Jump to content

Your current favorite blue water boat - 50' or less


Recommended Posts

So,  I'm introducing a fun topic to hold us over through the virus. 

What blue water boats do you favor for world cruising.   A small crew, 2 to 4 or 5 people tops. 
I grew up lusting after boats like Pacific Seacraft,  Valiant yachts, Hans Christians and that sort.   
But now we have X-yachts, Hallberg-Rassy, and more modern performance cruisers. 
So, while we wait out the plague, what's your fantasy 40-50 foot blue water yacht? 

Pictures encouraged! 

Link to post
Share on other sites

It changes from week to week...

Recently, though, I've been quite taken with some of the European aluminum sailboats for high latitude cruising.  Key features I like: the no-nonsense look of the unpainted aluminum hulls and decks, pilothouses or well thought out hard dodgers, and very protected cockpits.

Boats like the Boreal 44, or the Dijkstra designed series of Bestevaers from K&M yachts, fit the bill.  My current favorite, though, is Dick Zaal's FAN FAN.  She''s an older design, but she's fast, big enough to be comfortable while still being easy to sail short handed, and ruggedly good looking.  She has completed the 2009 OSTAR (3rd place, fasted daily run of the fleet at 216 nautical miles), and been sailed around the world by Uwe Röttgering.

3-464-999-k3r.jpg.8a8c7030fd3ed51808b938093fc21c75.jpg

3-239-999-v1k.jpg.b9419b0c17b41067fb84a811572f6632.jpgUWE_6182.thumb.jpg.3dfaddc43a702a5d695a87038896f909.jpg

UWE_6266.thumb.jpg.54a0f6f079aa7047cc97b17c49e4355d.jpg

But I'm definitely someone who dreams more about Chilean or Icelandic fjords than tropical islands.

  • Like 8
  • Downvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Going full friggin' expeditionary- a Van De Stadt Samoa 47' or perhaps an Amel would be my choice.  I'd have to get super educated on the care and feeding of aluminum hulls.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It changes all the time, but I am totally off cats now since I have seem hurricanes pick big ones up and toss them. Lying at anchor in a hurricane is stressful enough without worrying about getting launched onto a building or something. All I had to worry about was dragging :rolleyes:

Here is my #1 criteria: At some point you may be in a storm so bad that you can do nothing but hope the boat stands up to it. Being in a boat that the designers thought would NEVER go offshore is not comforting at all and you need some confidence in your vessel. Even if two boats are identical, the one you THINK is marginal will have you calling yuppie 911 and being helo'ed off a boat that is undamaged and floating on her lines because you are scared.

I like Pacific Seacraft and Valiant for this reason. I have worked on a fair number of them and always thought they were well made. I do not like the BendyHunters I worked on for the same reason, they seemed to cheap out in too many places. I know someone took a Catalina 30 around Cape Horn, but IMHO the smaller ones were not really ever intended to do anything like that. I think the 47(48??) was made much tougher and maybe the 42s.

I dislike any boat with wide open cabin spaces, this is death in heavy weather. I think boat shows would do a service to customers if the boats were all winched over to 45 degrees heel angel at the dock. That big "looks like my living room" cabin suddenly is not so cool and you can see where you could actually sleep. That "island berth" is really a "fall on the floor berth" now.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

I dislike any boat with wide open cabin spaces, this is death in heavy weather. I think boat shows would do a service to customers if the boats were all winched over to 45 degrees heel angel at the dock. That big "looks like my living room" cabin suddenly is not so cool and you can see where you could actually sleep. That "island berth" is really a "fall on the floor berth" now. 

It doesn't take heavy weather, just going upwind in anything but flat water can render a wide open cabin plan difficult or dangerous.  I look at some of the interiors of Wally's, and while they are admittedly beautiful, I wonder how one's supposed to get to the head if you're going upwind in 25 knots true.

I also agree with you completely about the psychology of heavy weather.  Having a boat that you trust, makes a huge difference.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I suppose it depends on the use case.  My own long-term plan is to shove off in my early 50s if it all works out, sail the boat down to the Caribbean each winter, and use it as a floating second home, so not true ocean-crossing but definitely cruising.  For that, my eye's been on a Passport 470 since I actually got aboard one at the Newport show a few years back, in part because I'm a sucker for Bob Perry's designs, and in part because I like the center cockpit design for a cruising couple (you can get farther away from your s/o if you need to brood).

