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My boat has a one-piece companionway washboard, roughly 24" X 24" probably ½" to ¾" thick. It's 1980 vintage plywood. I painted it a couple of years ago with one part poly topside paint. It's holding up OK, but I wouldn't mind replacing it. I'm thinking of King Starboard or marine grade teak plywood. The Starboard would be sterile, but low maintenance; the teak would be nice looking (I'm a Cetol user) but more maintenance. Cost difference is not that much.

So I'm wondering if there are other considerations. Thoughts? Concerns?

Thanks.

P.S. The companionway is not off-set. :P

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My drop boards are made from 1/2" G10. Heavy, but not that much heavier than Starboard. They are bulletproof (perhaps literally). It is a stable material, so paint lasts a long time on it. If you wanted to lighten, make from 1/4" G10, laminate strips along the edges to thicken them to 1/2 to fit your slot. An advantage of Starboard is when you drop it on the deck it won't make as big a hole. 

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1 hour ago, Jules said:

If you use plywood, the edges need to be well sealed from moisture absorption. 

Do you have any pictures?  It would help a lot in helping you.

Don't have any pics now, and it will be several days before I can get to the boat - high lake levels from spring rains means a swim to dock.

I agree on the edges of plywood. That's where the paint seems to chip on my current ply wood board, despite primer, and three coats of paint.

2 hours ago, DDW said:

My drop boards are made from 1/2" G10. Heavy, but not that much heavier than Starboard. They are bulletproof (perhaps literally). It is a stable material, so paint lasts a long time on it. If you wanted to lighten, make from 1/4" G10, laminate strips along the edges to thicken them to 1/2 to fit your slot. An advantage of Starboard is when you drop it on the deck it won't make as big a hole. 

Not worried about weight. The current plywood ain't exactly light weight. Interesting that G10 takes paint. Would I need a primer if I used TotalBoat Wet Edge one part polyurethane topside paint?

The other thing is that the washboard isn't plumb, that is, it is designed on a slant. The bottom edge is a little aft of the top edge.

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Would now be the time to make smaller drop boards - perhaps dividing the space in two - so that they’d be easier to stow?  Making an additional top section with a screen might help make overnights more comfortable too.  Starboard wouldn’t have to be painted. 

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Tinted plexi.

make two pieces with the center cut angled so water runs off - the shingle effect.

Far preferable to solid doors - lets in more light, one can be left out for ventilation if needed etc.

You can lighten them up by making them 1/2 the current thickness and doubling the edges with strips of the same material so they fit the slots.

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Unless you’re doing heavy duty offshore stuff, Id think of Azek or Kleer, the PVC trim board used in house construction.  It needs no painting and is lots lighter and less expensive than Starboard.  If your opening is 24” square, I’d break it into two or three boards, maybe making one or two extras with screened openings, maybe even a window.   The top and bottom edges of adjoining boards should have a shiplap rabbet.

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Since G10 is epoxy, I'm not sure if there is much point in epoxy primer. I'd just sand and hit it with topcoat. 

What you make them out of depends on your goals. G10 will last forever and be as secure as it gets. Plexi or plastic is pretty easy to push in, by a thief or a wave. But might let light in, be lighter, or other advantages. 

If you split them, put a step in the joint with a router - much more weatherproof than a slant, also a slant tends to push one forward and one aft. I wouldn't do that with plywood as it will delaminate there, but G10 or plastic, no problem. 

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48 minutes ago, Bull City said:

I agree on the edges of plywood. That's where the paint seems to chip on my current ply wood board, despite primer, and three coats of paint.

I made a temporary washboard while I was refinishing the originals.  Actually, I made it just before Dorian was threatening us.  Anyway, in the time from Dorian to the time I started working on the original washboards, the plywood temp didn't fit as well.  So I cut the bottom and one edge to make it fit.  The entire temp board was finished with epoxy and varnish, with the exception of the sides I trimmed.

I thought refinishing the washboards would be a week, at most.  I was wrong.

In the meantime, the construction plywood temp washboard sat out in the elements, with the bottom and one side bare.  I feared it would swell so much I wouldn't be able to remove it.

It wasn't that bad removing, though it was a bit sticky.  What surprised me was that, despite all the rain we've had in this time, the plywood was still in pretty good shape.  The sealed edges were unaffected.  But the raw wood edges weren't that bad.  They had swelled but the laminates hadn't failed. 

