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30 minutes ago, Schakel said:

It's done layer by layer with laminated wood and glue.

Mmmh, really so they laminate wood, and then do it layer by layer.

If you think its translation error, nope, plywood is multiplex, laminated beams are gelamineerde dragers.
We do not have plywood tillers, they are laminated tillers.
He is just not good in research. Does not know much about boatbuilding or design. But thinks he knows it.
And not criticize him or try to improve his knowledge, you will be a bad guy.

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6 minutes ago, LeoV said:

Mmmh, really so they laminate wood, and then do it layer by layer.

If you think its translation error, nope, plywood is multiplex, laminated beams are gelamineerde dragers.
We do not have plywood tillers, they are laminated tillers.
He is just not good in research. Does not know much about boatbuilding or design. But thinks he knows it.
And not criticize him or try to improve his knowledge, you will be a bad guy.

Its easier to have the idiot on ignore.

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5 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

I would think that is more of a decorative trim element that hides the cabin to deck transition. That yacht looks like it could use some grab rails for safety.

It is both, the Koopman's build not by yards like Hutting and Breehorn are normally dark caves due to short coachroof and deep floors.
Those yards design all but the hull and sailplan and improve on Koopman's work. If you like his style buy one of these, but they are not cheap.
And this one in the photo has a long coachroof I think, see location mast strut.
 

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For the record, I laminated the 5 foot long teak tiller for my 40’ composite cutter rig sloop. The decks are marine plywood with dynel cloth and West Systerm epoxy. The cabin beams are laminated and the cabin sole is marine plywood with 1/2” Douglas fir boards glued to them. 
 

Pic below is during a dry fit to find the best length for the tiller without impeding on the winches.

 

8A385152-CC74-493A-A123-E70A5F42CC9E.jpeg

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1 hour ago, mad said:

Its easier to have the idiot on ignore.

Then you don't have to think

 

1 hour ago, LeoV said:

Mmmh, really so they laminate wood, and then do it layer by layer.

If you think its translation error, nope, plywood is multiplex, laminated beams are gelamineerde dragers.
We do not have plywood tillers, they are laminated tillers.
He is just not good in research. Does not know much about boatbuilding or design. But thinks he knows it.
And not criticize him or try to improve his knowledge, you will be a bad guy.

To ply means buigen en meerdere lagen.
I had a english built dragon (Tucker & Brown) with a lot of plywood.
d-dragon.jpg.b5f362bc15384ea801bf6be383e4f417.jpg
They sold me as such. Give a luxurious appearance.
Sail for Beer shows how's it's done.

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1 hour ago, Sail4beer said:

For the record, I laminated the 5 foot long teak tiller for my 40’ composite cutter rig sloop. The decks are marine plywood with dynel cloth and West Systerm epoxy. The cabin beams are laminated and the cabin sole is marine plywood with 1/2” Douglas fir boards glued to them. 
 

Pic below is during a dry fit to find the best length for the tiller without impeding on the winches.

 

8A385152-CC74-493A-A123-E70A5F42CC9E.jpeg

That's pretty damn cool.

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1 hour ago, Schakel said:

Then you don't have to think

 

To ply means buigen en meerdere lagen.
I had a english built dragon (Tucker & Brown) with a lot of plywood.
d-dragon.jpg.b5f362bc15384ea801bf6be383e4f417.jpg
They sold me as such. Give a luxurious appearance.
Sail for Beer shows how's it's done.

Drooling over that dragon. Too bad Jammersix  isn’t here to tell you how lovely that is and how it needs a complete cruising complement belowdecks. He quit when I found his true identity and let Bob Perry know. He was a stalker extraordinaire!

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15 hours ago, Schakel said:

I had a english built dragon (Tucker & Brown) with a lot of plywood.

They would be insulted if you told them that.

Hint; look at orientation of fibres in plywood contra laminated wood.

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On 5/26/2020 at 4:39 PM, Liquid said:

Love that interior. Is that a continuous grab rail?

 

19 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

I would think that is more of a decorative trim element that hides the cabin to deck transition. That yacht looks like it could use some grab rails for safety.