If we decide to be more ambitious and try to Pacific Puddle Jump one day I'd probably want something more true "blue water" - overbuilt and with a longer waterline - and so am also mildly obsessed with the Outbound 46.  Rugged outside, beautiful down below, and laid out for maximum ease of access - even the through hulls on those things are pretty.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It oscillates, depending on the week, between a 40-50’ high latitude expedition type alu boat for Antarctica, etc;  some sort of multihull to explore shallow waters in the Bahamas banks, etc. with; a Moore 24 to do the Singlehanded Transpac in one day, and this “generic” all around 30’ cruiser, well proven and fitted out: https://sailinganarchy.com/advert/1979-wylie-31-blue-water-cruiser/?_ga=2.177434021.1687343053.1585461308-240369384.1582682446

Link to post
Share on other sites

Swan 47. Bulletproof. Still turns heads wherever you go, and it's like living inside a fine piece of furniture.

 

Bones VIII in panama.jpeg

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, ChrisJD said:

I suppose it depends on the use case.  My own long-term plan is to shove off in my early 50s if it all works out, sail the boat down to the Caribbean each winter, and use it as a floating second home, so not true ocean-crossing but definitely cruising.  For that, my eye's been on a Passport 470 since I actually got aboard one at the Newport show a few years back, in part because I'm a sucker for Bob Perry's designs, and in part because I like the center cockpit design for a cruising couple (you can get farther away from your s/o if you need to brood).

If we decide to be more ambitious and try to Pacific Puddle Jump one day I'd probably want something more true "blue water" - overbuilt and with a longer waterline - and so am also mildly obsessed with the Outbound 46.  Rugged outside, beautiful down below, and laid out for maximum ease of access - even the through hulls on those things are pretty.

FYI - Circumnavigators starting from the East Coast of the USA will sometimes tell you USA to Bermuda was the roughest part of the entire trip. You can be in life-threateningly bad conditions a day out of many East Coast ports. Don't go thinking there are "ocean sailing" boats and "island boats", if you can't swim home - you are in the ocean! Not that a Passport can't be an ocean boat, I like them :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, ChrisJD said:

If we decide to be more ambitious and try to Pacific Puddle Jump one day I'd probably want something more true "blue water" - overbuilt and with a longer waterline - and so am also mildly obsessed with the Outbound 46.  Rugged outside, beautiful down below, and laid out for maximum ease of access - even the through hulls on those things are pretty.

The Outbounds are great boats. I've crewed on 2 US to Caribbean runs. They're not particularly eye-catching (to my eye), and they dont have any fancy or cutting edge features (a good thing), but it just gets the job done. Super functional and well built (huge structural grid with no liner, 1/2 safety glass windows, rack and pinion steering, list goes on ). The tankage is absurd for a 46 (really a 44) footer. I believe 210 gallons of diesel and water. Gives a ton of flexibility offshore.  So yeah, I've take one!

Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, ChrisJD said:

If we decide to be more ambitious and try to Pacific Puddle Jump one day I'd probably want something more true "blue water"

The PPJ does not ever test a boat's blue water capability. Like KIS said above, a day out of Boston might well be a better test.

20 minutes ago, Caca Cabeza said:

Swan 47. Bulletproof. Still turns heads wherever you go, and it's like living inside a fine piece of furniture.

Vs. my SC50. Still turns heads wherever you go, and it's like living inside a fun sailing boat.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Personality Test:

You are beating to windward and making slow progress. You think to yourself "This boat is kind of slow, but no way would I give up my generator, heat, AC, watermaker, freezer, big TV, and washing machine just to go faster".

You are beating to windward and making great progress. You think to yourself "This boat doesn't have a generator, heat, AC, watermaker, freezer, big TV, and washing machine, but no way would I give up going faster to get that stuff".

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, El Boracho said:

The PPJ does not ever test a boat's blue water capability. 

The trip back might.  Skip Allan’s account of his serious ordeal on Wildflower off N. California (en route back from Hawaii) is, I think, on many levels (boat prep/readiness, the human dimension, etc etc) excellent reading for anyone going offshore.  Serious respect.

