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What's at your bird feeder?


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3 minutes ago, goob said:

Had to pull my feeders, a Coopers Hawk was using it as a buffet, and the Mrs didn't like seeing it eating finches on the back fence.  Sorry no pics

 

Cats are banned from the back porch, as they were killing and eating finches.  Sunny, the better hunter of the two, still sits at the sliding glass door begging to go out, so she is allowed on the screened porch, but not the deck...  I'm surprised we have not seen smaller hawks, although last year a very small one, of a breed I had never seen before, got stunned hitting a window while trying to grab a meal.....

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Local wildlife this weekend. He did not like the rain. Super impressed with our Olympus (m4/3) cheap $150 telephoto. You can just see a drop of rain on his claw.

very rare sighting.  we might never see these in the wild...  

Our triplet Osprey chicks are growing fast!  

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I’ve yet to catch a good shot of anything other than sparrows at my seed feeder.

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My sugar water feeder was very popular with the local tui and kāka, to the point where the kāka would pull the bottle out and smash it if it was empty for any more than a few hours. Since we moved though, I haven’t had as many visitors to it.

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I used to get some entertaining “ownership” battles going on... 

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Or often the kāka couldn’t wait for the bottle to be refilled...

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A grey

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followed by a red

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small owl we found on the floor.  Stunned itself on a window we think.  Fed it mince mixed with hair for two or three days and it flew off

 

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step daughter went to a wat (temple)... came out and found this in her helmet

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36 minutes ago, tommays said:



First day out of the nest

7 eggs 6 walked out and sadly only 2 flew away 

 

Gosling prey gotta eat too...  Circle of life..

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OK - so this lady wasn't at the feeder... but that's why she was there.  She's an 8' freshwater crocodile on the Katherine River in the Northern Territory, Australia.  That's a chunk of sausage I've just thrown her in front of her snout on the right side.  Should'a heard the snap of her jaws.

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One from nature's feeder.  Two (of three that were there) Komodo Dragons waiting for the deer at the waterhole.  It's mandatory to have a guide with you on Komodo Island - and our bloke was over the moon about this.  Very rare to see them hunting like this

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I was really pissed off, because I'd drowned my DSLR earlier that week and only had a shitty P&S to get photos of the trip to Komodo Island.  Got closer than my guide was happy with to get this shot, but I was figuring he was well fed, given the blood all over his head

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This bloke was at my feeder.  I'd hand raised him and a sibling from balls of fluffy feathers.  A cat got the sibling, but this bloke stayed around our house for many years, raising his broods.  He's chewing on an apple.

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This turd, a 4 year old wild bull elephant that had been put into a camp after causing trouble in the fields outside the national park border in Sumatra, is chewing on grass I'd just given him.  This pose is him saying "I'm going to kill you".  An elephant expert who saw it and the rest of the shots couldn't believe I'd survived.

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Moments later, he put his right tusk into my left leg, which I ripped away milliseconds before he heaved.  The 300kg of bike and me were tossed 3 metres... smashing that P&S camera mentioned above.  The aftermath

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Fuck feeding elephants.

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Nothing. New suet, new seed. Nothing.

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I think we spend 3 or 4 times the money filling 2 sunflower hearts feeders, than for a bag of dry food for 2 cats, that lasts 6+ weeks.

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On 1/9/2021 at 10:46 AM, usedtobeoldestsailor said:

About 16 wild turkeys, one of these days I am going to invite one in for dinner.

 

I'm sure it will be good, but don't expect it to taste anything like your grocery store Butterball!!! :wacko:

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  • 2 weeks later...

We are having an outbreak of salmonella among finches, mainly Pine Siskins, in NW WA.  We have removed our bird feeders, cleaned them throughly and probably won't hang them again until sometime in February.  We have noticed 5-6 dead birds in the last 3 weeks.  The WA Department of Fish and Wildlife is monitoring the situation and will announce when disease has been controlled.

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We used to feed the birds, but with the increase in squirrels, chipmunks, mice, rats and other rodents haven't fed them for a few years.

Back then they were wary of my wife's trusty .22 LR and our dogs, so were understandably a bit skittish raiding the bird seed on the ground. 