More like a constructional than just a decorative trim element, that reinforces and hides the cabin to deck transition.

Normally it's also a gutter to catch condensation from the windows, but not so much in this case.

It gives enough grip to pull yourself up, but nowhere enough in a bit of seaway.

 

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On 5/12/2020 at 4:23 PM, jack_sparrow said:

Here is the progression for guidance.

If past a guide they haven't quite reached point of launching the 30/40 footer range yet. Simple numbering continued indicates middle of the road.

The pandemic may alter plans there in terms of final product release. Many anticipating a surge in the nimble cruiser market people wanting getting away and self sufficiency feeling etc.  

- 1970's Generation "Firsts" smallest was around 20' I think up to 40'+ IOR.

- 1980's Generation Firsts up to 20' to 50' They put a 3rd fraction in numbers so the big selling First 405 was a 40 footer.

- 1990's Generation Firsts. This was the sexy period and my favourite Stark and Pinifarina interiors bolted onto Farr or Berret. 30' - 53' above the biggest in range. The numbering changed with addition of a F for Farr or S for Stark and confusing.

- Late 1990/Early 2000 Generation Firsts.  This coincided with more mass production techniques and in IMO quality took a tumble.  More utilitarian than the sexy Italian look. Back to 80's numbering but with use of a .7 to signify performance I think.  40.7 probably the most well known. Biggest a 47.7 I think.

- 2000's Generation Firsts Continuation of the .7 range. Biggest 34.7 but the earlier generation 7's still being built.

- Late 2,000/Teens Generation Firsts. Models 20' - 50' The First 40 very popular in IRC. Mixture of designers from Briand Farr to JK's First 30 which was a real fizzer. The Sense plus Oceanis range introduced late in this period was a bit confusing as many thought it indicated maybe an end of the First line. 

- 2019/Early 20's Current First Generation. The top of the range model this 53 footer then selection of 20 footer plus sports/cruisers. They did have a 40 something but put it off and are clearly not in a rush to fill the 30/40 foot range yet and keeping their powder dry waiting market to stabilise 

You forgot the 80's first class series (first class 7, 8, 10, 12, Figaro, Europe) which were the proper racing boats Many cheese eating sailors of my generation have worn out a few set of foulies on the class 8 which was the French J24 (but more fun ;-) )

 

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22 hours ago, Schakel said:

Then you don't have to think

 

To ply means buigen en meerdere lagen.
I had a english built dragon (Tucker & Brown) with a lot of plywood.
d-dragon.jpg.b5f362bc15384ea801bf6be383e4f417.jpg
They sold me as such. Give a luxurious appearance.
Sail for Beer shows how's it's done.

you're looking at a cold molded dragon... only plywood is in the deck structure... (it's used to lay the teak on)

first guess: this is a Doomernik dragon

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I had an First35R for a year.
Super tall carbon rig and a wheel through the deck and a deep rudder. It scared the wife too much so it had to go... great boat Plus,, it Drew way to much to keep locally. 
I contemplated a Starret Janks model after that but wound up with my cutter and a Catalina 42 instead. 

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11 minutes ago, daan62 said:

you're looking at a cold molded dragon... only plywood is in the deck structure... (it's used to lay the teak on)

first guess: this is a Doomernik dragon

can't be a Doomernik... (always polyester hull)

second guess: BB dragon...

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2 minutes ago, daan62 said:

can't be a Doomernik... (always polyester hull)

second guess: BB dragon...

and then checked google... not a wooden hull... blue polyester... and indeed a Doomernik!

so it's not even a wooden boat we are looking at... but still underneath the teak deck is a layer of plywood!

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On 5/26/2020 at 11:28 AM, Raz'r said:

That's pretty damn cool

I have tons of teak and figured I’d go for a hefty tiller for a masculine appearance. 
 

Took 7 boards, ran them together through a thickness planer for even thickness and then ran a grinder across both faces tor give the epoxy something to key into.

