are still sneaking their friends into the marina having BBqs etc like normal.  

It's hit the Kuna Yala, most certainly from tourists.  A lot of the really cool spots with indigenous populations are going to be looking at cruisers like the small pox carrying explorers a few centuries ago.

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3 hours ago, SASSAFRASS said:

 

It's hit the Kuna Yala, most certainly from tourists.  A lot of the really cool spots with indigenous populations are going to be looking at cruisers like the small pox carrying explorers a few centuries ago.

The only difference being that a few centuries ago the indigenous population didn't understand the problem.

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19 hours ago, Huggy Bear Brown said:

Yep, watched two cruisers being escorted out of the harbor in Bequia by the SVG Coast Guard.  They had both arrived (one from St. Lucia and the other from Grenada) and went to C&I to clear in.  Based on where they arrived from, Immigration required them to quarantine on shore and not self-quarantine on their boats.  They refused to do this and demanded to be quarantined on their vessels.  They lost the argument and were denied entry and escorted out SVG territorial waters.  Not sure where they ended up......  Here is the press release from the PM of SVG: 

OFFICE 0F THE PRIME MINISTER
ST. VINCENT AND THE GRENADINES
WEST INDIES
Telephone: (784) 456-1703 Administrative Centre
Facsimile: (784) 457-2152 Bay Street
E-mail: pmosvg@vincysurf.com Kingstown

PRESS RELEASE

CLOSURE OF UNION ISLAND, CANOUAN, AND BEQUIA AS PORTS OF ENTRY FOR YACHTS AND VESSELS

On the advice of the Commander of the Coast Guard Service of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, the government has closed, until further notice, the ports of entry at Union Island, Canouan, and Bequia for yachts and other vessels, with immediate effect from 7:00 p.m. on March 27, 2020. An order in this regard has been issued to the relevant authorities.

This decision has been taken to focus the State’s resources on better border security. Four immediate incidents on Friday March 27th, prompted this decision on temporary closure:

(i) The illegal entry into Cumberland by a yacht, the captain of which was advised by the Coast Guard to leave immediately.

(ii) Aggressive conduct towards the State authorities by the captain and crew of an American-registered vessel which failed to clear Customs and Immigration in a timely manner. This vessel was eventually escorted south of the waters of St. Vincent and the Grenadines by the Coast Guard Service of St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

(iii) and (iv) The refusal by the crew and passengers on two vessels berthed in Bequia (one an American-flagged vessel; the other, Canadian-flagged) to be quarantined consequent upon their interaction with Customs, Immigration, Port Security and Health authorities. They were thus denied entry. The vessels were then escorted by the Coast Guard Service out of the waters of St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

As a consequence of the closure of these three ports of entry, following upon an earlier closure of the Chateaubelair port of entry, all yachts are required to enter at one of three ports on St. Vincent, namely Kingstown, Blue Lagoon, and Wallilabou.

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The government of St. Vincent and the Grenadines urges all owners, operators, crew, and passengers of yachts to cooperate with the State authorities. If there is any attempt to circumvent the integrity and laws of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, especially at the time of Covid-19, the government will take further action promptly.

The government of St. Vincent and the Grenadines is determined to protect the people of St. Vincent and the Grenadines in every material particular. The government and people of St. Vincent and the Grenadines expect reasonableness and cooperation from those engaged in yachting; if they do not, the government will respond appropriately and firmly.

Dated the 27th day of March, 2020.

Office of the Prime Minister

Entitled Yachties: Minus 4.  Islanders: Plus 1.  Good on em!

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1 hour ago, European Bloke said:

The only difference being that a few centuries ago the indigenous population didn't understand the problem.

Interestingly, the first contact between Tasmanian aboriginals and westerners was with D’Entrecasteau soon after Cook sailed past here.

The French stayed some time in Recherche Bay and had a lot of contact with the aboriginal inhabitants, the French at the time were enamoured with the concept of the noble savage, and preferred to study primitive people rather than shoot them.

Unfortunately, around half the natives died from infectious illness once the French left. the expedition returned a couple of years later to re provision, and was met with hostility by the locals who had obviously figured out what happened.

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2 hours ago, olaf hart said:

Interestingly, the first contact between Tasmanian aboriginals and westerners was with D’Entrecasteau soon after Cook sailed past here.

The French stayed some time in Recherche Bay and had a lot of contact with the aboriginal inhabitants, the French at the time were enamoured with the concept of the noble savage, and preferred to study primitive people rather than shoot them.

Unfortunately, around half the natives died from infectious illness once the French left. the expedition returned a couple of years later to re provision, and was met with hostility by the locals who had obviously figured out what happened.

That's sad. An otherwise peaceful relationship ruined by a transmittable disease.

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The area I live in is full of interesting maritime history.