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In 1975 Vivitar introduced the "Series 1" line of lenses. They were intended to compete with the best offerings of the major camera manufacturers, albeit at a very high price -- they were quite expensive even by OEM standards. Nonetheless, discriminating photographers who could afford the price snapped them up and they are still much sought-after by photographers willing to give up auto focus in return for top quality optics, construction and versatility.

The most famous of the Series One lenses was the 70-210 macro zoom. One of the first zooms to offer any kind of macro capability, it offered outstanding optics in a highly versatile package. There were five manual focus versions produced over the years, the first three of which are still very desirable lenses and are in my lens collection all are Nikkor mounts, which I use a modern Canon lens adapter to mount. The last two manual focus versions are of poorer optical quality and are aren't really comparable to the earlier versions.

The first version was the Kiron built f3.5, the second is the Tokina built f3.5, the third is the Komine built f/2.8-4.0. All still do OK by todays standards. The following shots were taken with the Tokina built f3.5 version.

 

 

 

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41 minutes ago, boomer said:

Indeed they do Dorado

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Yup, They migrate through here like a little biker gang. Drink all the liquor. Beat up the boys and chase their womenfolk.

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Yup, They migrate through here like a little biker gang. Drink all the liquor. Beat up the boys and chase their womenfolk.

You got that right Dorado!

 

California Quail taken with a Canon EF 400 f5.6 L USM mounted on a Canon 50D

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14 hours ago, boomer said:

We used to feed the birds, but with the increase in squirrels, chipmunks, mice, rats and other rodents haven't fed them for a few years.

Back then they were wary of my wife's trusty .22 LR and our dogs, so were understandably a bit skittish raiding the bird seed on the ground. 

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I have come to the conclusion that there is no such thing as a squirrel proof bird feeder!!  And 30 bucks for a 20 pound bag of sunflower hearts does not go far when the squirrels come around.  I have taken to shooting them with a low velocity BB gun, just to discourage them, not to kill or maim...

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40 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

I have come to the conclusion that there is no such thing as a squirrel proof bird feeder!!  And 30 bucks for a 20 pound bag of sunflower hearts does not go far when the squirrels come around.  I have taken to shooting them with a low velocity BB gun, just to discourage them, not to kill or maim...

When you do get a feeder that stymies squirrels ... thar be a bear in yer future.

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19 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

Mt thouht woude be bolte somethinge licke a prop shaft zink on the sheppards hooke and place the baffele on topp that, loose so it mooves freeley when the critteres crawlle on it.               :)

 

The feeders hang close enough to the railing that the squirrels can jump to them.  I would have to totally reconfigure the mountings to have that work.

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1 minute ago, billy backstay said:

 

The feeders hang close enough to the railing that the squirrels can jump to them.  I would have to totally reconfigure the mountings to have that work.

And besides, shooting at squirrels is fun.

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On 2/2/2021 at 4:43 AM, billy backstay said:

 

I have come to the conclusion that there is no such thing as a squirrel proof bird feeder!!  And 30 bucks for a 20 pound bag of sunflower hearts does not go far when the squirrels come around.  I have taken to shooting them with a low velocity BB gun, just to discourage them, not to kill or maim...

We now have a Chinese Crested dog. Once known as a Chinese Ship dog. The Chinese crossed a Chinese ratter bred the Powder Puff, with a hairless terrier bred from the east coast of Africa in the 1500s to make a super ratter - then a couple centuries and a half latter crossed this bred with the Mexican hairless for a superior ratter. Fearless, they don't let squirrels, other rodents and male dogs on the property. Like a little Wolverine will attack a bear, making them back up as they tear into their nose and lips. Our little guy has escaped his collar to attack everything from a Blue Heeler to Rottweilers, with them doing rapid 360s backward to escape the onslaught and howling when this little hairball get's his teeth into their precious soft spots. Even our Pitbull/Lab mix male won't dare mess with the little 8.5 lb hairball. There's no breaking them of this habit, other then rocks in a can - rattled, which stops them only for that dog, till the next opportunity. 

