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My sons $1 dollar boat gets a re-fit.


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49 minutes ago, Windward said:

Ha ha...

Memories of stuffing all the windsurfing gear belowdecks.

Good times.

It's the one thing that's pushing me towards kite surfing - the kit is a lot smaller!

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On 5/15/2020 at 4:59 AM, Kris Cringle said:

I took a closer look at the Island Packet mysterious aft cabin. The boat hales from San Francisco. She's been in Maine at least 10 years. Strange areas on the topsides that someone started sanding a few years ago then seemed to drop the whole thing and walked away. 

 

She's a goner for sure. 

903713456_IPaftcabin._.thumb.jpg.c0f83bfcf6450f3d666c69f13fa7b840.jpg

 

At lest the Lichens have not started yet. Maybe some alge/moss

Someone with time will take it.

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  • 3 weeks later...

We don't have the long history, but used to do that with my parents when they had an Alerion. They are looking at a SeaSprite 34 that's in nice condition so maybe we can do it again. 

 

ACtC-3fg4ab0ccLmX15xC78n2pYFxQ5FK-nu-t1E

 

 

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  • 2 months later...

I've had this mooring for over 20 years. Last Saturday I spent my first night onboard on the mooring.

Our harbor is a funnel shape cut into the granite, and the opening faces due South. The fetch is from South Africa. The wind was blowing from the North at 5 to 15 so it was flat as a millpond overnight. 

I had no intention but to take photos, enjoy dinner and see what goes on out there, overnight. 

I saw someone sail off the inner docks and head out into the channel. 

919273352_NAMOsailingoffthedocks.thumb.jpg.168d94a712df69a19d1eb074bd5c4aee.jpg

You have probably guessed who it was. My son was sailing out to meet a friend on his 25' boat, which cost more than a dollar, but not significantly. 

1962732137_NAMOsailingoffthedocks2.thumb.jpg.e6d91512e3552c2ce23b3a70273d0655.jpg

We had a quick chat as he went by and then continued on with texts.

He moved back shortly after his office went remote in Boston in March. He's here to stay, come what may in this new era. Our daughter, living and working in NYC is moving back next week. 

Dom and his girlfriend in his Hunter 25 were waiting anchored off Vinalhaven.

A lot of them (local kids) have come back in this strange time. They grew up here, these kids, right on this harbor. They act like they own the place. 

Ha, I chuckled as he sailed by. They do own this place. I remember that feeling when I was his age. 

1897693009_NAMOsailingoffthedocks3.thumb.jpg.42d978e0cb7bf2e4db60c4526923f565.jpg

He had a good 8 NM to cover and it was already 5 oclock. Late start. I remember doing that too. He's a natural sailor though, he can move the boat. 

But, even though we stopped texting a few minutes after he left the harbor, I sent one more at 7:08 :

You ok? 

Sure am!

That was it.  

 

 

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1 hour ago, Kris Cringle said:

I've had this mooring for over 20 years. Last Saturday I spent my first night onboard on the mooring.

Our harbor is a funnel shape cut into the granite, and the opening faces due South. The fetch is from South Africa. The wind was blowing from the North at 5 to 15 so it was flat as a millpond overnight. 

I had no intention but to take photos, enjoy dinner and see what goes on out there, overnight. 

I saw someone sail off the inner docks and head out into the channel. 

919273352_NAMOsailingoffthedocks.thumb.jpg.168d94a712df69a19d1eb074bd5c4aee.jpg

You have probably guessed who it was. My son was sailing out to meet a friend on his 25' boat, which cost more than a dollar, but not significantly. 

 

We had a quick chat as he went by and then continued on with texts.

He moved back shortly after his office went remote in Boston in March. He's here to stay, come what may in this new era. Our daughter, living and working in NYC is moving back next week. 

Dom and his girlfriend in his Hunter 25 were waiting anchored off Vinalhaven.

A lot of them (local kids) have come back in this strange time. They grew up here, these kids, right on this harbor. They act like they own the place. 

Ha, I chuckled as he sailed by. They do own this place. I remember that feeling when I was his age. 

1897693009_NAMOsailingoffthedocks3.thumb.jpg.42d978e0cb7bf2e4db60c4526923f565.jpg

He had a good 8 NM to cover and it was already 5 oclock. Late start. I remember doing that too. He's a natural sailor though, he can move the boat. 

But, even though we stopped texting a few minutes after he left the harbor, I sent one more at 7:08 :

You ok? 

Sure am!

That was it.  

 

 

Oooh, Thunderhead in the background! Nice!

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On 7/22/2020 at 9:26 PM, Elegua said:

We don't have the long history, but used to do that with my parents when they had an Alerion. They are looking at a SeaSprite 34 that's in nice condition so maybe we can do it again. 