I drew the shape I wanted onto a table until I got it looking right. I covered it with clear plastic sheeting so the layup wouldn’t become part of the table and screwed 4 inch wide blocks of 2x4wood on the outside of the convex curves. Then I wiped the boards down with acetone to remove oils and drive the rest back into the grain, let them off gas for 15 minutes  as I mixed up the epoxy. I then brushed the epoxy onto each face and stacked them up as one and flipped them all onto their side and worked them loosely through the blocking before wrapping the top with more plastic and applying clamps to each block until cured. 
 

The tiller looked nasty until I ran the grinder over it to lose the excess epoxy. The board set up or down a little from the table but I made the laminate extra wI’d to account for any slip. I was then able to shape the wood with a Mirka high speed random orbital sander after I cut that ends off to the proper length. 

A9B8DBF4-705C-4C73-8B98-158589BA814E.jpeg

C7A3C5C8-2BD5-4AB6-B7CA-E90C1EE07445.jpeg

4B9F8FC2-5799-4C2C-A23C-BEBC5C3EF2A8.jpeg

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I may carve a decorative head figure into the end, that’s why the shape is a little  odd right now.

It has 8 layers and is shaped down to 5 at the narrowest point.

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How was the result?
The plied wood at sea railing looks classic as well.

It's oldfashioned but apreciated tecnology.
This is plywood madness, hope some people hold their humour.
A plier is a tool to ply things with.. For the dutch lost in translation..

Back to the first 53, looks like million dollar.
And she isn't..
1897471305_beneteaufirst532.PNG.c9cdc5b5e083348ae35cd5d71beecda8.PNG

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Of course we have drifted way off. 
 

If you have the money buy it.

If you don’t like it, total it(by accident;) )! Great thread 

 

 

And the plied mahogany taffrail is beautiful, but definitely a rarity.  I couldn’t bear to remove it and install stanchions and lifelines...

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15 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

If he buys it I’m a little Covid free and would like to be a crew member for a few...days, weeks...is there enough deep water in Delft?

Scheveningen harbor provides a nice scenery for competetive sailing.
North-Sea-Kurhaus.jpg.69c9a5867251dce46b3044a72b117897.jpg
It's a bit chilly outside the summer.
In the winter we have the ijspegel race. Icicle races.
https://www.jachtclubscheveningen.com/ijspegel
ijspegel.PNG.d88764960cfbe1800c7b3aaeff97eb2d.PNG

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On 5/27/2020 at 12:43 PM, Schakel said:

How was the result?
The plied wood at sea railing looks classic as well.

It's oldfashioned but apreciated tecnology.
This is plywood madness, hope some people hold their humour.
A plier is a tool to ply things with.. For the dutch lost in translation..

Back to the first 53, looks like million dollar.
And she isn't..
1897471305_beneteaufirst532.PNG.c9cdc5b5e083348ae35cd5d71beecda8.PNG

Well, buy one then dopey. 
 

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On 5/27/2020 at 7:43 PM, Schakel said:

How was the result?
The plied wood at sea railing looks classic as well.

It's oldfashioned but apreciated tecnology.
This is plywood madness, hope some people hold their humour.
A plier is a tool to ply things with.. For the dutch lost in translation..

Back to the first 53, looks like million dollar.
And she isn't..
1897471305_beneteaufirst532.PNG.c9cdc5b5e083348ae35cd5d71beecda8.PNG

sounds like advertisement...

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On 5/29/2020 at 12:16 AM, Monkey said:

Well, buy one then dopey. 
 

It's somewhat more complicated,
The cold northsea isn't the kindest of waters for these boats.
Cold and heavy pounding waves.
It's more more for the medeteranian.

but I like the open boat experience she offers.
Dufour 530 provides shelter but isn''t as sexy. with a sprayhood.
675548080_Dufour530.thumb.jpg.d20da01a009e89933fc2ce290dd3639e.jpg
without the sprayhood she looks like this.
Dufour-530-01.thumb.jpg.1d9b7ee9f272ee8b11e46118f03c143a.jpg

and the german Hanse and Dehler by Judel en Vrolijk.
It's a competitive market.
Dehler 46:
1452468175_Dehler462.thumb.PNG.77a71dc51bcc5cd7e261355e9271d829.PNG
https://www.dehler.nl/en/dehler-46/#afbeeldingen
Hanse 548:
hanse_548_exterior_sailing_022_2017_07_27_exterior_575_v2.thumb.jpg.9862a36f10dd5e850c5a6bf020bb9e97.jpg
http://hanseyachts.hr/range/hanse-548/#info

And no, it's not advertisment,
it's interest.