He may be a vicious little guy , but he does everything else with a good attitude and they're quite smart and quick thinking. When I first brought him home and after a wander around the property, to familiarize him,  I brought him inside and upstairs to my office. The pound had named George. As he looked about my office, I asked him his name, "You don't look like a George, what's your name Foxy." He turned at once and looked at me. I said, "Is that your name, Foxy?" He came up to me and put a paw on me.  I said, "So Foxy is your name." and he stood on his hind legs in response. I found out latter that Chinese Crested stand on their hind legs a lot, to see over things or distance because they're small, but also for a variety of responses gestures, and for searching for sounds and prey when they hunt.  Chinese Crested like a fox have a strong prey/hunt drive.
 
Leaving the pound we found out he must have come from a non-English speaking family, and didn't know one word of English. Every dog knows - "want to go for a ride", "wanna go bye-bye", "are you hungry", 'wanna eat", "wanna a treat", "got to go poddy"....he didn't know any of those and more, but learned them all and more in a couple of weeks. Chinese Crested also have exceptional hearing, alerting on a spider crawling up a wall and will hear humans, animals or vehicles coming down our driveway, long before anyone or the big dog notices.
 
Linda never takes him out without a leash, except for morning and evening hunts around the property, because he'll sit still for only a moment till his exceptional hearing pics up a noise, his nose picks up a scent or keen eyesight spots a prey. Then he's off on the hunt. Chinese Crested are the Houdini of the dog world. Collars and leashes they can escape in a moment. He detests leashes and will chew threw them. Handing his leash to someone else to hold doesn't always work neither if they don't keep the leash taught and an eye on the Chinese Created, because the moment their back is turned, he'll be out of that collar in the blink of an eye, and they'll be hanging on to a leash and empty collar, huh Tim!
 
Linda takes him on a hunt around the property, gardens and outbuildings in the morning and evening. Turning over or opening places where rodents may be. Linda has timed him dispatching two rodents, humanely breaking their neck with one quick shake, in 10 seconds as pictured blow. The rest of the time he's inside or  outside staked near where Linda is working outside. He likes sitting mostly in the nearby grass, while Linda works in the garden; but knows if he escapes Linda will hunt him down and put him inside. So he sit's, knowing he can escape his collar - sniffing, listening and looking for prey that might be worthy enough for him to escape, and be off and on the hunt.
 
In should be noted that as a habit, Chinese crested aren't all handsome. There are more then a few versions of the Chinese Crested in one litter. Out of one litter, one will get a hairless with a crested head with tufts of hair around the ears, and tufts on the tail and paws, a 50/50 hairless/Powderpuff, a less then 50% hairless known as a wanna be Powder Puff or the Hairy Monster, and the full on Powder Puff. Foxy is a 'Hairy Monster', with a gray patch of fine very short hair less the 3/32" on his back - With white hair so fine it floats, glogging my computers cooling intakes which have to be cleaned every other day.
 
Images shot with a Canon EOS 1Ds2 studio camera and a manual focus lens the Kino Precision built Kiron 100mm macro lens, wide open at f2.8
 
 

 

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1 minute ago, Blue Crab said:

With two you get egg roll.

One's more than enough - between Foxy and my 'darling wife', that's more than enough ferocious creatures in my life. 

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3 hours ago, boomer said:

We now have a Chinese Crested dog. Once known as a Chinese Ship dog. The Chinese crossed a Chinese ratter bred the Powder Puff, with a hairless terrier bred from the east coast of Africa in the 1500s to make a super ratter - then a couple centuries and a half latter crossed this bred with the Mexican hairless for a superior ratter. Fearless, they don't let squirrels, other rodents and male dogs on the property. Like a little Wolverine will attack a bear, making them back up as they tear into their nose and lips. Our little guy has escaped his collar to attack everything from a Blue Heeler to Rottweilers, with them doing rapid 360s backward to escape the onslaught and howling when this little hairball get's his teeth into their precious soft spots. Even our Pitbull/Lab mix male won't dare mess with the little 8.5 lb hairball. There's no breaking them of this habit, other then rocks in a can - rattled, which stops them only for that dog, till the next opportunity. 

He may be a vicious little guy....

 

Holy Crap!!!  Sounds more like a honey badger than a dog!!!  Cute as hell to boot!!  Missus BB had a dog when she was a wee lass, and our elder daughter has a beauty of a fast growing cross breed, but I have always been a cat person, and can't be arsed to tend to the needs of a hound.  We had 2 mature rescue  cats from a relative of a friend who could not longer take proper care of them with her work schedule, are getting three hens and a coop, and everything they need for 3 months from a local guy who has a "Rent-A-Hen" business.  $400 for everything we need, and we can renew the arrangement, or send them back.  So a canine livestock  to care for is not in the offing, but Missus BB is very excited about the hens!!  We should get 18 eggs a week in the spring-summer.