Here: 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, El Boracho said:

Vs. my SC50. Still turns heads wherever you go, and it's like living inside a fun sailing boat.

Having crewed on one, delivery back from Hawaii (is this you, D? :-) ), I love them but can’t imagine dealing with one singlehanded.  (Size of the sails intimidates me...).  But if I had the budget for one, I’m sure I could figure it out :-) :-)

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, MFH125 said:

It doesn't take heavy weather, just going upwind in anything but flat water can render a wide open cabin plan difficult or dangerous.  I look at some of the interiors of Wally's, and while they are admittedly beautiful, I wonder how one's supposed to get to the head if you're going upwind in 25 knots true.

I also agree with you completely about the psychology of heavy weather.  Having a boat that you trust, makes a huge difference.

When I'm the proud (arrogant, filthy rich, obnoxious) owner of a large Wally yacht and I have an urgency upwind in 25 true, I have no intention of getting off my fat arse and slogging my way to the head. Either the head will come to me or I'll have staff to take care of that sort of thing.

Pshaw.

1 hour ago, Caca Cabeza said:

Swan 47. Bulletproof. Still turns heads wherever you go, and it's like living inside a fine piece of furniture.

 

Bones VIII in panama.jpeg

There's just something about a Nautor Swan...

Given that it will absolutely never happen for me and so I won't have to stand by my words, I am hereby categorically stating that the best blue water boat in the world, ever, past present or future, for me or anyone else, is a Nautor Swan 65. No arguments, don't even try.

(Disclaimer: In the event that I win a US Powerball or similar, and can actually get onto/into a Swan 65, I am quite prepared to say I was wrong.)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Having crewed on one, delivery back from Hawaii (is this you, D? :-) ), I love them but can’t imagine dealing with one singlehanded.  (Size of the sails intimidates me...).  But if I had the budget for one, I’m sure I could figure it out :-) :-)

Yeah, you'd figure it out. I can tell you that it is not hard to do. My smaller, more cruiser-correct boat was far more strain, discomfort, and maintenance.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Tanton Y_M said:

Often overlooked for offshore work; the Tanton 43. Plus working on this one now. at 48'.

H. and G. Bacher. Boat..jpg

200GAB-04-15-20.jpg

200SPL-04-15-20.jpg

Very nice.

I actually thought of buying a Freedom 40 as a longterm liveaboard plan. But it's still too far out that my kids leave the house. But then, maybe:

Vrooom. Like a truck.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Caca Cabeza said:

Swan 47. Bulletproof. Still turns heads wherever you go, and it's like living inside a fine piece of furniture.

 

Bones VIII in panama.jpeg

Seriously solid yacht!

I did a few years of foredeck union on a Swan 47 called Commotion, including a delivery from the Bahamas to Newport some 30ish years ago. I think we got it up to 11ish knots and wow did it push a metric shit ton of water out of the way. But it had a TV/DVD, washer/drier and a real freezers on it, so we were able to bring back fresh Atlantic fish for the owner!

We ate well on that trip, fishing was bountiful! Turns out the average speed of the 47 made it pretty good at trawling! Our best was a 3' Dorado

Coolest part of the trip was between Hatteras and New Jersey when we were overtaken by a giant pod(s) of 100s and 100s dolphins. Truly impressive display of massive biomass seemingly synchronized...

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Personality Test:

You are beating to windward and making slow progress. You think to yourself "This boat is kind of slow, but no way would I give up my generator, heat, AC, watermaker, freezer, big TV, and washing machine just to go faster".

You are beating to windward and making great progress. You think to yourself "This boat doesn't have a generator, heat, AC, watermaker, freezer, big TV, and washing machine, but no way would I give up going faster to get that stuff".

What is you have neither the generator, heat, AC, watermaker, freezer, big TV, and washing machine nor are making great progress? 

Is that just sad-banana? Poor life choices?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

My current favorite <50'er is the one i own.

Not perfect, not by any stretch, but I can afford it and it will take me anywhere I want to go (as long as there is 3 meters of water...)

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

My current favorite <50'er is the one i own.

Not perfect, not by any stretch, but I can afford it and it will take me anywhere I want to go (as long as there is 3 meters of water...)