Much of it was charted and named by the French, even though Cook previously  anchored in Adventure Bay on the outside of the D’Entrecasteau Channel and the English regularly stayed in Adventure Bay,  they did not discover the Channel which was on the other side of Bruny Island.

Anchorages round here had major strategic importance, they were the first safe anchorages in the roaring forties after boats left South Africa, Bass Strait to our north was not discovered at the time of Cook, and for years after was too dangerous to pilot, so all ships coming to Oz aimed to run south of Tasmania and stop in Hobart.

Interestingly, Hobart was a bigger settlement than Sydney until round 1830.

 

 

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Fascinating history indeed.  Really liked the historical book on the Bounty and Bligh, history really gave him the short end of the stick.  The historical fiction "English Passengers" is one of my favorites as well, one of the best book endings I can think of in a long time...

Some day we will get there on our own hull

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7 hours ago, Wess said:

Entitled Yachties: Minus 4.  Islanders: Plus 1.  Good on em!

I can't speak to all of those issues, but NFW would I even THINK about agreeing to be quarantined off my boat. The chances of me getting something on shore - or spreading it - would be 10,000 times higher than on my boat besides for the low odds of anything portable being left on the boat after you get out :rolleyes:

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Then don't go there.  Part of cruising is accepting other cultures and that you ain't in charge.  Their island/country, their rules.  Too many people think the rights they have in their home country somehow apply everywhere.  And heck many of the rights you used to have at home you don't have anymore.  Try sailing a few laps around Annapolis harbor.

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The problem that a lot of people (especially non US citizens, as I think the USVI may still be open) are facing right now is that SVG is the only country in the Eastern Caribbean that is allowing any entry, even with the on-shore quarantine, and with hurricane season around the corner a lot of people who normally spend it in Grenada or Trinidad want to get south.  Insurance agents are getting a lot of calls right now to ask for coverage "in the box"

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It would seem to me vastly more sensible to have ONE quarantine anchorage for all the boats than to scatter potentially infected or infectable people ashore. YMMV, my experience out in the islands is that you go here and your valuable property goes there does not always end well :rolleyes:

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15 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

I have spent enough time "out there" to know how these "we'll look after your boat" deals go. I would most surely be saying thanks but no thanks, we'll be headed right back out.

Yep, that's absolutely your choice. I understand your feelings WRT your boat, but if it isn't your country, you don't get to make the rules. And right now, nobody has any time for rich entitled cruisers. And if you own a boat plus have the leisure time to sail it - you're rich by most standards so let's not argue that point.

Given Sassafrass' accounts of cruisers violating quarantine in Panama, I wouldn't trust visiting boats to obey the rules unsupervised either.

I have a cruising boat on one of my moorings ATM and they're likely to be there all winter so I'm certainly sympathetic to cruisers in general.

FKT

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3 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Yep, that's absolutely your choice. I understand your feelings WRT your boat, but if it isn't your country, you don't get to make the rules. And right now, nobody has any time for rich entitled cruisers. And if you own a boat plus have the leisure time to sail it - you're rich by most standards so let's not argue that point.

Given Sassafrass' accounts of cruisers violating quarantine in Panama, I wouldn't trust visiting boats to obey the rules unsupervised either.

I have a cruising boat on one of my moorings ATM and they're likely to be there all winter so I'm certainly sympathetic to cruisers in general.

FKT

Like everything else in life, it just takes a few assholes to ruin it for everyone else :rolleyes:

Still my idea of one supervises anchorage for all makes more sense than sending potentially infected people ashore. Unless they are literally in a prison, the same idiots who sneak off their boats will sneak out of there too :rolleyes:

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In any of the instances of having to leave the boat looting would be a big worry.  Even in normal times it doesn't take very long for a boat unattended at anchor to become general knowledge.  If I was in a group of boats in a similar situation I would try to pool resources and hire night watches for anchored boats.

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On 4/14/2020 at 1:25 PM, hdra said:

The problem that a lot of people (especially non US citizens, as I think the USVI may still be open) are facing right now is that SVG is the only country in the Eastern Caribbean that is allowing any entry, even with the on-shore quarantine, and with hurricane season around the corner a lot of people who normally spend it in Grenada or Trinidad want to get south.  Insurance agents are getting a lot of calls right now to ask for coverage "in the box"

And even SVG is getting a bit dicey....  While they have limited ports of entry open, they have turned vessels away.  An Austrian Volvo 65 pulled into SVG (Bequia) right in front of us.  Looks like they were denied entry, but not sure of the reasons.  Looks like C&I has a lot of latitude to determine whether to accept or deny entry.