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My wife used to raise all kinds of laying hens from Rhode Island Reds to Leghorns to Sussex to Hybrids all which lay 250 eggs a year. She also raised Plymoth Rocks which usually lay at least 200 eggs a year. However she always liked having a few Banty Chickens, which the Roosters could be as ferocious as a Honey Badger.  We also raised 85-100 Cornish Cross in the spring and at six weeks the butchering process started taking the largest at about 7.5 lbs. in six weeks, and butchering five a day, were butchered out in about three weeks. We also raised ducks and geese. The ducks were a pain, because they shat everywhere. The Toulouse Geese were great watchdogs, and would hatch out over half a dozen goslings each spring for 19 years, till the gander who wouldn't back down from anything, including Racoons, crossed the wrong Arab gelding, and got kicked in the head. We also raised turkeys, which are more fierce than a goose, and any fowl that chose to cross their path, didn't have long to ponder the error of their ways. We also raised rabbits, but rabbit is a dry meat, and the family quickly tired of rabbit - so much so my wife canned the last rabbits we raised, and we'd do stir fry with the meat.

Most small breeds are ferocious, something I didn't know till we got a long haired Chihuahua from my youngest daughter. Though my wife warned me, she had a Pekingese/Manchester, that hadn't met the large dog it wouldn't or couldn't chase off, and that regularly kicked butt on larger breeds. During our early years of mariage, we mostly had cattle dogs, chows, labs and larger breeds like Newfies and Nefie/Chow crosses.

The dog we got from my daughter, Harley - we all called him HarHar for his non-jovial temperament if anyone got close to me or my wife. How we ended up with HarHar was when my daughter and family went on trips and vacations, they left HarHar with us. One time when going on an unplanned trip, they called and asked if they could bring HarHar over, when my wife was in Phoenix helping taking care of my Grandson, when my daughter was coming to the end of her pregnancy with another Grandson. I said, "Sure, but I'm going on a two week cruise and HarHar will have to go with me and Murphy." my Blue Heeler, and they can pick him up when I come back. Well I called them on the Tuesday I got back, and they drove the 40 miles to our house to pick him up. The only problem was, when it was time for them to leave, HarHar stood behind me and refused to leave. Harhar became my shadow and boat dog. No matter the wind, weather or the cold in the winter, Harhar was always up for a sail - and no matter the weather, wanted to stay in the cockpit, to check out the action. Like Foxy, HarHar wouldn't back down from any big dogs and used to piss me off when he'd pick a fight with my neighbors Rottweiler, and I'd scold him and say, " Pick on dogs your own size." - and temperament. Harhar, even treed a bear in our back yard. Funniest thing to see a big old black bear running from a little Chihuahua. I was actually looking for another long haired Chihuahua when I stumbled upon Foxy. 

Pictured: HarHar in the cockpit with Hobot, with the wind chill in the 20s in the winter and the bear HarHar treed, with the bear on the run and HarHar about 10' back and closing a moment before the bear made it to the safety of a big second growth tree. The Toulouse Geese about 43 years ago.

 

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A mommy and one child red shouldered hawk were on the property for many weeks, the mom eating worms out of the field in the morning. Crazy loud screech calling the kid back to the nest or whatever. They moved on last week. Snowy white egrets are stopping by to eat worms. The owls are back now. Big fuckers.

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 A Cooper’s hawk and a Northern Flicker. This is a still from a two minute video I took yesterday morning. The Flicker was screaming incessantly. Hawks have to eat too...the carnage took place in an opening in my arborvitae.CA6CDDBE-C482-436F-B260-D291ED03308D.thumb.png.e509b7a2ba510b5d4c82d1ae28bee9ae.png

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and this one was in the dog's water bucket.  A male Funnel Web spider.  I got bitten by a female, twice... but it's the male that is deadly.  I can still feel, 30 years on, where the female bit me

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8 hours ago, Snaggletooth said:

By size, it lookes moire licke a sharp shinned to me.                          :)

 

I concur on the likely sharp shinned species.   Many years ago I found a dead Coopers Hawk in our driveway.  It was banded, and I called the number on the tag to report it in, and asked if I could have it mounted by a taxidermist.  Reply was no, not possible.  It's illegal to have even a dead bird of prey in CT, maybe all states as far as I know.   Someone from the DEP and collected the carcass a day or two later.