I feel the same way about my boat, but with 5 feet of depth.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Matagi said:

I'm very excited about the Berckemeyer 42 DS, not sure how far it has come...

BM42DS_General.jpg

Cool.  I don't know how many people realize that you have to click on that image three times to see it full size, 2100 X 3700 pixels.

  1. once to magnify as an overlay on this page
  2. once more to open it in a separate tab
  3. and finally, once more again to see it FULL SIZE, as it should be: 2100 pixels wide by 3700 pixels high.

http://www.berckemeyer-yacht.de/images/yachts/BM42 DS/BM42DS_General.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

My current favorite <50'er is the one i own.

Not perfect, not by any stretch, but I can afford it and it will take me anywhere I want to go (as long as there is 3 meters of water...)

+1

My boat has the best invention EVER for world travel - she's paid for :D

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, justsomeguy! said:

I feel the same way about my boat, but with 5 feet of depth.

3 feet in my case.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, kent_island_sailor said:

+1

My boat has the best invention EVER for world travel - she's paid for :D

so is mine, thanks god!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, right now mine would float in 2’, but that’s cause the keel is next to the boat and not connected. And we’re kinda stuck till this is over...

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, plenamar said:

Garcia 45 

 

 

I really like the boat, inspired by  a legendary world cruiser's outlook on the ideal boat. I've gotta say though, the concept comes into its own with the subsequent Garcia 52, so even though it pips the sub 50 foot spirit of the thread, I'll post it. For me, a couple of the cool features are the hard-dodger cubby hole from which you can still operate the boat, and the centrally located chain-locker. And, BTW, the Bieker 55 SV Rocketscience posted above is a design and build that blows away the field. There is nothing comparable. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/21/2020 at 1:24 PM, ricwoz said:

So,  I'm introducing a fun topic to hold us over through the virus. 

What blue water boats do you favor for world cruising.   A small crew, 2 to 4 or 5 people tops. 
I grew up lusting after boats like Pacific Seacraft,  Valiant yachts, Hans Christians and that sort.   
But now we have X-yachts, Hallberg-Rassy, and more modern performance cruisers. 
So, while we wait out the plague, what's your fantasy 40-50 foot blue water yacht? 

Pictures encouraged! 

Unfair question. My boat is 53' long and it's my favorite.

85143218_10219532066985415_214689472208437248_n.jpg.8f08cedbde3639c12abd3348c25a5cd1.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Tanton Y_M said:

Often overlooked for offshore work; the Tanton 43. Plus working on this one now. at 48'.

H. and G. Bacher. Boat..jpg

200GAB-04-15-20.jpg

200SPL-04-15-20.jpg

If it had to be a monomarran, that would be the one for me. Wishbone booms, free standing mast are a shear joy on a cruising boat. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

As I posted previously, the flying cat thing has put me off them forever.

A lot of monohulls have been destroyed or sunk in hurricanes.   Wouldn't it be better to not be there when one is forecast?

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Here’s a guy who’s cat went for a flight while his trusty Bruce anchor held. The boat capsized in 170 mph winds but didn’t drag, so there’s that.

http://www.maxingout.com/captainslogarchive38.htm

At a certain point the eye of a storm might not discriminate between mono and multi.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, rustylaru said:

If it had to be a monomarran, that would be the one for me. Wishbone booms, free standing mast are a shear joy on a cruising boat. 

I like the sails in the sketch better than the pin head sails in the photo.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe Stan Honey was once asked "what is the best boat for cruising?"

His answer was "the boat you own"

Starting from scratch, need to know one's goals.  Short/single handing capability?, how many aboard?, etc etc.

For us, it was a Valiant 40.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Someone mentioned a Swan 65. Definitely an amazing boat!

Perhaps my favorite offshore boat of all time: a 50 foot CSK-ish catamaran built by the amazing Gil Iwamoto in Costa Mesa. Named Manuiwa and owned by John H. Weiser, of KUMU radio in Waikiki. John would have Gil come out to Hawaii to do maintenance on the plywood masterpiece.

Manuiwa earned her very high maintenance and operations budget as a very effective sales tool for KUMU radio advertising.