But still, the new beneteau first.

I going to follow this, which, of the above, is fastest at the races?"
Line honours and Irc and Orc to make it even more interesting.
Race schedule to follow:
2020-events-programme2020_print_final.pdf
And I am aware Corona killed most events...
 

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Considering how similar those boats are it's curious how the Dehler manages to be so much better looking than the others.

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17 hours ago, savoir said:

All are supposed to be cruisers yet none are photographed with dodger or bimini in position.

Despite sailing in relatively cold waters we quite often sail with the dodger down (like on the Delher photo) and you don't see many biminis around here. Nevertheless when beating against a cold wind and at night the dodger is definitely up!

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11 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Considering how similar those boats are it's curious how the Dehler manages to be so much better looking than the others.

From experience I know they are fast as well.

39 minutes ago, Panoramix said:

Despite sailing in relatively cold waters we quite often sail with the dodger down (like on the Delher photo) and you don't see many biminis around here. Nevertheless when beating against a cold wind and at night the dodger is definitely up!

Brittany, france is gorgeous but near certain shores you don't want to sail your boat....
1990857139_IledeSein.PNG.3727b6204dc13d3fec0857395024ff1e.PNG
 

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5 minutes ago, Schakel said:

From experience I know they are fast as well.

Brittany, france is gorgeous but certain shores you don't want to sail your boat....
1990857139_IledeSein.PNG.3727b6204dc13d3fec0857395024ff1e.PNG
 

Raz de Sein is alright, the tide takes you from one side to the other whether you want it or not! :o If you don't end up the side you want, try again 6 hours later.

Joke aside I went up your way and found sailing for hours between a sandbank and the coast more stressful than going through the raz de Sein as you have to be paying attention for a long time! I suspect that you guys find this relatively easy but when you get used to something it becomes easier.

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On 5/31/2020 at 8:53 AM, savoir said:

All are supposed to be cruisers yet none are photographed with dodger or bimini in position.

this is probably because the photos are from sales brochures and generally boats look shit with them. Also, depending on where you cruise and the owners preferences, dodgers and biminis are setup differently.

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20 hours ago, Panoramix said:

Raz de Sein is alright, the tide takes you from one side to the other whether you want it or not! :o If you don't end up the side you want, try again 6 hours later.

Joke aside I went up your way and found sailing for hours between a sandbank and the coast more stressful than going through the raz de Sein as you have to be paying attention for a long time! I suspect that you guys find this relatively easy but when you get used to something it becomes easier.

preparation...

sometimes you can even tie two tides together... when coming from the south of England and going north to the Netherlands or Belgium you can tie two tides together and make a remarkable distance... (if i remember right it's just over 8 hours of current from the rear (or the front if you screw up badly))

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7 minutes ago, daan62 said:

preparation...

sometimes you can even tie two tides together... when coming from the south of England and going north to the Netherlands or Belgium you can tie two tides together and make a remarkable distance... (if i remember right it's just over 8 hours of current from the rear (or the front if you screw up badly))

Yes going up the channel is definitely easier as tides of eastern parts are late compared to western parts. So if you time well when you are at crucial points(like North of Cherbourg if coming from west), you definitely get extra miles for free as you get more time with you than against you.

Another good one if timed properly is that if you get to the Portsall cardinal buoy early enough (that is still with some current against you) you can manage the Four plus raz de Sein in one tide, flying past St Matthieu with a strong current, then  just early enough to make the raz de Sein in time and eventually having to shelter against the turning tide close the shore of the "Baie d'Audierne". If you miscalculate (not enough wind or southwesterly or too late at the chenal du Four entrance), you've earned the opportunity of admiring Thévennec and la Vieille for 4 or 5 hours!