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Had a flock of about 20 Bob White quail come through yesterday. They didn't hang around though.

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1 hour ago, Snaggletooth said:

Stubbled uppon a snowey owle at a localle beache yesterday.   Prettey.                                           :)                           

The only place/time I've seen a Snowy Owl was somewhere near Remsenburg, Long Island, NY in January, probably in the mid-late 60s. I was pretty young. Still young enough to ride on my father's shoulders. Magnificent creature. (The Owl, not my father's shoulders)

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9 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

The only place/time I've seen a Snowy Owl was somewhere near Remsenburg, Long Island, NY in January, probably in the mid-late 60s.

I was juste alittelle south of Remsenburg when I sawe it.                                 :) 

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A few years back we had a scourge of rats in the neighborhood which, some theorize, brought a snowy owl in for a few weeks. Every morning there'd be a cluster of people with tripods on one street corner or another gawking at the owl perched on a rooftop across the street. And then it was gone and hasn't been seen in the neighborhood since. Most of the rats are gone too.

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1 hour ago, view at the front said:

I had one scare the shit out of me when it flew in front of my car windshield in the dark.  It was very close!

I hade the saime thing happen withe Gyrfalcon on the Oceane Parkwaye.                                :)

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I used to feed these when I was still at school.  Had a family group of around 8 or so.  Some would sit on my knee, or fly up and take meat from my hand, whilst flying by

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Another shot of the Rainbow Lorikeet I raised.  He bred in both nest boxes and trees in our yard, raising several broods

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Here with his missus (left) and two kids

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This bloke - a Scrub Turkey - would help himself

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Adult Crimson Rosella

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Saw a mis-labeled stuffed one of those in the Smithsonian a few decades back

Juvenile of same

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Some of the Sulphur-Crested Cockatoos would eat out of my hand too.  When about 30 turned up, my neighbours complained about me feeding them.  This one's been in the nesting hollow somewhere

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Crested Pigeon.  The Indian Turtledoves (feral) compete with these... so I shot about 1,000 of the turtledoves and fed 'em to the goannas.  They eventually got the message.

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Galahs were less frequent, but always welcome

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Louisiana Waterthrush on our suet feeder today, when we are in the midst of a two-week spell of going from refrigerator during the day to freezer each night. Should be in Central America, although I read that they are some of the earliest migrants to head back north. Presumably a male wanting to stake out a territory, just hope he survives the next few days.

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9 minutes ago, TheDragon said:

Louisiana Waterthrush on our suet feeder today, when we are in the midst of a two-week spell of going from refrigerator during the day to freezer each night. Should be in Central America, although I read that they are some of the earliest migrants to head back north. Presumably a male wanting to stake out a territory, just hope he survives the next few days.

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Thick you halve a hermite thrush theire........ 

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see reddish taille, no eiye barre,  and darke legges.

Louisianna Waterthrush;

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see eiye barre, no red taille, no wing barre, litte legges                     :)

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The Wrens are starting to nest. Every open nook, cranny, drawer, shoe box, anything unguarded will have a nest in it by March 15.

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Saw a flock of about 50 Ibis today. Most of them sort of brown/gray speckles, but a few pure white ones. It was kind of unusual to see them in the center of town, in someones yard, and not in a marshy, or waterfront area. They are seriously curious birds! I didn't think to take a phone picture, and I didn't have the camera, so..... Maybe they were Curlews.....

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I'm feeling guilty. . . we got about 12" of snow last night and today.  I usually have 30-40 birds at the feeders, and today there were only 3 or 4 trying to find food, but there is none available from me.

I'm not yet comfortable putting out my bird feeders due to the continuing Salmonella outbreak with Pine Siskins.  There is conflicting information about when to start feeding them again.  Some are saying that we should wait until March?

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20 hours ago, view at the front said:

I'm feeling guilty. . . we got about 12" of snow last night and today.  I usually have 30-40 birds at the feeders, and today there were only 3 or 4 trying to find food, but there is none available from me.