In the first (only?) Around the State Race, in mid July of 1974 or 1975 (73? 72?), the race fleet consisted of Manuiwa, a 60 foot trimaran, Windward Passage, Mistress Quickly, Bucanneer (a more powerful version of Ragtime, plywood, hard chine). From the start of Waikiki to Diamond Head bouy, it was Manuiwa stepping out in front with Passage, and that steel welded bowsprit, on our windward hip. As we passed Diamond Head, the advantage of narrow hulls slicing the big swells allowed us to quickly increase our lead. Then the mast collapsed. Flying a hull on a 22,000 lbs luxury cruising catamaran in big seas is a lot of compression on the spar!

Four guest staterooms. Two crew staterooms. Perhaps the best stereo system on the water in Hawaii at the time. Excellent motion in a seaway. Sweet, light helm. Room for a full Whaler on the aft tramp. 15 knots for passage planning. Stable, roomy, and FUN!

Over 20 knots taking the boat from Waikiki to Kaneohe to avoid Hurricane Iniki (I think, 1984?). Just an amazing boat.

EXPENSIVE TO RUN! Plywood is not a low maintenance approach to yacht operations. A foam fiberglass version would be amazing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

We're outside of the 50 foot range but we find the boat is easy to be on, fun to sail and is paid for.  Lots of beautiful boats here on St John but I don't think we would make a trade.  Well, maybe Zenji in front of us, that's a pretty damn nice yacht but then there would be a mortgage.

IMG_20200405_134618_compress12.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, carcrash said:

Cal 46 needs to be near the top of any list. 

image.jpeg

I'm not sure what kind of list that would be near the top of?

Maybe a list ranked by lowest sail area to displacement or most bulbous hull to length ratio? It might contend for a top placement of the list for the most motor sailer motor sailer.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/21/2020 at 10:44 AM, kent_island_sailor said:

Personality Test:

You are beating to windward and making slow progress. You think to yourself "This boat is kind of slow, but no way would I give up my generator, heat, AC, watermaker, freezer, big TV, and washing machine just to go faster".

You are beating to windward and making great progress. You think to yourself "This boat doesn't have a generator, heat, AC, watermaker, freezer, big TV, and washing machine, but no way would I give up going faster to get that stuff".

Option B please.

 

22 hours ago, Raz'r said:

My current favorite <50'er is the one i own.

Not perfect, not by any stretch, but I can afford it and it will take me anywhere I want to go (as long as there is 3 meters of water...)

Yup, the boat we own. We're glad we did our cruising over the last 5 years as the prospects for voyaging in the near future don't look good.

presto-SDR-2017.png

big_wave.png

Lituya-800.png

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Misbehavin' said:

I'm not sure what kind of list that would be near the top of?

Maybe a list ranked by lowest sail area to displacement or most bulbous hull to length ratio? It might contend for a top placement of the list for the most motor sailer motor sailer.

Blue water cruising boat list, of course!

It was Bill Lapworth's favorite boat. He owned one for years.

https://l-36.com/bill2.php

Also, Jack Jensen built one for himself, and he and his girlfriend sailed it around the world. Several of my friends joined them on that trip for various legs. By all accounts, it was truly an amazing adventure vessel. The people I know who went along with Jack included world famous racers.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, carcrash said:

Cal 46 needs to be near the top of any list. 

image.jpeg

Yup, lived aboard mine for 12 years. bought her in Hawaii and brought her back to the PNW.  Previous owner had done everything that needed to be done, paint, decks, tanks epoxied, a beautiful hard dodger, customer wind vane steering w/ two vanes etc., etc.  Sold that boat when my wife said she wouldn't spend another winter on it, that should have been a sign, took me a few more years to unload her.  Wish I had the Cal now.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

If we are dreaming I would take the custom Morris 47 Reindeer, or the Morris Apogee 51 or the Farr pilothouse 50.  On the multihull side I would take a TS5, outremer 51 or I have a soft spot for the older Switch 51.  
 

I guess I should start playing the lottery....

D3F320EF-DBA0-49A2-B774-6D5E4DF8AE2E.jpeg

1843A7BB-A45E-46E7-B18A-3F59BFD618B4.jpeg

DD41A1D6-F398-4388-A5F5-8A59B5156F6B.jpeg

A7DEE3AF-5445-409A-B48C-D4D2CC5DDB1C.jpeg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, carcrash said:

Blue water cruising boat list, of course!

