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Breezy in the yard so I put the main sheet on, powered up rig to fiddle with controls.  Looked down at the main block and noticed it pulling up the floorboard - it’s attached to wood backing piece under floor with two bolts.   ????

Noticed there are screw holes around front edge of floor but no bolts.   Bolting down should eliminate the pull-up around main block.   This is indeed an old boat.  

Comments?

4C797AE8-57B7-4565-B8C2-B66B4FA0AF55.jpeg

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8 hours ago, blunderfull said:

Breezy in the yard so I put the main sheet on, powered up rig to fiddle with controls.  Looked down at the main block and noticed it pulling up the floorboard - it’s attached to wood backing piece under floor with two bolts.   ????

Noticed there are screw holes around front edge of floor but no bolts.   Bolting down should eliminate the pull-up around main block.   This is indeed an old boat.  

Comments?

4C797AE8-57B7-4565-B8C2-B66B4FA0AF55.jpegThe

The boat isn't a true "double bottom", the plywood sits over the bilge and there should be vertical stringers running fore and aft. If you can find the stringers you can use regular wood screws and secure the floor, should stiffen up the boat and keep the block from flexing 

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28 minutes ago, onepointfivethumbs said:

The boat isn't a true "double bottom", the plywood sits over the bilge and there should be vertical stringers running fore and aft. If you can find the stringers you can use regular wood screws and secure the floor, should stiffen up the boat and keep the block from flexing 

Yes.  I’m taking the floor up & sort things out from there.

Thx.

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11 minutes ago, blunderfull said:

Yes.  I’m taking the floor up & sort things out from there.

Thx.

http://www.finnusa.org/2017/08/01/rebuilding-a-vintage-vanguard-a-pictoral/

It's a Vanguard and it's newer but Marcus did a pretty good job updating his boat, good reference photos

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30 minutes ago, onepointfivethumbs said:

http://www.finnusa.org/2017/08/01/rebuilding-a-vintage-vanguard-a-pictoral/

It's a Vanguard and it's newer but Marcus did a pretty good job updating his boat, good reference photos

Yes, been looking at that.  Once the yard is open full time, I’ll get it rigged, go for a couple sails and see if I can race it as is for awhile.  Keen on racing - then the rest in time.

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No color band.   Post pic tomm.  

Spent time cleaning/lubing sail track, straightened bent sections and replaced old halyard with 1/8” dyneema.    Now I have the nice stretchy luff (there’s elastic in luff?) It’s a North dacron.
 

While searching found best illustration of old Finn deck layouts in Royce’s Sailing Guide circa 1979.   Always kept that little book handy but, where it is?   Will order - used copies for $5.00

 

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Needlespar tweek:  kerfs  in sailtrack to give mast more flex.   Original from HS.
 

3 in top section & 5 in bottom.  
 

Near tip a wide cut:

7B0BF271-10E0-472D-8EE6-BA753811A9BB.jpeg


Other 7 cuts width of hacksaw blade:

15CFADC5-8AAD-41B1-8075-E1EBDA5D7580.jpeg

4F9B6FDB-1591-4E28-8681-983367A7B400.jpeg


 

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To adjust mast gate:
 

“Mast rake:  

“On old boats, a figure of 6800 mm would get you in the right vicinity...”.   (tape measure up halyard  to centre of transom)
 

- Robert Deaves / Finn Fundamentals (1999)

 

 

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Metal Masts:  

(Assuming Deaves & Mohilla  referencing Needlespar ‘M’ in the following.)

‘Ballparking mast stiffness‘:

”...measure height of first join in mast.  Higher the join, stiffer the mast.  Good masts were between 3750 and 3780 mm measured from the heel to the join.”

- Finnatics  (1999)

 

 

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On 6/9/2020 at 9:10 PM, blunderfull said:

Needlespar?

 

E93108D4-3575-407D-A7D6-E322AE089A08.jpeg

255BDFE9-C825-416D-B0F7-C8DEF6F046E4.jpeg

The only part of the halyard that needs to be non stretch or minimal stretch is from the halyard shackle to the halyard lock ( shown in above picture ). the rest of the halyard should be as small as possible to minimize windage.  You want to make sure that head of the sail goes up all the way when the halyard stop is in the lock. you want to put a knot there ( if using line instead of wire ) but the trick is to make the knot big enough to stay in the lock but small enough to pass through the halyard sheave. 

 

Best of luck and have fun  

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22 minutes ago, surf nazi said:

The only part of the halyard that needs to be non stretch or minimal stretch is from the halyard shackle to the halyard lock ( shown in above picture ). the rest of the halyard should be as small as possible to minimize windage.  You want to make sure that head of the sail goes up all the way when the halyard stop is in the lock. you want to put a knot there ( if using line instead of wire ) but the trick is to make the knot big enough to stay in the lock but small enough to pass through the halyard sheave. 

 

Best of luck and have fun  

Yea, the knot placement is key.   I’m using the 1/8” dyneema temporarily - what I had on hand.   The old line was gnarled up.

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