West Systems makes a Special Clear hardener (207) that stays clear after it cures.  If you go with teak plywood, this would be a good choice for sealing it.  Follow up with a good UV finish and you should be good for a while.  Just make sure the finish has fully cured.  I had one incident where I didn't wait long enough and removing the washboards caused the finish to come up off the companionway trim.  

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If the washboards lean forward some - like most do, a notched step will hold water.

A 45 degree angle joint is dead easy to cut on a table saw with an 80 or 100 tooth blade. Just sand the cut smooth and wave a torch over the edge - it will look the same as the other edges.

I made them up like that for my Hunter to replace the thin teak ones - worked like a charm - never a leak of a jam or any other sort of problem.

 

g14 b.JPG

g14c.JPG

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Probably a dumb question, but, have ya thought about using some planks of a pretty-grained wood that you keep varnished?  Curly Maple?  Teak?  white Oak?   You wouldn't have the worry of plywood delamination, and if you keep up w/the coatings, they shouldn't suffer any swelling/checking from absorption.   

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24 minutes ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

Probably a dumb question, but, have ya thought about using some planks of a pretty-grained wood that you keep varnished?  Curly Maple?  Teak?  white Oak?   You wouldn't have the worry of plywood delamination, and if you keep up w/the coatings, they shouldn't suffer any swelling/checking from absorption.   

Not a dumb question at all. I've thought about traditional washboards. If I went that way, I'd use teak for consistency and durability. I'd be concerned about (1) cost, (2) using a wood that kind of endangered, and then (3) f**king it up and ruining the wood.

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6 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Not a dumb question at all. I've thought about traditional washboards. If I went that way, I'd use teak for consistency and durability. I'd be concerned about (1) cost, (2) using a wood that kind of endangered, and then (3) f**king it up and ruining the wood.

https://www.plasteak.com/   ??? 

 

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I replaced my ply washboards with ones I made from corecell foam, carbon and glass.

The edge was solid glass for around 1/2  an inch so it wouldn't get damaged when not in position. 

This just edged  6mm M80 foam and all sheaved in carbon to make sure it was stiff enough for the task. 

There are two and below is a pic of the top one.2014108373_hatchfinished.thumb.jpg.4d1e9d85fa408bfb0e1a3c3ff237f677.jpg 

 814096089_Hatchbeforepainting.thumb.jpg.6a66cc1d1ee204f1bd79171c15fe66c9.jpg 

 

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5 hours ago, Bull City said:

I've thought about traditional washboards. If I went that way, I'd use teak for consistency and durability. I'd be concerned about (1) cost, (2) using a wood that kind of endangered, and then (3) f**king it up and ruining the wood.

There is sustainably grown teak available.  It's not on the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.  But it is expensive.  Around here it's over $100 bd/ft.

Cumaru, a LOT cheaper (about $5 bd/ft here), can look very much like teak when finished.  It's commonly used for exterior decking and can last decades.  But it's noticeably heavier.  Shouldn't be a problem for washboards though. 

Teak is on the bottom, cumaru on top.

CumaruPatch_01.jpg.f1a64072808df7a0f366de9d5015a58a.jpg

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On 5/27/2020 at 6:27 PM, SloopJonB said:

Tinted plexi.

make two pieces with the center cut angled so water runs off - the shingle effect.

Far preferable to solid doors - lets in more light, one can be left out for ventilation if needed etc.

You can lighten them up by making them 1/2 the current thickness and doubling the edges with strips of the same material so they fit the slots.

This^^. We had enuf 3/8" cast acrylic (medium grey smoke) left over from the foredeck hatch to build split drop boards. We thickened the outside edges to fit the slots using some 1/8" clear plexi (local glass shop had some drops they just gave me). also beefed up the top of the upper board where the latch goes, and added a water-shedding 'batten' where the two boards meet. The plexi lets in quite an amazing amount of light, makes the boat feel bigger when buttoned up, but you can't see in at all from outside. 

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16 hours ago, basketcase said:

built these for a friend a few years back. light, stiff, strong.

wash 2.jpg

wash1.jpg

care to share your technique and materials? I was thinking of a similar project for my boat.

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I personally would take any of the myriad of suggestions here over starboard. I just don't love the stuff, I think it would likely end up bowing on you sooner than you might think, it's effing heavy, and it looks nice RIGHT UNTIL IT DOESN'T... I've just found that it doesn't clean up as well as you'd think it would. Full disclosure that I work in a yard that specializes in wooden boats, so we try and talk customers out of starboard in general, but I like the other suggestions (up to and including sealed edge plywood) over starboard.