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4 hours ago, Panoramix said:

Yes going up the channel is definitely easier as tides of eastern parts are late compared to western parts. So if you time well when you are at crucial points(like North of Cherbourg if coming from west), you definitely get extra miles for free as you get more time with you than against you.

Another good one if timed properly is that if you get to the Portsall cardinal buoy early enough (that is still with some current against you) you can manage the Four plus raz de Sein in one tide, flying past St Matthieu with a strong current, then  just early enough to make the raz de Sein in time and eventually having to shelter against the turning tide close the shore of the "Baie d'Audierne". If you miscalculate (not enough wind or southwesterly or too late at the chenal du Four entrance), you've earned the opportunity of admiring Thévennec and la Vieille for 4 or 5 hours!

Well, it's pretty,
1024px-Tevennec.thumb.jpg.64935427ea9a23688092772e70c47711.jpg
but 4 to 5 hours? But have you have no choice.
A bit sinistre, one of the heirs of the Michelin company, (Tires, maps, and many other carservice related items) ,  Édouard Michelin,  died at Raz de Sein.
In a fishing trawler, no damage, she hit a rock, capsized and sank!

Liberte.PNG.d5e4efe40c75fc1a182814e5e48325c9.PNG
|https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raz_de_Sein
Tecnnical description of the shipwrecking. ( In french)
http://sauvmer.free.fr/operatio/michelin.html
The boat was found two days later with no apparent damage, 70 meters deep and roughly 15 km from the Île de Sein

@Panoramix Why not sail around it in open seas?


 

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25 minutes ago, Schakel said:

Well, it's pretty,
1024px-Tevennec.thumb.jpg.64935427ea9a23688092772e70c47711.jpg
but 4 to 5 hours? But have no choice.
A bit sinistre, one of the heirs of the Michelin company, tires, maps, and many carservice related items ,  Édouard Michelin,  died at Raz de Sein.
In a fishing trawler, no damage, she hit a rock, capsized and sank!


|https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raz_de_Sein

Yes, 4 or 5 hours is the standard rate... You would need a seriously fast boat to go against the tide and a boat that doesn't mind the steep and short chop that you find there.

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6 minutes ago, Panoramix said:

Yes, 4 or 5 hours is the standard rate... You would need a seriously fast boat to go against the tide and a boat that doesn't mind the steep and short chop that you find there.

A wise decision, seaworthy....
It's exciting to sail over there, builds up the tension.
If you can handle it, you are a master of the sea.
 

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13 minutes ago, Schakel said:

A wise decision, seaworthy....
It's exciting to sail over there, builds up the tension.
If you can handle, it you are a master of the sea.
 

For some people it is their "office". I don't know how they manage it, at least on a sailing boat if you miscalculate a wave, you know that the boat will "come back", on the kind of boats they have, it must be not that hard to be rolled by a wave.

 

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1 hour ago, Panoramix said:

For some people it is their "office". I don't know how they manage it, at least on a sailing boat if you miscalculate a wave, you know that the boat will "come back", on the kind of boats they have, it must be not that hard to be rolled by a wave.

 

Yep it's tough. Nova Scotia has 15 metres tide.

 

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3 hours ago, Schakel said:

Yep it's tough. Nova Scotia has 15 metres tide.

 

this looks more like 15 feet than 15 meters imho.

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On 5/22/2020 at 8:40 PM, Amati said:

She’s got a 3/4 rig & 22.5 degree sweep on the spreaders, cathedral rig, so it boils down to the rig taking it or not.  Tip washout, or some drive up there?.... but talking to some sailmakers about that is like talking to a wall...a small square head would be nice

Amati,

    I'd like to hear more of your users report on that Hoyt Jib. You have had it on the boat for many years right? I might be interested in buying the boom and hardware if you decide to replace it with a more modern free flying headsail as you mentioned earlier. 

    PM if interested!

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9 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

Amati,

    I'd like to hear more of your users report on that Hoyt Jib. You have had it on the boat for many years right? I might be interested in buying the boom and hardware if you decide to replace it with a more modern free flying headsail as you mentioned earlier. 

    PM if interested!