It was Bill Lapworth's favorite boat. He owned one for years.

https://l-36.com/bill2.php

Also, Jack Jensen built one for himself, and he and his girlfriend sailed it around the world. Several of my friends joined them on that trip for various legs. By all accounts, it was truly an amazing adventure vessel. The people I know who went along with Jack included world famous racers.

Never heard of BIll on this side of the pond, is he a famous rock star or something?

But you wrote "lists" in plural, I'm still waiting for the other lists.

Maybe it's at the top of "Built like a brick house = looks like a brick house"-list, I think the design could work with some mullions on the windows, maybe a gutter too and a tile roof.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Misbehavin' said:

Never heard of BIll on this side of the pond, is he a famous rock star or something?

But you wrote "lists" in plural, I'm still waiting for the other lists.

Maybe it's at the top of "Built like a brick house = looks like a brick house"-list, I think the design could work with some mullions on the windows, maybe a gutter too and a tile roof.

I have a lot of respect for the Cal 2-46 - almost put an offer on one.  I think it does a great job addressing the way people actually use their boats, versus how they think they will.  They're built for chuffing along at 6-7kts burning 0.6gal/hr at 1600rpm, shutting down the engine when the wind is abeam or aft and over 15kts.  The saloon windows are fantastic, and the layout is great - it feels huge for a 46' boat with just 12'6" of beam.  tankage is in the hundreds for fuel and water.  Even has a separate shower stall, and an enviable standing height engine room.  

What else gives you that kind of range and comfort for $75k?  

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/21/2020 at 1:09 PM, kent_island_sailor said:

FYI - Circumnavigators starting from the East Coast of the USA will sometimes tell you USA to Bermuda was the roughest part of the entire trip. You can be in life-threateningly bad conditions a day out of many East Coast ports. Don't go thinking there are "ocean sailing" boats and "island boats", if you can't swim home - you are in the ocean! Not that a Passport can't be an ocean boat, I like them :)

It is interesting that for boats going to the Caribbean from the US and from Western Europe the toughest part can be the first part. Although a few years ago we left the Chesapeake at the same time as the Salty Dog and the winds were not remotely as promised, basically they were what we on Lake Ontario call 'light and variable'. We decided to stop in Bermuda for fuel. Funny to look at the AIS and see all sorts of other boats from the SD angling north to do the same thing. Crazy wind pattens continued later. Near Barbuda we had 10 knots from the SW. One of the locals said the only time they get SW winds is from a hurricane.

Years ago someone told me if you are going from the US to the Caribbean and the conditions are good don't stop in Bermuda even though it is such a lovely spot to stop. On my first trip south, in the days of Herb giving routing advice we did not stop. A couple of boats that started in Newport and got a bit of a beating from a gale did stop to lick their wounds. It was three weeks, near the end of November before they got decent conditions to carry on.

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, socalrider said:

I have a lot of respect for the Cal 2-46 - almost put an offer on one.  I think it does a great job addressing the way people actually use their boats, versus how they think they will.  They're built for chuffing along at 6-7kts burning 0.6gal/hr at 1600rpm, shutting down the engine when the wind is abeam or aft and over 15kts.  The saloon windows are fantastic, and the layout is great - it feels huge for a 46' boat with just 12'6" of beam.  tankage is in the hundreds for fuel and water.  Even has a separate shower stall, and an enviable standing height engine room.  

What else gives you that kind of range and comfort for $75k?  

It doesn’t fit the fantasy many have lodged in their heads?  It’s a cliche to say it’s all trade offs. Maybe not my first choice (my first choice is my current boat, paid for and mostly outfitted; second “dream” choice would, of course, be something different, paid for, faster, stronger, better, etc etc etc etc - but for $75K, for two people long term cruising, not a bad, very affordable choice.  (Provided you don’t have major refitting expenses.)

Link to post
Share on other sites

I wrote about the Swan 65 in the „Solo circumnavigation“ thread in ocean racing anarchy  just a couple of days ago. Really cool for a 50 year old design. But I hated that bridgedeck. Oh, and it really had a washing machine! Totally useless because it was a standard „home“ kind of machine that always sounded an alarm and then shut down because of the rolling of the boat.  White old people’s problems I guess...