I'm not yet comfortable putting out my bird feeders due to the continuing Salmonella outbreak with Pine Siskins.  There is conflicting information about when to start feeding them again.  Some are saying that we should wait until March?

If you're not eating them raw, or fondling them, there's no real risk. Just wear gloves when you touch the feeder, and if you're really paranoid, wash your hands afterwards with hot water and soap.

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49 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

If you're not eating them raw, or fondling them, there's no real risk. Just wear gloves when you touch the feeder, and if you're really paranoid, wash your hands afterwards with hot water and soap.

I'm not worried about myself, it's the Pine Siskins that are dying.  They've come down from BC, Canada for food in huge numbers and won't return until it warms up.  Our WA Dept. of Fish and Wildlife says to wait to put feeders out again until March 1st in W WA, and April 1st in E WA.

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My surprise is how few birds we had at our feeders today, the coldest day of the year, with low of -5 and high of 5F. Surely they need as many calories as possible to last them through tonight.

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4 minutes ago, TheDragon said:

My surprise is how few birds we had at our feeders today, the coldest day of the year, with low of -5 and high of 5F. Surely they need as many calories as possible to last them through tonight.

Hibernatione is natiuralle reactione to colde tempertiures.                               :)

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7 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

Hibernatione is natiuralle reactione to colde tempertiures.                               :)

Which is precisely why I tie a string to my...…..

We have a Peregrine Falcon who now competes with the Cooper's Hawks for food in our yard...…. they seem to fancy the Mouring Doves. Good thing we have 4 dozen or so of them.

Of late some Dark Eyed Juncos have taken up residence.

Then there is the coyote that has found his way to our wooded area...….. so much for the deer coming to visit.

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22 hours ago, view at the front said:

I'm feeling guilty. . . we got about 12" of snow last night and today.  I usually have 30-40 birds at the feeders, and today there were only 3 or 4 trying to find food, but there is none available from me.

I'm not yet comfortable putting out my bird feeders due to the continuing Salmonella outbreak with Pine Siskins.  There is conflicting information about when to start feeding them again.  Some are saying that we should wait until March?

12”? I guess there’s snow shadow too...

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2 hours ago, Mrleft8 said:

If you're not eating them raw, or fondling them, there's no real risk. Just wear gloves when you touch the feeder, and if you're really paranoid, wash your hands afterwards with hot water and soap.

Department of redundancy department there.....  ;)

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On 2/7/2021 at 7:01 AM, Mrleft8 said:

The only place/time I've seen a Snowy Owl was somewhere near Remsenburg, Long Island, NY in January, probably in the mid-late 60s. I was pretty young. Still young enough to ride on my father's shoulders. Magnificent creature. (The Owl, not my father's shoulders)

Snowy owls are surreal- wingspan and body size do not compute.  In the winter when I was a kid there were some encamped near the house.  Hard to describe what one of them looked when they would unwrap their wings and launch.  The stuff of nightmares.

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5 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

Do you meane snowe bunttings?

We are surrounded by Canada on 2 sides.  Metaphors abound, eh?  No lunchbirds right now.  Mores the pity....

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Just now, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

flocks of robins and cedar waxwings  fighting for all the berries they could find before the cold weather hit..

dointe worrey ...... the fitteng wille continue ounces the colde weathere hittes .............             :)

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3 hours ago, view at the front said:

I'm not worried about myself, it's the Pine Siskins that are dying.  They've come down from BC, Canada for food in huge numbers and won't return until it warms up.  Our WA Dept. of Fish and Wildlife says to wait to put feeders out again until March 1st in W WA, and April 1st in E WA.

Why? Do sunflower seeds have salmonella? (I'm serious) I've never heard of bird seed having Salmonella.... Green mold, and bugs, yes, but....

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34 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

Why? Do sunflower seeds have salmonella? (I'm serious) I've never heard of bird seed having Salmonella.... Green mold, and bugs, yes, but....

It's not the birdseed, it's the bird shit that spreads the salmonella from bird to bird.  They are not very fastidious with not mixing feeding and pooping.  I wash my feeders weekly to remove their deposits, but apparently it not enough.  Usually Canada sends us good things, but apparently their birds come here contaminated.