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dinghy with sail that can be raised/unfurled on the water


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I'm looking for a dinghy that I can launch from a dock which sits on a narrow channel. There are structures on either side of the channel. As I result, I can't let the boom swing freely; it would hit the structures on either side of the channel. I plan to paddle out of the channel and raise/unfurl the sail once I'm in open water. Additionally, I have to store the boat in slings on its side--out of the water--when not in use. I'm separately working on a runout beam to work the slings.

 

Most of the dinghies with halyarded mains don't look like good candidates; I don't foresee being able to work my way far enough to the bow of something like the Aero to get the main raised & halyard secured and scramble back to the cockpit in time to control the boat. I also foresee difficulty working around the boom while it's resting in the cockpit while I paddle out.

 

I've also written off most of the sleeved mains (like a Laser) I've seen; unless I can easily (un)furl them, I think those would also be a challenge. Those also would have the same boom-in-cockpit problem.

 

All of this has led me to the RS Zest. It has a furling main (by rotating the mast), and the mast sits inside of a collar for the boom, so the boom stays out of the way. The boat is a little heavier than I'd like, but aside from that, it seems to be the only solution.

 

I wanted to throw this out to the message board to see if any of you know of another boat that I'm just not aware of. I'm a full-sized adult, so many of the young-adult boats (e.g., Topper Taz) might be both cramped and under-powered for me. I appreciate any brilliant insights from the board!

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What about finding a locally available boat that you can modify by putting slides on the luff of the main instead of a bolt rope. Then all you need to do is to sort out a decent halliard system with a cleat mounted on the side of the mast near the foot or on the deck adjacent to the mast. There must be something you can find at a great price that only needs a few bucks spent on it to make it work perfectly for the environment you mention above.

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Hard to find as there are just 100 of them, Expedition 14.5 is a Laser2 hull with furling carbon mast and Hoyt boom. Paddles well standing up with a SUP paddle. This one was in the craigslist thread recently.

https://m.sailboatlistings.com/view/80171

 

vanman3.jpg

There is a Capri 14 with a similar tin rig too, don't know anything about it.

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This might be a good place to ask about this..... I have a Port Townsend Boat Works PT-11 as a tender. This has the sailing rig that they supply. The mast and boom are all carbon with a fairly thin wall. The mast is breakdown, it comes apart in two pieces that sleeve together on a 10" sleeve joint. The mainsail slips over the mast inside a sewn pocket (just like the Sabot I grew up sailing)

I wonder how folks here would suggest converting the rig to one that could be furled and even reefed.

We are on a circumnavigation on a 40' trimaran so both we need to keep the solution compact and light weight. Thanks for the input!

Medium.JPG

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31 minutes ago, 2flit said:

This might be a good place to ask about this..... I have a Port Townsend Boat Works PT-11 as a tender. This has the sailing rig that they supply. The mast and boom are all carbon with a fairly thin wall. The mast is breakdown, it comes apart in two pieces that sleeve together on a 10" sleeve joint. The mainsail slips over the mast inside a sewn pocket (just like the Sabot I grew up sailing)

I wonder how folks here would suggest converting the rig to one that could be furled and even reefed.

We are on a circumnavigation on a 40' trimaran so both we need to keep the solution compact and light weight. Thanks for the input!

Medium.JPG

It's nice to see someone out there cruising full time with a PT11. I'd love to hear more about your experience using it. 

My experience with the sailing rig is with the soft section, it's pretty easy to de-power with the vang and outhaul. When you hike, it just bends off. I've not needed to, but I believe the top batten might be short enough to wrap the sail a time or two around the mast.  

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OP says " store the boat in slings on its side--out of the water--when not in use. I'm separately working on a runout beam to work the slings"

We need more info.

My Finns weres stable enough to go right forwards and hoist the sail. However the above quote seems to rule it out.

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14 hours ago, SeattleSLU said:

I'm looking for a dinghy that I can launch from a dock which sits on a narrow channel. There are structures on either side of the channel. As I result, I can't let the boom swing freely; it would hit the structures on either side of the channel. I plan to paddle out of the channel and raise/unfurl the sail once I'm in open water. Additionally, I have to store the boat in slings on its side--out of the water--when not in use. I'm separately working on a runout beam to work the slings.

 

Most of the dinghies with halyarded mains don't look like good candidates; I don't foresee being able to work my way far enough to the bow of something like the Aero to get the main raised & halyard secured and scramble back to the cockpit in time to control the boat. I also foresee difficulty working around the boom while it's resting in the cockpit while I paddle out.

 

I've also written off most of the sleeved mains (like a Laser) I've seen; unless I can easily (un)furl them, I think those would also be a challenge. Those also would have the same boom-in-cockpit problem.

 

All of this has led me to the RS Zest. It has a furling main (by rotating the mast), and the mast sits inside of a collar for the boom, so the boom stays out of the way. The boat is a little heavier than I'd like, but aside from that, it seems to be the only solution.

 

I wanted to throw this out to the message board to see if any of you know of another boat that I'm just not aware of. I'm a full-sized adult, so many of the young-adult boats (e.g., Topper Taz) might be both cramped and under-powered for me. I appreciate any brilliant insights from the board!

Mirror.