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2 hours ago, ryley said:

care to share your technique and materials? I was thinking of a similar project for my boat.

Carbon, corecell, carbon. All vacuum bagged. Cut to size. Cap the edge with carbon under bag. Light sand. Paint.

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1 hour ago, suider said:

I personally would take any of the myriad of suggestions here over starboard. I just don't love the stuff, I think it would likely end up bowing on you sooner than you might think, it's effing heavy, and it looks nice RIGHT UNTIL IT DOESN'T... I've just found that it doesn't clean up as well as you'd think it would. Full disclosure that I work in a yard that specializes in wooden boats, so we try and talk customers out of starboard in general, but I like the other suggestions (up to and including sealed edge plywood) over starboard.

Aesthetic preferences aside, I made some Starboard hatch boards to replace plywood boards on a daysailor I used to own and they were great. I used 1/2" thick white and routed the horizontal edges at an angle to get the rain shedding effect. They never warped, never swelled, never chipped or chipped anything else, and they stayed looking pretty good with nearly zero attention. I could see how if you're a perfectionist they might benefit from a blast with a pressure washer every few years but a wet microfiber cloth cleaned them up pretty well in about 30 seconds.

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On 5/29/2020 at 1:47 PM, basketcase said:

Carbon, corecell, carbon. All vacuum bagged. Cut to size. Cap the edge with carbon under bag. Light sand. Paint.

its a bit more complicated than that.... there was some pretengineering and sanding between coats of paint.....

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Another thing, the plywood washboard I have now is original to the boat - 1980. When I renovated the boat five years ago, I made an acrylic washboard, but I kept the old one. The acrylic one was thinner than the channel, so gorilla-brain B.C. Gorilla-glued a couple of teak blocks to the inside face to fill the channel. They didn't last long, so I stripped the old washboard, primed and painted it. It has a plexi/acrylic window, so it's not too dark. I also made a nice screen washboard that works well. I still have the acrylic one. 

A one piece washboard works fine for us. The original painted board is OK for now, but I think an upgrade is in the near future. I'd be more comfortable with either:

(1) Teak plywood as opposed to some of the "exotic" materials mentioned. I could make a plexi/acrylic window in it. Of course I would want to seal the edges as Jules suggested.

(2) Use the acrylic board I have. I have some teak stock that I could use to make some full length strips, so it fits the channel. Not sure what the best way to attach them to the acrylic is - definitely not Gorilla glue.

My boat is still inaccessible, but here's a photo of the companionway during renovation.nX7SQJzkTCmKexjeE1rQkQ_thumb_56e9.jpg.441721425b6a9ed40646d49985721cb5.jpg

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Bull - if you want to thicken the edges of an acrylic panel just to fit the guide channels, use acrylic of the correct thickness, not wood.

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Had new washboards from Acrylic made as the old plywood ones were looking tired...

Took the old ones to supplier and 3 hours later picked up new ones cut to size with edges flamed smooth. All I had to do was switch the fittings over.

Cost was not much more than I would have spent on paint!

Had a left over set of sign writing so thought why not stick on the washboards... 

BHAM3YaYTJelx2uhg54QYA.jpg

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On 5/31/2020 at 12:25 PM, SloopJonB said:

Bull - if you want to thicken the edges of an acrylic panel just to fit the guide channels, use acrylic of the correct thickness, not wood.

Jon, I assume glue would be used? What kind?

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There is special acrylic cement for plexiglass - some sort of model airplane glue I suspect since it is a solvent type glue.

I just had it done by a plastic shop.

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I prefer methylene chloride or MEK. If you're bonding using capillary wetting between two smooth, polished surfaces then just use them straight. If you've got rough surfaces or need to fill (very) thin gaps, dissolve the ground stuff in to increase viscosity. Don't over-clamp.

Wikipedia has a good table on solvent type versus plastic type. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solvent_bonding

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17 hours ago, IStream said:

I prefer methylene chloride or MEK. If you're bonding using capillary wetting between two smooth, polished surfaces then just use them straight. If you've got rough surfaces or need to fill (very) thin gaps, dissolve the ground stuff in to increase viscosity. Don't over-clamp.

Wikipedia has a good table on solvent type versus plastic type. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solvent_bonding

Yes, MEK is better, also less volatile, but somewhat harder to find.