 

ACtC-3fg4ab0ccLmX15xC78n2pYFxQ5FK-nu-t1E

 

 

I have never seen something like this on a full size boat. Is that a jib boom swiveling right behind the luff?

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27 minutes ago, allweather said:

I have never seen something like this on a full size boat. Is that a jib boom swiveling right behind the luff?

It's a Hoyt Jib Boom. It sheets from the end to control draft and how far it articulates. It makes the Alerion very easy to single-hand. 

https://www.forespar.com/products/sail-hoyt-jib-boom-system.shtml

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Today I learned... that these are in fact a full size thing on modern boats.(Only seen it on rc model sailboats before :)
That does sound really nice for greater wind angles where an ordinary self tacking jib is less ideal. I don't think I would go for it, but can really see the appeal.
 

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It just struck me.  I read this whole thread from start to here in one sitting.  I started sailing as a child on sunfish, flying juniors, Hobies etc.  Stayed away from boats for 40+ years and then took a three week RYA coarse, chartered a few and eventually bought a 43' footer.    Until reading this I didnt understand the reason for the 25' sailboat.  Sure I have been on a few of out day-sailing with no destination or schedule but the purpose of cramped smelly little boats eluded me.

Now I know.  and I can see that they are perfect $1.00 investments.

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On 9/24/2020 at 10:28 AM, Dogscout said:

It just struck me.  I read this whole thread from start to here in one sitting.  I started sailing as a child on sunfish, flying juniors, Hobies etc.  Stayed away from boats for 40+ years and then took a three week RYA coarse, chartered a few and eventually bought a 43' footer.    Until reading this I didnt understand the reason for the 25' sailboat.  Sure I have been on a few of out day-sailing with no destination or schedule but the purpose of cramped smelly little boats eluded me.

Now I know.  and I can see that they are perfect $1.00 investments.

$1 boats are hard to love, we've found out. Without love, a boat may never shine again. 

But they are handy tools! These dog-eared neglected boats that are old enough the be their owner's fathers are gluttons for this abuse.

'NAMO is out sailing more often than most of the yachts it sails by,  coming in and out of the harbor at all hours of the day and night. 

173884219_NAMOsailingoffthedocks2.thumb.jpg.675af31f62cf1ddb32cfa601d0cb6a44.jpg

 

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  • 1 month later...
  • 3 weeks later...

As the season ends and the sea turns gray, the sailing life simmers. The kids are talking about covering the $1 boat but I wouldn't bet on it. 

My son taught himself fly fishing this season. He's really gotten into that and has progressed to tieing his own flies. I know the passion well as it hit me at a much younger age. 

I also knew that when he caught his first trout, a jewel like Brook trout, he would be hooked on the passion. This week, he caught that first Brookie (and released it). 

2140654307_TTBrooktrout..thumb.jpeg.fd333ec42dde73156b192ca40a4b38a4.jpeg

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  • 3 weeks later...

@Kris Cringle  They've put enough sweat into that boat that now they are motivated to preserve it.

This seasonal de-masting and wrapping of boats that you go through each year is depressing. I think I could tolerate it if I could store mine in a shed that allowed me to work on it all winter.

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16 minutes ago, Ajax said:

@Kris Cringle  They've put enough sweat into that boat that now they are motivated to preserve it.

This seasonal de-masting and wrapping of boats that you go through each year is depressing. I think I could tolerate it if I could store mine in a shed that allowed me to work on it all winter.

I think Southerners (with all respect) fear cold. It sounds like a cliche' but only bad clothing will leave you depressed (and cold!). It's just layers, you get the hang of it quickly. 

1440120582_BeechHillPeaKathTomandStephen.thumb.jpg.935d860fe79a02463fc8f87787fcd772.jpg

And there is plenty of indoor storage, it will cost about 3 times outdoor space. And in fact, it maybe colder than outdoor. For about 5 times the cost, you can have that space heated.

But why would you want to work on your boat all winter? That's obsessive. :) Just put a coat on it and forgetaboutit. 

Cover_2020.thumb.jpg.2f0a57271bf3182af1b71016664fea58.jpg

Fire and ice, winter is a time to recharge, switch gears.

Go outside and enjoy the air, then head inside and enjoy the warmth. Fry some sage leaves in olive oil instead of cleaning the head on your cold boat. :) 

20019180_Thanksgiving2020cooking.thumb.jpg.92cf17177c1b8485c39a64078d425920.jpg

 

The seasons are all over too soon. 

 

 

 

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I have got onboard with having quality winter clothing so that I'm not a hostage to the indoors.

The Chesapeake is on the border of where the jet stream flips and flops. Some winters are mild and some winters get down to 10 or 11F and the bay freezes over and we call in ice breakers. Smith Island becomes isolated and they helo food out to the residents.

Every year, my wife and I rent a cabin out in western Maryland up in the mountains for a long weekend. I love that kitchen photo. Cooking with gas, cast iron and all the fresh veggies looks wonderful.

