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I got the itch and some cash. Couple that with difficulty going far and away to sail I started looking for another boat.

Came across a Gulf 29 sitting on a trailer in Texas. I found it while looking at a C&C 29 MKII that I'm sure would sail circles around the Gulf.

Does anybody know about these pilot house boats? Are they well built, how do they sail, any known issues to look for other than the usual stuff inherent to old boats, is there much storage?

Intended use is to put it on Dillon for the summer season then maybe, just maybe head to SoCal for a mid winter escape.

https://oklahomacity.craigslist.org/boa/7107204978.html

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The pictures in the yachtworld listing are more revealing (In a bad way). Not sure its worth the asking price. You could easily put 10K or more into it without getting into cosmetics. If it were local to me I would probably offer half of what he wants if I could budget the cost of getting it fixed up. 

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2 hours ago, Ajax said:

To my surprise, it doesn't look horrible.

Bill Garden designed it so naturally it looks good.

I sure wish he knew how to make them as fast as he made them beautiful. Could you imagine if all the Leaky Teakies pirated from him had been designed like Night Runner?

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The Gulf 29 and the Gulf 32 are VERY different animals.  Nor Cal PHRF has the Gulf 29 at 204  (I looked it up)...the Gulf 32 is at 264.  That makes the Gulf 32 about the same speed as a Cal 20.

Gulf 29, underbody......same hull, same keel as a Newport 28. The Pilothouse was stuck on the 28 hull, because the Gulf 32 sold so well, and  Gulf/Newport...Capital yachts wanted a smaller offering aimed at the same market.  The Gulf 32 cabin was "inspired" by Bill Gardens design on the 32, but he didn't actually do it.

22581_grande.jpg?v=1488653616

Gulf 32

HaulOut06Fin.jpg

 

I used to teach sailing at an outfit that had a Gulf 32. You couldn't GIVE me a Gulf 32. On the other hand, I'd happily sail a Gulf 29 around, say...Puget Sound, someplace like that.

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Now, if I wanted to bash to windward all day in 40 knots, then the Gulf 32 is great.  If I wanted a dock-condo in the 32 foot range, then you bet.  I cannot imagine a more UN-fun combination than a Gulf 32 and light So. Cal conditions.  Yuck.

but that's just me.

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I called the guy, he is done sailing due to age and distance from the boat. It has spent all it's life on Texas fresh water lakes. He states everything works however most everything is original including standing rigging.

If it's still around when my next week of commitments are through I'll run down and have a look see. For the right price you never know.

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That's actually a pretty good looking boat. Make sure the bunks are long enough for a human. Vee berths on smaller boats tend to only have foot space for 1. 

Original standing rigging might be ok. Original cushions most likely are not. 

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Here I go, trashing the Gulf 32.  Hey, it's not, emphatically NOT the boat for me. But we all know that out there is some guy, or some couple who have a Gulf 32 and they love it to pieces.

Diff'rnt strokes and all that.

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There is something to be said for a moslty original old boat. Hopefully it has not been messed up by prior owners and should be pretty simple overall. I have no experience with Gulfs, but I do with Newports on which it is apparently based according to Alan H. Newports were good looking nicely designed boats with larger than expected interiors. They were lightly built compared to their competitors, but seem to do fine in protected PNW waters. On a boat this age condition may be more important than origanil build quality.

As an aside since you are pretty experienced with trailers, does that one look a littlle lightly built for the load?

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I know a guy who sailed his Newport 33 from Cali to Hawaii and back, three times.  So i always wonder about that "lightly built" thing that I hear about Newports, all the time.

I don't KNOW, myself....but I wonder.

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11 hours ago, steele said:

There is something to be said for a moslty original old boat. Hopefully it has not been messed up by prior owners and should be pretty simple overall. I have no experience with Gulfs, but I do with Newports on which it is apparently based according to Alan H. Newports were good looking nicely designed boats with larger than expected interiors. They were lightly built compared to their competitors, but seem to do fine in protected PNW waters. On a boat this age condition may be more important than origanil build quality.

As an aside since you are pretty experienced with trailers, does that one look a littlle lightly built for the load?

The owner stated the trailer was built for that boat when it was new. Surge brakes, which I dont care for, heavy enough axles with new tires. 2 5/16 ball which means at least they planned on a hefty load.,The frame rails will need close inspection as well as the rest of the structure.