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2 hours ago, Fleetwood said:

Yes, MEK is better, also less volatile, but somewhat harder to find.

Often sold for gluing plastics,  to make model railway buildings and the like. 

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5 hours ago, The Q said:
8 hours ago, Fleetwood said:

Yes, MEK is better, also less volatile, but somewhat harder to find.

Often sold for gluing plastics,  to make model railway buildings and the like. 

Here in the US you can find it by the quart at the local hardware store. As to whether that's a good or a bad thing, I'll reserve judgement.

As the The Q says, if you've got a local plastic fabrication shop they may sell you 50ml at a some exorbitant cost.

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15 hours ago, IStream said:

Here in the US you can find it by the quart at the local hardware store. As to whether that's a good or a bad thing, I'll reserve judgement.

As the The Q says, if you've got a local plastic fabrication shop they may sell you 50ml at a some exorbitant cost.

Generally not available here in Oz at local hardware stores, unless you want it tinted pink - PVC primer! Specialty paint, etc stores often have it.

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On 6/7/2020 at 5:45 PM, Fleetwood said:

Yes, MEK is better, also less volatile, but somewhat harder to find.

Just go to a fibreglass fabricator with an empty coffee jar.  That's what I did.

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On 5/29/2020 at 6:15 AM, Jules said:

There is sustainably grown teak available.

That's what they grow after they destroy the rain forest.

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14 hours ago, astro said:

That's what they grow after they destroy the rain forest.

Much 'sustainable teak' -- as opposed to 'teak from managed forests,' which might mean something, or it might mean 'We managed to smuggle this out of Borneo illegally and shot a few orangutans in the bargain" -- much 'sustainable teak' comes from plantations in Brazil and Costa Rica, where it was introduced in the 1930s and 40s. It tends to be less dense and less weather-resistant than East Asian teak, but it is notionally a more ethical product. 

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I have four washboards...

Basic teak plywood washboard that came original. It was pretty badly deteriorated, so I filled it, sanded it, and painted it with Brightside. One recoat in 14 years, still looks good.

1/2" Starboard washboard that I thought would be an improvement, but too heavy. It now works only as a filler for when the real washboard is being repainted.

1/4" bronze acrylic washboard that goes in when we're on the hook. Good light and visibility.

2-piece twinwall Lexan washboards that go in when we're on the dock somewhere. Very light, durable, lots of light, and total privacy.

 

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On 6/10/2020 at 3:36 AM, European Bloke said:

And I find stowing one set a PITA. What do you do, tow them behind in a dinghy each?

The plywood one has a home in the quarterberth, the acrylic one has a home in the v-berth, and the lexan boards are small and light enough to stash anywhere. The starboard one lives in my shop until it's needed.

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Did race to Hawaii four years ago, left the teak boards home, made plywood boards for the trip.  Back home, I leave the teak boards in the car, and have had two piece screens made for the islands trips.  

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  • 1 month later...

The finish on the current washboard is starting to chip, so with summer ending, I decided to get this project going. I ordered a 24" X 24" X ½" piece of teak plywood. It's not "marine" grade, but exterior grade. I've got some nice scraps from previous projects that will be plenty for an edge band - probably ¼" on the sides and ½" on the top and bottom edges. This will allow a ⅛" bevel for the slant. I'm planning to Titebond 3 for the edge band - no fasteners. My oldest son has a cabinet making business, so I have access to all kinds of tools and clamps.

The wood supplier does a lot of boat work, and they recommended applying a couple of coats of epoxy. @Jules recommended using WEST System 207 Special Clear Hardener, which I'm going to do.

A few "new to this stuff" questions:

1. Should I apply the epoxy to the raw wood, after wiping down with acetone?

2. What tools, and other things do I need for the epoxy bit? Brushes, rollers?

3. I use Cetol Natural Teak, without the gloss topcoat, on the other exterior teak. What should I use over the epoxy?

4. What am I missing?

Thanks.

B.C.