Anything specific you’d like to know?  The reason I like self tacking jibs was sailing Solings in the early 70’s, and it was precise, complicated, expensive, and sooo good to be able to tack on every gust cell upwind, and really get the right shape.  The downside is that it’s something to climb over on the bow, the jib got smaller to get more leech control- the luff got shorter.  I put an outhaul control (Amsteel) that controls leech downhaul and camber which helped a lot, but it was a quick and dirty experiment which meant a shlepping up the the bow to fiddle with it.  I think a track on top of the boom would be a better approach than the sheet card, which is heavy, sharp edged, and flails when luffing.  You could get lines running back to the back of the boat for that, but it’s getting a bit complex, as you’ve got a mainsail type boom set up.  And as long as that is going on, an adjustable vang on the boom on a gooseneck would be a bit more straightforward, maybe like a Star Vang?.  And then you probably need to strengthen the deck.  Etc etc.  But all that said, off the wind, the Hoyt is magic, with the main or not.  But we are a light boat, so even in 20k DDW, we’re doing 8 K, and given how placid that is (even in 30 K), no main, it’s great..  The stern wave was detached a bit, but that happens a lot w/o planing.  The jib foot also is cut high to get it over the lifelines without binding, so it gets kind of  tiny, but it is a nice higher wind sail, and I can see where Pacific Seacraft is coming from as far as a Solent.  I’ve never sailed an Alerion or a Schock, so I can’t comment there. 

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2 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

So you have mentioned swapping out the Hoyt for a different larger jib, is that going to happen?

Depends on the stock market & some other stuff in about about  9 months to year. My intention is to go with as big a deck scraper upwind only blade I can stuff into the fore triangle with a track, and then have a bigger something depending on a bigger main & what kind of light air performance I’m getting.  So some balls in the air- what does your time line look like?

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On 6/13/2020 at 4:54 AM, MauiPunter said:

I dig that First 53.  Cool looking boat.  What’s it rate?  50s?

It can be raced with a crew of 6,
2077297540_Beneteufirst53.PNG.364accd7cc7ec88fff430d97b5bcb8e8.PNG
Video with action. Looks great.

 

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Whatever it rates, imagine standing on the bow at sunset and the feeling of relief that you bought a boat with cockpit lamps so you can see your way back to the helm and the lady.

6EF0D4F4-746D-4C06-84E9-BE00B7077910.png

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4 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

Whatever it rates, imagine standing on the bow at sunset and the feeling of relief that you bought a boat with cockpit lamps so you can see your way back to the helm and the lady.

6EF0D4F4-746D-4C06-84E9-BE00B7077910.png

Those lamps are practically mandatory. Or where you would hang lantern? 

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1 hour ago, Sail4beer said:

Whatever it rates, imagine standing on the bow at sunset and the feeling of relief that you bought a boat with cockpit lamps so you can see your way back to the helm and the lady.

6EF0D4F4-746D-4C06-84E9-BE00B7077910.png

Where is the vase of flowers?

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On 6/17/2020 at 3:52 AM, eastern motors said:

-33.  Can it possibly be that fast?

http://www.phrfne.org/page/handicapping/base_handicaps

2276 boats are being classified in this page.
This the top 20:
1394480754_PHRFrating.PNG.e97b7c3089ee4b3f7629ad2f8d02cfa0.PNG
This one is fastest according to this measurement, it has a different pricetag (€ 2,050,000) but, you're faster then a TP52. She is carbon build.
BLACKLEGEND3.jpg.182f414a066f65e19a81ce75c80a071c.jpg
00005BPC_Code2_JokaGemesi-PaugerCarbon-1
https://blackpepper.fr/en/code-2-en/

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Black Pepper also build this smooth riding Imoca 60.

 

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When I see these boats painted black, all I can think about how hot that must get in the warmer latitudes.  Careful where you sit.  lol

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Defo at the top end of piggy bank savings rankings….

20190816_esk_0926.thumb.jpg.f0325506c80b24f6c43e983d607cbf05.jpg

20190816_esk_0076.thumb.jpg.17a847e2cf16b4db3c7c8a5e92f14919.jpg


However C A N O V A must get a mention in the performance cruiser thread, especially with its innovative DSS wing option.