Didn't you spend one winter crafting an entire new cockpit for your boat that dropped in neatly, like a module?

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54 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

Fry some sage leaves in olive oil

Kris, do you dip the leaves in batter? If you have enough leaves, that can make it a main course. :P

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I don't fear cold, but I don't like it. Been thru a bunch of winters in the Great Plains where a sunny nice day turns into a sub-zero night.

I've never winterized a boat though, and I don't plan to start now. You guys up in the Frozen North are welcome to come down for our winter series as long as you promise to not move here and then try to explain how much better things are back up north.

FB- Doug

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31 minutes ago, Ajax said:

I have got onboard with having quality winter clothing so that I'm not a hostage to the indoors.

The Chesapeake is on the border of where the jet stream flips and flops. Some winters are mild and some winters get down to 10 or 11F and the bay freezes over and we call in ice breakers. Smith Island becomes isolated and they helo food out to the residents.

Every year, my wife and I rent a cabin out in western Maryland up in the mountains for a long weekend. I love that kitchen photo. Cooking with gas, cast iron and all the fresh veggies looks wonderful.

Didn't you spend one winter crafting an entire new cockpit for your boat that dropped in neatly, like a module?

 

Good on the clothing. I feel sorry for people who can't get out in the cold. I think guys like you, Dylan, Judd all enjoy your winters. I don't think of your climes as 'year round' sailing, but you have longer seasons than the extremes at the north and south. I think year round sailing on our left and right coasts requires constant moving with the seasons to enjoy the best of it. 

I designed and built these three dormers on this roof about 8 years ago, during the winter, unassisted I'm proud to say (especially in that I sewed them back into the ancient slate tiles). People on the street have told me those dormers have always been there. :) 

 

271521143_Lesherdormerscomplete.jpg.efa5c49c8e9e6062395cc2d0f52527a0.jpg

By contrast, working in a warm shop is relaxing. 

I spent a winter on that cockpit but I also worked full time (which I'm still doing). That was a pleasant project for me and my bench dog.

328956202_Benchdog(1of1).thumb.jpg.161735028e3a2ff914b731e2278786a7.jpg

I kept the project laid out so that I could leave it for days, weeks, but turn the heat on in the shop and get lost in the details for a few hours. I rarely spend anytime time working onboard in winter. Too brutal under there. I still get a thrill using that cockpit 5 years on. Thanks! 

 

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5 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Your house is marvelous. It really has a homey feel, the kind of place that you could stay in for a lifetime.

Thanks! It's been a labor of love (ever since the construction loan ran out,...). My wife is standing in the 1850 section which we saved, my daughter is in the 2000 section which we redesigned and built as that section had fallen in due to being uninhabited for 20 years. 

 

This was taken in 2000. We've recently hired some guys to do it again(scrap and paint). What a relief for me that was! 

1948336328_ScrapingpaintingTP2copy.jpg.02e26810b926d615cf7919b11fe560d0.jpg

 

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1 hour ago, Kris Cringle said:

I spent a winter on that cockpit but I also worked full time (which I'm still doing). That was a pleasant project for me and my bench dog.

328956202_Benchdog(1of1).thumb.jpg.161735028e3a2ff914b731e2278786a7.jpg

I keep reading about how handy it is to have bench dogs on hand for paint and varnish jobs but I find I get much better results without them.

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6 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

I think Southerners (with all respect) fear cold. It sounds like a cliche' but only bad clothing will leave you depressed (and cold!). It's just layers, you get the hang of it quickly.

I grew up in the desert and I much prefer too cold over too hot.

Far easier to deal with.

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5 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

 

Good on the clothing. I feel sorry for people who can't get out in the cold. I think guys like you, Dylan, Judd all enjoy your winters. I don't think of your climes as 'year round' sailing, but you have longer seasons than the extremes at the north and south. I think year round sailing on our left and right coasts requires constant moving with the seasons to enjoy the best of it. 

I designed and built these three dormers on this roof about 8 years ago, during the winter, unassisted I'm proud to say (especially in that I sewed them back into the ancient slate tiles). People on the street have told me those dormers have always been there. :) 

 

271521143_Lesherdormerscomplete.jpg.efa5c49c8e9e6062395cc2d0f52527a0.jpg

By contrast, working in a warm shop is relaxing. 

I spent a winter on that cockpit but I also worked full time (which I'm still doing). That was a pleasant project for me and my bench dog.

328956202_Benchdog(1of1).thumb.jpg.161735028e3a2ff914b731e2278786a7.jpg

I kept the project laid out so that I could leave it for days, weeks, but turn the heat on in the shop and get lost in the details for a few hours. I rarely spend anytime time working onboard in winter. Too brutal under there. I still get a thrill using that cockpit 5 years on. Thanks! 

 

Are you tag teaming with Jules to make me feel inadequate?

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