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1 hour ago, Bull City said:

A few "new to this stuff" questions:

1. Should I apply the epoxy to the raw wood, after wiping down with acetone?

2. What tools, and other things do I need for the epoxy bit? Brushes, rollers?

3. I use Cetol Natural Teak, without the gloss topcoat, on the other exterior teak. What should I use over the epoxy?

4. What am I missing?

  1. Epoxy can be laid over raw wood.  It will look the same as if you put on varnish. 
  2. With larger pieces, like plywood, rollers work best with epoxy.  Lay down very thin coats, about 3 should do.  West Systems makes rollers for this purpose. 
  3. Over the epoxy and marine varnish will work.  Just scuff it with 320, or whatever the manufacturer recommends. 
  4. You will have raw edges with the plywood.  You should seal that with a strip of solid wood.  If you can get teak, great.  If not maybe you can get a hold of mahogany.  You could do as thin as a veneer but I would recommend 1/2" or even 3/4" strips of solid wood.  Edges take a beating that veneer won't hold up well to over the long run.  I would also epoxy the edging on.  The raw wood edges are like sponges looking to ruin all your hard work. 
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2 hours ago, Jules said:

You will have raw edges with the plywood.  You should seal that with a strip of solid wood.  If you can get teak, great.  If not maybe you can get a hold of mahogany.  You could do as thin as a veneer but I would recommend 1/2" or even 3/4" strips of solid wood.  Edges take a beating that veneer won't hold up well to over the long run.  I would also epoxy the edging on.  The raw wood edges are like sponges looking to ruin all your hard work. 

I agree. See the beginning of the post:

3 hours ago, Bull City said:

I've got some nice scraps from previous projects that will be plenty for an edge band - probably ¼" on the sides and ½" on the top and bottom edges. This will allow a ⅛" bevel for the slant. I'm planning to Titebond 3 for the edge band - no fasteners. 

 

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I agree. 3 coats of epoxy, brush or roll. No sanding between coats if ~<24 hours between coats. Then 3 coats of varnish to protect the epoxy.

If you have epoxy, use it for the edge solid wood. Light clamping pressure only.

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On 5/28/2020 at 3:27 AM, SloopJonB said:

Tinted plexi.

make two pieces with the center cut angled so water runs off - the shingle effect.

 

On 5/31/2020 at 3:03 PM, Bull City said:

Use the acrylic board I have.

So I did remember right that you have a H-Boat.(looks nice!)
We have been using an acrylic board for... a decade or longer now and it works fine on our H-boat. Since you already have one cut to size I'd advise you to just use that to great effect.

The thickness issue is something I had to content with as well and simply glued on strips of acryl around the edges until the required thickness was achieved there. Using acrylic specific glue(usually UV hardened) is easy and bomb proof.(broke something beside the joint)

You can get such strips as cut off sometimes, cut your own from a sheet or buy something to fit from ebay or other online sellers for relatively small money.

Definitely the way to go as far as I am concerned.

Edit: And all of that has already been brought up... should have read the full thread first.

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The Bull has changed his mind... again.

After thinking about all the work (and $$$) involved in making a teak plywood washboard (precision carpentry in making edge bands, multiple coats of clear epoxy, varnish coats now and in the future) I became exhausted, and the plexi/lexi/acrylic washboard I have started looking pretty good.

So following @SloopJonB 's and @allweather 's advice, I decided to add some strips to add thickness to the edges. I hurried down to the local glass/plastic shop that cut it for me several years ago, and they have it in hand! They're going to cut and  glue in place four strips to bring it up to the right thickness.

One further question for y'all:

When I first made the plexi/lexi/acrylic washboard, the locking method was a tab on the sliding hatch that went through a slot near the top of the washboard, which was then secured with a padlock. When I moved to the plywood board, I started using a keyed barrel lock, which I now prefer. I'm going to need to fill the slot with something. Will epoxy work?

 

 

 

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Yep - tint it to match the acrylic. Tape off one side and pour it in the other side until level - or a bit proud if it is viscous enough to hold a meniscus

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1 minute ago, SloopJonB said:

Yep - tint it to match the acrylic. Tape off one side and pour it in the other side until level - or a bit proud if it is viscous enough to hold a meniscus

Thanks!

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I like 2 piece washboards, the lower one can be left in racing so broach water stays at bay, the dog stays inside during docking in ugly wind and it 'slows' rain when we have the hatch closed and bottom panel in. I just used tinted acrylic and where they meet there is a 2 " wide cross piece so they have a lap joint rather than a stepped joint, I just glued the cross piece on. 

Anybody notice with COVID and all the stores, restaurants , grocers putting up plastic panels the price of acrylic has gone to the moon?? Had to buy some 4x8 6mm clear and the cost last years was $180 cdn , this year $397 .....  must be the petroleum costs...... oh right oil is down..... 