This is all dependent on it still being there after we get back next week and me actually getting off my ass and make the 25 hour round trip drive to see it.

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8 hours ago, Alan H said:

I know a guy who sailed his Newport 33 from Cali to Hawaii and back, three times.  So i always wonder about that "lightly built" thing that I hear about Newports, all the time.

I don't KNOW, myself....but I wonder.

I agree, there were quite a few Newports on my dock, and there seemed to be a consensus that they were underbuilt, but this may have been in comparison to most boats of that era being overbuilt. There were areas in my old Tartan's deck and hull over 2 inches thick, all solid glass or glass and ply.

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9 hours ago, Alan H said:

I know a guy who sailed his Newport 33 from Cali to Hawaii and back, three times.  So i always wonder about that "lightly built" thing that I hear about Newports, all the time.

I don't KNOW, myself....but I wonder.

Most of them are still sailing so...

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2 hours ago, steele said:

I agree, there were quite a few Newports on my dock, and there seemed to be a consensus that they were underbuilt, but this may have been in comparison to most boats of that era being overbuilt. There were areas in my old Tartan's deck and hull over 2 inches thick, all solid glass or glass and ply.

If the Gulf 29 is based on the Newport 28, this Kretchmer review may or may not be helpful:

http://sailingmagazine.net/article-577-newport-28.html

IIRC, the biggest gripe with Newports was the poorly-designed and leaky hull-to-deck joint. Maybe Gulf addressed that with its new deck design, or maybe not. I'd certainly look closely at it. Cheap thru hulls are an issue too, but if original to the boat, you might want to include rationalizing & replacing those at the top of the to-do list regardless. 

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 5/17/2020 at 11:48 AM, Diarmuid said:

If the Gulf 29 is based on the Newport 28, this Kretchmer review may or may not be helpful:

http://sailingmagazine.net/article-577-newport-28.html

IIRC, the biggest gripe with Newports was the poorly-designed and leaky hull-to-deck joint. Maybe Gulf addressed that with its new deck design, or maybe not. I'd certainly look closely at it. Cheap thru hulls are an issue too, but if original to the boat, you might want to include rationalizing & replacing those at the top of the to-do list regardless. 

Yeah,  I considered a Newport 41 once many, many eons ago.  I stopped considering once I saw the plastic thru hull valves.  Didn’t look or feel like a ball valve and certainly wasn’t like a Jen-YOU-Wine bronze seacock .  Appeared to be held in place by some hardened splooge oozing out.  But, as  others have noted,  ‘most’ of ‘em are still afloat....

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Well, you know, "most" Beneteau's are still afloat....and "most" Cals...and "most" Tartans...and most Santana's....and most Pacific Seacrafts...   so are most Morris Yachts, or Custom built boats by big name, high-end yards.     Kind of goes to show that boats built during that 70's to 80's era are up to handling what the vast majority of people use them for, and have been for a long time.

 

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Exactly.

To listen to the typical comments out there, you are taking your life in your hands stepping onto anything less than a Swan.

The automotive equivalent of the prevailing attitude would be that anything less than a Bentley is a dangerous POS.

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Ronnie Simpson, who admittedly is not your typical sailor...managed to sail from California to Australia in a Cal 29. I sailed from California to Hawaii in 1998 in a Ranger 29 with new standing rigging, but old sails and an Atomic 4 that would only run for 15 minutes at a time because ...I didn't know this....the water pump impeller was shot.

I see the men and women in Petit Bateau, or who do the Jester Challenge cross the Atlantic in  everyday sorts of boats.

I think the OP who is thinking of doing some coastal cruising in a Gulf 29 is going to be just fine. Do the usual things...make sure the mast stays up by inspecting and replacing standing rigging if it's needed. Make sure the sails are functional.  make sure the bulkheads aren't ripping out of the boat. Tap around to see if there's any delamination in the deck.

if you just have to replace some through hulls, then do it at the next haulout. If they're plastic and they've been there since 1980,  they're probably not going to fail tomorrow while you're pooping around on Lake Texawhuppee....

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I had a Newport 41s with a tall rig,  sailed great even overloaded.  Sail like a big proformance dingy.  Sailed her on the coconut milk run.  It did well, but lacked accommodations for additional crew on crossings.  My wife cried when we sold her and picked up the new to us Kaufman 47, which we have had for almost 19 years.

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