 Small, light, manageable, can be stepped for single or double handed (or sailed s/h with jib). Hell, you could anchor it and hoist on the hook once you were out of the channel if you wanted... Can also be rowed, which might be handy.

Cheers,

               W.

 

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Yep my thoughts exactly - a Mirror Dinghy - honestly it's a really great all round design - Sails well, Rows well, somewhere to stow the anchor, oars stow neatly out of the way (if you have the original pattern oars), will take a small outboard, its light and stable.  

Look no further.

IL

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5 minutes ago, WGWarburton said:

Mirror.

 Small, light, manageable, can be stepped for single or double handed (or sailed s/h with jib). Hell, you could anchor it and hoist on the hook once you were out of the channel if you wanted... Can also be rowed, which might be handy.

Cheers,

               W.

 

Untitled.thumb.jpg.82ab89879c3d9a694f4c0ed7d762c189.jpg

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Check out the RS Zest. The sail furls around the 2 part mast, super easy to step with foolproof the modern designed mast gate.

Options include a rowing kit, which the bench is perfectly placed to row from, and a mast bag to go around the furled sail once it's down.

 

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All,

 

Thank you all very much for the great responses! You've given me some ideas to work with.

 

@Major Tom ... I hadn't really considered the idea of modifying whatever I could find locally. I'll start looking.

 

@Dex Sawash... the Expedition 14.5 is in the wheelhouse, but I think you're right that finding one of the 100 hulls may be challenging. Meanwhile, the Capri 14 is ~200 lbs heaver than some of the other boats, so I don't think I'll pursue that one.

 

@Bill5... the Expo 12.5 is also right in the wheelhouse of what I'm looking for. Thank you!

 

@Dart96... I can't store it on our deck that abuts the channel, and I can't store it in the water (blocks the channel for folks upstream from us). I've figured out how to sling it up on a sliding rail system that runs perpendicular to the channel. So: once it's derigged, run out the a cantilevered rail which suspends weighted slings from a block, swing the hull 90*s from our deck, paddle into the slings, then pull the slings up. This is why I have to be mindful of hull weight. The Finn runs a little heavier than some of the other boats on my list.

 

@WGWarburton & @seasider3563... I hadn't considered a wooden boat, but I'll take a look at the Mirror as well.

 

@RSsailingNA... the Zest is already on my radar.

 

Once again, thanks to all of you for your helpful suggestions!

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Both a Laser and a Sunfish can be considered although some of the other solutions that have been offered may be more elegant

The sail on a Sunfish can be raised while on the water and with the sail down, the boat can be paddled. The sail should be rolled up and kept in place with the sheet. This works better with an improvised tiller tamer (shock cord attached to the sides). 

On a Laser I would not attach the clew to the boom. This allows the sail to flap freely with the boom resting on the deck. Again a shock cord to keep the tiller in place would be helpful. Once in open water it's not too hard to attach the clew (I use a clew hook), unless it's really windy. 

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A Banshee (if you could find one) would work here, too.  Most were made with sock type sails, but some (mine included) are hoisted via the halyard.  I think all up the boat weighs 120 lbs, and one was for sale recently in SC (?).

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The Topaz (bigger version of the Topaz/Topper Taz you've already considered) has a roll-on-the-mast main too.

I also like the Sunfish suggestion.

Looks like you have lots of options. See what you can find locally, at decent price, etc. 

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On 5/9/2020 at 5:20 PM, Elegua said:

It's nice to see someone out there cruising full time with a PT11. I'd love to hear more about your experience using it. 

My experience with the sailing rig is with the soft section, it's pretty easy to de-power with the vang and outhaul. When you hike, it just bends off. I've not needed to, but I believe the top batten might be short enough to wrap the sail a time or two around the mast.  

The force 5 class had a sleeve that was zippered, with a grommet at the top of the mast for the exterior halyard (but inside the sleeve).  Worked well.  Probably would work well on any sleeved sail.  I think Henry Bosset, North Sails east coast, if he’s still in the game would be able to help.  For leaning on it’s side?  Something light... but stiff.   Force 5 or Laserish? Small cockpit....

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8 minutes ago, Amati said:

The force 5 class had a sleeve that was zippered, with a grommet at the top of the mast for the exterior halyard (but inside the sleeve).  Worked well.  Probably would work well on any sleeved sail.  I think Henry Bosset, North Sails east coast, if he’s still in the game would be able to help.  For leaning on it’s side?  Something light... but stiff.   Force 5 or Laserish? Small cockpit....

Thanks, Amati. I'm ok with the sail and rig as is...It's a 10lb carbon rig with 54 square foot sail on a 90lb dinghy with some very nice foils - it's pretty zippy as is -  and can carry a decent load under sail.  Because the rig is fairly soft and adjustable, you have to be in some pretty stiff breeze to overpower the boat. 

2flit is looking for a reefing option.  I'm actually I'm interested by Russel's larger sail.

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On 5/15/2020 at 1:23 AM, efrank said:

Hobie Adventure Island or Tandem Island?

They are heavy.

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19 minutes ago, fastyacht said:

A tandem hobie sailed into harbor one day. I was impressed by the ease of furling.well thought out design.

Yes they furl nicely.  Well thought out design, just try lifting one.

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