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Misbehavin' said:

Never heard of BIll on this side of the pond, is he a famous rock star or something?

Never heard of the Cal 40?

Link to post
Share on other sites

A Gunboat 48 would be a nice place to start.

 

image.png.b407727bf58349bc4990180ca032172c.png

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites

Fav offshore boat for me has been J120.  Frigging great performer all around.  Adaptable sailplan, good in light, medium, and heavy stuff, a blast on broad reaches in a blow without feeling like something is going to explode any second, or wipeout every other wave. Hit 19 knots in that baby and felt in positive control.  Small enough sailplan to be easily handled. Good ergonomics on a heel. Just a great boat.

Other 2 fav offshore boats, Swan 70 and Frers 85 (yes over 50 ft), but a lot harder to handle.  Trying to get the chicken kite back onboard after a wipeout in 35-40kts and 15+ foot  waves was an ordeal and quite scary.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, olaf hart said:

Realistically though, the best offshore boat is the one you own outright, trust, and know backwards...

Yep - I know my boat now from the keelboats to the masthead. all the electronics, all the plumbing, etc, etc, etc .

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Pretty sure this is the same GB48 design.

image.png.e3fafc541309b66f1a478e744e1dfa5d.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

Stan Honey chose a Cal 40 for the Singlehanded Transpac, among many other racing adventures.

http://honeynav.com/category/cal40/

Quote

We bought Illusion in 1988 intending to go cruising, but old habits die hard so we mostly raced.  We’ve raced Illusion to Hawaii 5 times.  I set the singlehanded Transpac record in 1992.  Sally and I won the Pacific Cup overall fleet in 1996, sailing doublehanded.  We won class in the Transpac and 3rd overall in 2003 sailing with Cal40 legends Jon Andron and Skip Allan on our four person crew.  Sally raced Illusion with a four woman crew in the 2005 Transpac and got 2nd in class.  We’ve also won the Northern California inshore YRA series and the offshore OYRA series, and have competed in countless Farallon Races, singlehanded, doublehanded, and crewed, and won our share.

We’ve found that Illusion is a terrific boat to race shorthanded, mostly because the Cal 40 has such “nice manners”.  It steers terrifically under autopilot.  That results in part from the fact that the Cal 40 doesn’t have a wide stern, and so doesn’t try to turn whenever it heels or rolls.    Of course Cal40’s are legendary in their ability to carry sail downwind, as seen in the photos below.  In all of our Hawaii Races, shorthanded or crewed, we’ve never had to douse the kite for control, and the autopilot could steer at any time with the kite up.

In 2014 we finally decided to give cruising a try and sailed Illusion to Mexico.  We spent two years cruising Illusion in the Sea of Cortez and on the Gold Coast of mainland Mexico.  Another year was spent cruising Central America to Panama.  Yet another year in the Western Caribbean including stops in Boco del Toro, the San Blas Islands, Providencia, Grand Cayman, Cuba and finally Key West.  We’re on our way to New England to resume old habits and race in the 2020 Newport Bermuda Race.  Sally and I were not sure that we’d enjoy cruising but we’ve had a terrific time.  Part of the reason is that cruising is stress-free in a boat that we’ve raced so much doublehanded.  The cruising community that we’ve run across thinks that we’re nuts because we’re delighted to sail in lots of breeze, even upwind.

cal40-hull-lines-1.thumb.jpg.2ff67034850e227fa479dc5fed117ea3.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

In the USA at least that is a famous design, one could argue the mother of all the sleds.

https://www.yachtworld.com/research/cal-40/

 

cal40.jpg

Although Cal 20s are found many places (b/c trailerable), I’m guessing the 40s are mostly  known on the US west coast in particular.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/20/2020 at 9:24 PM, ricwoz said:

What blue water boats do you favor for world cruising.   A small crew, 2 to 4 or 5 people tops. 

My heart belongs to the Little Harbor boats.  The 44 would be pretty sweet. 
6586357_20190905090051862_1_XLARGE.jpg.4b0f8f890cf659d32a80e76a672865b4.jpg

And comfy inside
6586357_20180118102844940_1_XLARGE.jpg.0e6e3855b9cfdd046416f61fda22d34f.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites