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What's at your bird feeder?


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I thought there was a thread like this a while back, but searched and could not find?

Now that the Goldfinches are returning from warmer climates, we are going through a $30, 25 pound bag of sunflower hearts every 3 weeks, not that I'm complaining.  Two supposedly "squirrel-proof" feeders with a spring that closes the door that releases the feed into the trays, but they can still empty the 3 trays of what was in them before the spring came down, so we are feeding the fat squirrels quite a bit as well.  Those are for the Sunflower hearts.  Also have 2 for Nyjer thistle seed that was also a slow mover, until the Finches returned.  Also two feeders for generic mixed seed, mostly millet with sunflower seeds and some others that are not very popular so long time between filling them.  The sunflower heart feeders now can be filled twice a day.

We have a lot of windows facing north towards the CT River view, and the deck there has the 6 feeders, and also 2 suet cake units for the downy and yellowbellied woodpeckers and occasional nuthatch.  Lately, we have been losing a goldfinch every week or ten days from crashing into the glass.  So, I am looking for some real world advice on what to put on the glass that will warn the birds away, without spoiling the lovely waterview from the L-shaped living-dining room.  Thanks in advance!!

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Local wildlife this weekend. He did not like the rain. Super impressed with our Olympus (m4/3) cheap $150 telephoto. You can just see a drop of rain on his claw.

very rare sighting.  we might never see these in the wild...  

Earlier, I told of a bald eagle taking a sea-run cutthroat from an osprey on my beach. On a lake on this island there are 4 ospreys and 2 bald eagles.  The eagles would also take fish from the os

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I took mine down because the damn squirrels kept chasing the birds away, even with squirrel proof feeders.  I used to put generic seed for finches, cardinals, etc.  Thats what we mostly get around where I lived.

 

As for the window, I'm not sure I have answer for that....

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16 minutes ago, Jkdubz808 said:

As for the window, I'm not sure I have answer for that....

The squirrels here don't scare them away for long, of very far.  They will feed at a different feeder 10 feet away, while the squirrel gorges on sunflower hearts, but hey, squirrels gotta eat too.  If I were into hunting and eating squirrels these characters would be quite well fattened up!  We got a plaque from the National Wildlife Federation naming our house and property a "Certified Wildlife Habitat" because we meet all the criteria, providing food, water, habitat for nesting and rearing young.  But, anyone can lie about those things and also get for a hundred bucks! LOL :lol:

I'm sure I can google the glass thing, and find zillions of recommended fixes, but usually get real world, tested advice from everyone here.

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5 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

 

Thanks Snaggy, have you or someone you know personally used that, and does it work??

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1 hour ago, billy backstay said:

I thought there was a thread like this a while back, but searched and could not find?

Now that the Goldfinches are returning from warmer climates, we are going through a $30, 25 pound bag of sunflower hearts every 3 weeks, not that I'm complaining.  Two supposedly "squirrel-proof" feeders with a spring that closes the door that releases the feed into the trays, but they can still empty the 3 trays of what was in them before the spring came down, so we are feeding the fat squirrels quite a bit as well.  Those are for the Sunflower hearts.  Also have 2 for Nyjer thistle seed that was also a slow mover, until the Finches returned.  Also two feeders for generic mixed seed, mostly millet with sunflower seeds and some others that are not very popular so long time between filling them.  The sunflower heart feeders now can be filled twice a day.

We have a lot of windows facing north towards the CT River view, and the deck there has the 6 feeders, and also 2 suet cake units for the downy and yellowbellied woodpeckers and occasional nuthatch.  Lately, we have been losing a goldfinch every week or ten days from crashing into the glass.  So, I am looking for some real world advice on what to put on the glass that will warn the birds away, without spoiling the lovely waterview from the L-shaped living-dining room.  Thanks in advance!!

Get a cat.

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19 minutes ago, Dorado said:

Get a cat.

 

We have 2, and one likes to be out on the deck and bring the already dead finches to the door.  But when she is out there, she scares the birds away from the feeders for a while.

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24 minutes ago, justsomeguy! said:

Too many species to list, but lately I've been enjoying the great horned owls.

 

Last week in the late afternoon I heard two owls hooting back and forth, one in our mostly wooded 2 acres, and one about a quarter mile away.  I carefully walked towards the sound of the closer one, but could not spot it in the thick evergreen tree.  I expect they were mating calls.

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53 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

FIL sayes it cutte downe birde collideng with hise windowes.  Link is aboive.                                     :) 

 

Thanks, just ordered 2 online.

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Cat food.

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Listening to the Whip Poor Will... this evening such a soothing sound.

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fucking ospreys.. and my birdfeeder is the windchicken on the 35... they perch up there and dive into the river for fish.

 

 

it is fun to watch em build their nest and raise the young ones and teach em how to fly though...

 

 

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3 hours ago, billy backstay said:

 

Last week in the late afternoon I heard two owls hooting back and forth, one in our mostly wooded 2 acres, and one about a quarter mile away.  I carefully walked towards the sound of the closer one, but could not spot it in the thick evergreen tree.  I expect they were mating calls.

Usually owls mate late winter so when the early spring rodents are born the owlets can be fed. Then they have all summer to fledge and learn to hunt. 

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1 hour ago, peragrin said:

Bear.  We have had to put away our bird feeders as a black bear is wandering around town looking for snacks.bent a metal pole bird feeder in half.

 

Southern NH right on the mass/Vermont border

 

I think I still have the pic on my phone from about 5 years ago, when Mom was still among the living.  Her neighbor took a pic of a young black bear up on his hind legs pilfering her feeder in broad daylight just a few hundred yards from downtown Essex Village.  I sent the pic to the local news channel  and they ran it on their 6 o'clock news feed.

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14 hours ago, billy backstay said:
14 hours ago, Dorado said:

Get a cat.

 

We have 2, and one likes to be out on the deck and bring the already dead finches to the door.  But when she is out there, she scares the birds away from the feeders for a while.

They may not be dead before the cat gets them

We have a glass room overlooking the back yard, and even with stickers on the windows we have bird strikes occasionally... yes I think the stickers help but birds, like people, apparently fly sometimes without looking where they're going. Anyway, a couple times a year, we have a bird knock itself out on a window and lay feet-up on the porch. Usually after ten or fifteen minutes at most, they are standing up and blinking. Another ten or fifteen and they fly away.

- DSK

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1 minute ago, Steam Flyer said:

They may not be dead before the cat gets them

We have a glass room overlooking the back yard, and even with stickers on the windows we have bird strikes occasionally... yes I think the stickers help but birds, like people, apparently fly sometimes without looking where they're going. Anyway, a couple times a year, we have a bird knock itself out on a window and lay feet-up on the porch. Usually after ten or fifteen minutes at most, they are standing up and blinking. Another ten or fifteen and they fly away.

- DSK

 

I don't think they are not looking where they are going.  I've been told that the glass reflects the sky and outdoor surroundings, so to them it looks like clear sailing ahead...

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When we lived in California we had a hummingbird feeder outside the kitchen window.  Seeing those was always a big pleasure.  I don't know if we have them in south Florida.  I have been wanting to put another feeder up in the backyard on a stand alone pole that the squirrels can't climb up.  

 

We have a wooded area behind the house where two big barn owls live.  Full of hawks as well.

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1 hour ago, Jkdubz808 said:

When we lived in California we had a hummingbird feeder outside the kitchen window.  Seeing those was always a big pleasure.  I don't know if we have them in south Florida.  I have been wanting to put another feeder up in the backyard on a stand alone pole that the squirrels can't climb up.  

 

We have a wooded area behind the house where two big barn owls live.  Full of hawks as well.

 

You'd be surprised at the squirrels ability to climb up poles you would think unclimbable.  Used to slather the metal pipe pole with Crisco, to slow them down for a while.  We had hummingbird feeders but they always attracted lots of bees, and Missus BB is deathly allergic to bee stings, so we got rid of them.  Lots of hawks around here too, lots of woodlands.  Had a tiny hawk of a type I had never seen before get stunned hitting the glass, after trying to nail a small bird for lunch.  He sat on the deck stunned for a while, then flew off.  See Redtail hawks a lot as well as Ospreys and Bald Eagles.

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16 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

Had a tiny hawk of a type I had never seen before get stunned hitting the glass, after trying to nail a small bird for lunch.  He sat on the deck stunned for a while, then flew off.  

Kestrele?

70583921-480px.jpg

They our comeng backe strongue.                      :)

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1 minute ago, Snaggletooth said:

Kestrele?

70583921-480px.jpg

They our comeng backe strongue.                      :)

 

No I think I found it in my book, but don't recall now. It's plumage was fairly bland, greyish and brown....

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The hawks around us can be seen many times carrying away snakes.  Most likely black racers I would guess.

 

Lots of ospreys, and some bald eagles as well in the preserves.  We put a bat box up on my neighbors tree that sits between our houses, still empty.

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20 minutes ago, Jkdubz808 said:

The hawks around us can be seen many times carrying away snakes.  Most likely black racers I would guess.

 

Lots of ospreys, and some bald eagles as well in the preserves.  We put a bat box up on my neighbors tree that sits between our houses, still empty.

 

We lived on a Cove of the lower CT River for 30 years until 2015.  Watched many ospreys fishing and catching fish.  Also saw a Redtail Hawk nail a nearly full grown Grey Squirrel in a large oak tree overhanging the water.  It was too heavy to carry off so it dropped down to the shore below to finish it off.  Found a dead Coopers Hawk in the driveway one day years ago, and I wanted to have it mounted by s taxidermist,  but the state came and took it away, as it's illegal in CT to possess a live of dead bird of prey.

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So far this morning

Rufous hummingbird Anna's Hummingbird nuthatches, titmouses house finches, red-winged blackbirds, Bullock's Orioles, Eurasian doves, mourning doves, wild turkey hens, bluebirds, black Phoebe's, white crowned Sparrows.

There's a nesting pair of red tailed hawks in an oak tree about 150 yards from where I'm sitting and I can hear a gobbler in the distance but he doesn't show himself. Local Honkers flying over. 

 

20200424_081316.jpg

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On 4/23/2020 at 11:00 AM, billy backstay said:

 

but the state came and took it away, as it's illegal in CT to possess a live of dead bird of prey.

Without a permit, it’s illegal in the entire USA. Can’t even possess feathers. 

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Goldfinches, tufted titmice, chickadees, sparrows, mourning doves, cardinals, nut hatches, Carolina wrens, house finches, wood thrush, juncos, red wing blackbirds, robins snag a worm in the shell pile, chipmunks, grey squirrels, red squirrels, red tail hawks and peregrine falcons pick off those who fail to remain wary. Field mice only at night and barred owls keep their numbers under control. 
 

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1 hour ago, Orion Jim said:

Goldfinches, tufted titmice, chickadees, sparrows, mourning doves, cardinals, nut hatches, Carolina wrens, house finches, wood thrush, juncos, red wing blackbirds, robins snag a worm in the shell pile, chipmunks, grey squirrels, red squirrels, red tail hawks and peregrine falcons pick off those who fail to remain wary. Field mice only at night and barred owls keep their numbers under control. 
 

Where in New England are you?  I should expect to see much the same but do not.  We are in Deep River, CT, a quarter mile west of the CT River, with lots of woodlands around us, and many acres of protected wildlife land just across the river that we view to the North from our back deck....

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43 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

Where in New England are you?  I should expect to see much the same but do not.  We are in Deep River, CT, a quarter mile west of the CT River, with lots of woodlands around us, and many acres of protected wildlife land just across the river that we view to the North from our back deck....

Just north of you in East Hampton. I’ve had feeders out for years, twelve months a year. A steady source of nutrition does much to become a focal point. As the seasons, and seasonal migrations take place I see different species. 

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On 4/24/2020 at 9:31 PM, Orion Jim said:

Just north of you in East Hampton. I’ve had feeders out for years, twelve months a year. A steady source of nutrition does much to become a focal point. As the seasons, and seasonal migrations take place I see different species. 

 

Same here, year round. Dunno know if I mentioned this in this thread, or another, but you can get lovely plaque from the National Wildlife Federation certifying your property as a "wildlife habitat".  You just need to answer a bunch of questions and send them a hundred bucks.  It looks real nice next to our front door.  Only thing is they will then send you an email every day begging for money, LOL!!   The squirrels here must have found a better Diner nearby.  I was filling the sunflower heart feeders twice a day, but yesterday they were still half full when I got home from work around 3.

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This is nesting in  a box in my backyard here in Austin....I have a nest cam outside box to record activities between the male and female but got this sneak peak inside yesterday.

 

 

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On 4/23/2020 at 6:06 AM, billy backstay said:

 

I don't think they are not looking where they are going.  I've been told that the glass reflects the sky and outdoor surroundings, so to them it looks like clear sailing ahead...

a few years ago we put larger windows in the kitchen and living room and REMOVED THE WALL separating he two rooms...holy shit the dead bird count spiked, the little buggers think they are going to fly right through.

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46 minutes ago, Blue Crab said:

Jules and I have a side gig going. She's making high $ varnished plaques for $85 that say anything you want. I'm taking in the cash. Help a bro and sis out?

 

So, You are Jules lesser half?  Explains a lot!!  Why she has to escape to her woodworking shop!!  LOL!

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15 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

firste scarlette taningere of the yeare.                        :)

Yay ! Trophy bird. Haven't seen any western tanagers for quite a while. I did see a vermillion flycatcher in  Arizona in early March though. Very cool bird. 

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Yesterday. Not my photo. No feeder but I've a patch of dirt where a tree was just outside the window. Must be a shitload of worms because every neighborhood bird stops by. I've been hearing this guy. Great to catch a glimpse.   

 

Similar Species to Red-headed Woodpecker, All About Birds, Cornell ...

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2 hours ago, Blue Crab said:

Yesterday. Not my photo. No feeder but I've a patch of dirt where a tree was just outside the window. Must be a shitload of worms because every neighborhood bird stops by. I've been hearing this guy. Great to catch a glimpse.   

 

Similar Species to Red-headed Woodpecker, All About Birds, Cornell ...

Red Bellied Woodpecker. One of my favorites. Used to have one that drank from my hummingbird feeder. 

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16 minutes ago, chinabald said:

Red Bellied Woodpecker. One of my favorites. Used to have one that drank from my hummingbird feeder. 

 

We were getting a pair or maybe 2 different pairs for several weeks, but haven't seen them in a while now, maybe nesting, or moved farther north?  Scarlet tanagers and Baltimore Orioles are pretty rare here in the lower CT River Valley.  Seen no tanagers since we moved into our new place last February, and only one Oriole.  OTOH, I am at work 5 1/2 days a week, so the may be more prevalent than appears....  Bald eagles and Ospreys are fairly common, and some eagle are year round.  

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32 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

nesteng ounes our yeare rounde...........                   :)

 

Where are you in WLIS, Snags??  Nesting is usually only in spring???

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3 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

Where are you in WLIS, Snags??  Nesting is usually only in spring???

Western Suffolke, I haive founde seven nesteng paires on LI, and benig tolde theire our 10 - 12 paires.  (Notte includeng the 5 in NYC)                                    :)

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I have a Great Blue Heron that shares my mooring buoy with a Pelagic Cormorant most afternoons.  

I'm always amazed when I see GBH's hunting frogs and mice in the fields nearby, it would seem that the bay would be a more productive venue?

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On 4/24/2020 at 7:29 PM, Orion Jim said:

Goldfinches, tufted titmice, chickadees, sparrows, mourning doves, cardinals, nut hatches, Carolina wrens, house finches, wood thrush, juncos, red wing blackbirds, robins snag a worm in the shell pile, chipmunks, grey squirrels, red squirrels, red tail hawks and peregrine falcons pick off those who fail to remain wary. Field mice only at night and barred owls keep their numbers under control. 
 

All of the above except the falcon; the Juncos left for their migration north last week, saw the first Carolina wren yesterday and a House Wren Friday. Also:

Downy, Hairy, Red-bellied & Pileated Woodpeckers; House & Purple Finches; Eastern Towhee; Turkeys; Redpolls; Catbirds; Cowbirds; 

Not at the feeder but: Great Blue Heron; Mallards, Turkey Vultures; mother and two adolescent Cooper’s Hawks from last year; Great Horned Owl pair that surprisingly tolerate the Barred Owl pair on the other side of our property; a Screech Owl that we hear all the time but haven’t seen yet this year; Wood Ducks. Sandhill Cranes are still migrating and stop to rest in the field the other side of the woods. A Harrier was sitting on the fence last week trying to figure out how to deal with the 3-4’ writhing snake it was clutching, last time I saw a Harrier around the house was several years ago.

If I could do it all over I’d be an ornithologist. I’ve been interested in birds since I was a kid, no idea why I didn’t pursue it.

EDIT: No idea why the type is larger in the one section, don’t see how to edit it. 

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The only blue herons I ever see are in the Fall when they arrive and decimate the fish in my garden pond.

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Interesting how migration patterns & timing is changing with the last few winters being warmer overall (along the Mississippi Valley/Great Lakes flyway at least). We usually jot down the date when we first see a species every year, not definitive of course but we’re seeing Robins, Redwings, Cowbirds and Sandhill Cranes in particular 4 weeks or more earlier than we did 10-15 years ago. And we’ve had a few years where flocks of American White Pelicans migrated north along the eastern shore of Lake Michigan (stopping to rest in the marshes here in Holland) instead of their usual route along the west shore. This isn’t meant to start a climate change debate (Take it to PA!) but curious what other bird folks are seeing?

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They do seem like they are 20 feet tall when they leave a swath across my windshield.

I had a close encounter with a GBH several years ago.  It was attacked by a Bald Eagle on the beach in front of my house.  It survived, but was injured.  I called a recovery center, and they said to bring it in, but to be very careful. . . their aim is very good, and they go for the eyes.  I was able to wrap it in a towel and transport it successfully. 

 

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1 hour ago, jerseyguy said:

The only blue herons I ever see are in the Fall when they arrive and decimate the fish in my garden pond.

Put up a plastice oune, by ponde, that wille keepe orthers awaye.                                  :)

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7 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

Put up a plastice oune, by ponde, that wille keepe orthers awaye.                                  :)

I have 2 at the pond. The live ones think it is a party.

And then there are the wild minks who also seem to enjoy a fish dinner

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9 hours ago, Snaggletooth said:

I woude of thouht the sharpe shinned hawke woude be the sparrow hawke....

70780581-480px.jpg

Agreed, the Sharpe Shinned looks more like a sparrow.   The Kestrel, as Cyclone's Audubon link shows, likes to Dine on the "Lowly Sparrow".

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6 hours ago, jerseyguy said:

The only blue herons I ever see are in the Fall when they arrive and decimate the fish in my garden pond.

A full grown male named Henry was a regular at the shrimp tank ... KOA Fiesta Key. 

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We added a birdbath last year,  very entertaining,  especially when one bird is glowering at another for splashing too much 

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Pretty much just sparrows and white winged doves at the feeder on our bedroom window. The two hummingbird feeders are getting no action at all.

I did see something cool yesterday though. I was at the lake house extending the fence into the lake to keep out the GOD DAMNED HOGS, and I heard this whooshing sound. I looked up to see three turkey flying from a tree about 50 feet away across the lake to their roost. For an unsightly bird, they are beautiful in flight!

Found this image online

Up-Close Photos of Wild Turkeys Like You've Never Seen | Wild ...

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I found some old bird seed while cleaning out a pantry in the garage and thought.................So I got a feeder and not many birds have been by.

Maybe birds know when seed is old???

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