Austrian Volvo 65.png

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10 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Like everything else in life, it just takes a few assholes to ruin it for everyone else :rolleyes:

Still my idea of one supervises anchorage for all makes more sense than sending potentially infected people ashore. Unless they are literally in a prison, the same idiots who sneak off their boats will sneak out of there too :rolleyes:

The West Australian Government just jailed one of those types for sneaking out of his hotel. Some people simply don't get the message.

And yes, it only takes a couple of people who think they're above the rules to make things difficult for everyone else.

Not far from where I live there's a Quarantine Bay and an old quarantine station on shore. This is nothing new, we've just had a long respite from the problem is all. And of course the speed of air travel makes things worse WRT rapid spread.

FKT

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46 minutes ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

The West Australian Government just jailed one of those types for sneaking out of his hotel. Some people simply don't get the message.

And yes, it only takes a couple of people who think they're above the rules to make things difficult for everyone else.

Not far from where I live there's a Quarantine Bay and an old quarantine station on shore. This is nothing new, we've just had a long respite from the problem is all. And of course the speed of air travel makes things worse WRT rapid spread.

FKT

Any records of when it was last used?  Just as a minor history lesson and distraction. 

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1 minute ago, mad said:

Any records of when it was last used?  Just as a minor history lesson and distraction. 

http://www.bica.org.au/brunyquarantinestation/

It's about 6 nm from Olaf's place and mine - we live in different bays on the western side of the Channel though sometimes I go hang out over on Bruny for a while.

FKT

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I heard some major airlines are preparing to fly some basic international routes between the US and Europe on May 20 and June 1.  This was information I received second hand from ground workers at LAX and SFO.  This info, if true, is obviously tentative and subject to change but if I had to guess I would say that the airlines are probably involved in some high level conversations with multiple governments so they probably have some of the best information.  And if airlines start flying in May and June then sailing the Mediterranean in July and/or August may be very possible.  Fingers crossed.

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The question is less if airlines are flying, because... they are flying. Albeit much less.

The question is more what are they flying and whom? Not tourists, but cargo and essential travellers, and the hurdles are high:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/uk-news/2020/apr/16/us-woman-refused-entry-uk-visit-pregnant-daughter

 

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Panama just tacked on another month today.... Little more to wait

  Looks like the kid has convinced the wife to adopt a stray cat who has decided to invade our boat.  It sleeps under the dingy at night and raids the cat food whenever it can get inside.  I was throwing it in the water every night when. I was home but it just climbs out and lays down by your feet, thanks for the bath type stuff.  At the rate this is going I'm going to come home to a cat farm on the boat.  We were worried about it upsetting the old guy, they had some fur removing fights at first, but now they seem to just tolorate each other.  The stray cat shit in his litter box though and that was a big no-no.  The kid is claiming she will have a separate litter box in her room and take care of it all by herself......

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Nemo already has been playing sprinkler in her room, which you would think would be a deterrent for the new cat.  I guess they are getting along or ignoring each other enough now it's not a issue.

 

Some shelter in place activities to keep you fit on your boat...

Little bit of silks,  it hurts just looking.

 

image.jpg

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Cool. Our kid had a trapeze rigged over the side with a spinnaker pole to send it from.

And she also liked tying a loop in the spinnaker halyard and leaping off the bow and landing somewhere along the aide of the boat. Works better for boats with little sheer.

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The bowsprit halyard works great.  Don't think I can fit a trampoline though.  They had one of those floating trampoline slide etc things in Tobago but when we got closer it looked like a recipe for lots of medical attention, mostly rust and rotten lines.

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On 4/21/2020 at 9:34 AM, toddster said:

Ugh... two male cats.  Just no.  Just wait 'till one of them pisses on you to demonstrate possession.  And everything else, too.  

Cat farming... His temporary name is "shit head" I guess

image.jpg

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I checked out of Mexico mid-march, heard that French Polynesia closed it's borders and checked right back into Mexico the next day.

Made the run up to Muertos, via Mazatlan and sat there for a week, watched a navy gunboat escort a sailboat back into the bay. Seemed to have just been for the long weekend however. 

The original plan was to go up into the sea, but with more and more restrictions coming (and I managed to get a 4 month contract up in Canada) decided to leave the boat in a shipyard in La Paz. Caught a ride to Cabo airport and had a 30 hour journey to get back to Canada. Whew.

Think I did the right thing but it's hard not to second guess yourself - I'd been preparing to go to FP for years, and next year it's gonna be a lot more hassle as my UK passport doesn't mean shit after the end of the year

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I read that France is "gradually" lifting the lock-down starting May 11 and other European countries are loosening the lock-down piece by piece.

Does anyone have real knowledge of the state of the charter companies in in the mediterranean?  Are they free to charter as soon as travel is allowed or are they classified as nonessential business that will be prohibited even longer?  (just curious if my summer vacation plans are totally doomed or not)

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