As an side the nauti museum at Amsterdam is a must do for any serious sea-salt.

Toodle-pip...

 

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I saw a Dehler 46 over at Catalina last weekend.  I thought it was a really great looking boat.  The others, with the big square windows in the topsides, enough! Especially when they are different sizes and look randomly placed, gawd.

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1 hour ago, savoir said:

The bow roller folds out of the anchor locker.  It wouldn't be very strong.

Maybe I’m missing something from the pictures but it seems like from where the bow roller is located, the chain could get easily crossed up on the bobstay in certain conditions.

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On 6/28/2020 at 2:04 AM, savoir said:

If you guys want something fancy then the first of those high fallutin' new Hinckleys has just hit the market.  Cheap too.

https://au.yachtworld.com/boats/2015/hinckley-bermuda-50-sloop-3611642/

US$ 1,16 mln  is a somewhat different price tag then US$ 681,707;  almost a double price.
But the Hinckley has a lifting keel furling headsail and more pushbutton facilities.
13.7 ton from the Hinckley versus 15.5  from the Beneteau, the Beneteau is 3 foot taller
https://ancasta.com/boats-for-sale/new-boats/beneteau-sail/first-yacht/yacht-53/

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On 6/28/2020 at 1:04 AM, savoir said:

If you guys want something fancy then the first of those high fallutin' new Hinckleys has just hit the market.  Cheap too.

https://au.yachtworld.com/boats/2015/hinckley-bermuda-50-sloop-3611642/

I don't think they should have used the photo where the chap looks like he's having a piss over the side in the marketing.

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45 minutes ago, European Bloke said:

I don't think they should have used the photo where the chap looks like he's having a piss over the side in the marketing.

way to 'real life' for an advertisement...

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3 minutes ago, daan62 said:

way to 'real life' for an advertisement...

On board sailing boats without a in board toilet, a regulair action.
For the ladies we have this fantastic option.
puts-met-lijn.thumb.jpg.4ed8b6c48c97d5c28b2ba220384b054b.jpg

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10 hours ago, European Bloke said:

I don't think they should have used the photo where the chap looks like he's having a piss over the side in the marketing.

 

A man's gotta do what a man's gotta do.

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7 hours ago, TUBBY said:

Still use the overboard option with 3 onboard heads!  Until it gets REAL nasty out there.

if you don't use it you don't have to clean it...

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On 6/30/2020 at 5:07 AM, Schakel said:

On board sailing boats without a in board toilet, a regulair action.
For the ladies we have this fantastic option.
puts-met-lijn.thumb.jpg.4ed8b6c48c97d5c28b2ba220384b054b.jpg

A more discrete option you can keep in your handbag...

AFB7B28E-3527-4BD8-81EA-D7F180E2FAA6.jpeg.ae7d09b3e793b5c5155fefb88605361e.jpeg

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 6/27/2020 at 8:28 PM, rwaterman said:

I saw a Dehler 46 over at Catalina last weekend.  I thought it was a really great looking boat.  The others, with the big square windows in the topsides, enough! Especially when they are different sizes and look randomly placed, gawd.

I recently saw two Dehler 42s in Long Island Sound, and was able to board one of them. They look great in the water and the interior is beautiful. They both had aluminium rigs. I wonder what the PHRF rating would be if they had the upgraded carbon rig?

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On 5/12/2020 at 3:58 PM, mathystuff said:

"Hey Bob, can you lay out the steering position for the new boat?"

"Sure. What do you want? Weather protection? Feeling of safety in heavy weather and during manouvers?"

"Nah. Fuck that. Make it as scary, uncomfortable and dangerous in any bad weather as possible. Think of the guy who bangs your ex now and imagine him tranfering it across the north atlantic while you take the jet."

"God, I hate that fucking douchebag."

"That's the spirit!"

"What I really like is when you're close hauled, just really going for it, you know you should have a reef in but fuck it lets go that's what the keel's for, and then a gust hits and it lays over and you have the opportunity to fall at least ten vertical feet."