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1 hour ago, crankcall said:

I like 2 piece washboards, the lower one can be left in racing so broach water stays at bay, the dog stays inside during docking in ugly wind and it 'slows' rain when we have the hatch closed and bottom panel in. I just used tinted acrylic and where they meet there is a 2 " wide cross piece so they have a lap joint rather than a stepped joint, I just glued the cross piece on. 

The one piece is not a problem for me to stow. If I got "broach water" where I sail (a lake), it would be an indication of something very serious.

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On 6/13/2020 at 9:53 AM, Ishmael said:

The plywood one has a home in the quarterberth, the acrylic one has a home in the v-berth, and the lexan boards are small and light enough to stash anywhere. The starboard one lives in my shop until it's needed.

I've got two as well. An Acrylic one and a plywood one that's 80% insect screen.

I carry a piece of sunbrella that matches my sail covers which fastens over the washboards so I can get my beauty sleep if it's too sunny or stern into a slip at a busy marina.

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On 8/17/2020 at 12:42 PM, crankcall said:

must be the petroleum costs...... oh right oil is down..... 

Off Topic:  There is a whole universe of feedstock chemicals that are used in ... basically everything. But they are only produced because they are by-products of fuel refining.  Every time there's an oil slump, stuff gets hard to buy because the raw materials are no longer available.  Similarly, when they phased out MTBE in the US, there was a whole slew of formerly cheap by-products that could no longer be had - processes had to be re-designed to use something else.  

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Making solid wood edging on plywood is relatively easy.  A simple 1/2" rabbit.  Makes the wear and tear easier and you can do final fit and shape on the solid wood edge. Probably the cheapest solution to keep with the style of the boat.

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2 hours ago, SASSAFRASS said:

Making solid wood edging on plywood is relatively easy.  A simple 1/2" rabbit.  Makes the wear and tear easier and you can do final fit and shape on the solid wood edge. Probably the cheapest solution to keep with the style of the boat.

Si, pero mucho trabajo.

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Teak is silly expensive.  There are other tropical hardwoods that are adequately durable and have similar appearance and much lower cost.
Garapa and Cumaru are a couple.  You could do your washboards for maybe $50. 

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On 8/17/2020 at 2:23 PM, Bull City said:

The Bull has changed his mind... again.

After thinking about all the work (and $$$) involved in making a teak plywood washboard (precision carpentry in making edge bands, multiple coats of clear epoxy, varnish coats now and in the future) I became exhausted, and the plexi/lexi/acrylic washboard I have started looking pretty good.

So following @SloopJonB 's and @allweather 's advice, I decided to add some strips to add thickness to the edges. I hurried down to the local glass/plastic shop that cut it for me several years ago, and they have it in hand! They're going to cut and  glue in place four strips to bring it up to the right thickness.

Picked up the wash board today with the added strips. Labor and materials were $64.00.

Teak plywood panel would have been $60 plus tax and shipping, clear epoxy & hardener another $30 or more, probably hundreds of dollars and vile cursing and swearing by the time it was finished resulting in many Acts of Contrition and several more post-mortem months in Purgatory. $64 was a bargain.

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It is warm and humid here in the UnSunny South. I did some touch up sanding on the new strips of plexi to take off the sharp edges, and stripped the old Cetol from the stiffeners. I put a coat of new Cetol on, and after five hours, it's still sticky. I hate this weather!!!  :angry:

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22 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Attachments won't open

 

Yup.  Sorry -- can't figure out how to post a picture anymore.  Tips?  Looked around but didn't immediately find anything, and with PhotoBucket having gone the way of the buffalo (at least for me) I no longer have a photo hosting site I use.  

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On 8/22/2020 at 6:04 PM, Plumbean said:

Late to the party, but here are mine.  Made these about 5 years ago from solid teak and they have been great.  There is an angled rabbet cut between the two boards to keep water out.  Slots are also angled.

I was able to open them - beautiful.

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Well, another day another disaster.  This spring I spent a week and refinished my companionway hatch boards by stripping them to raw teak and then putting 8 coats of allwood on them.

We had just the bottom board in place to keep the dogs in the cabin, and my son tripped and karate-kicked the board, splitting it almost clean in half.

After redoing them this last time, I swore I wouldn't be doing it ever again and if they failed I'd replace them with plastic. So, it's easy enough to cut lexan and starboard on a table saw.  But what's the right way to break the all the edges so there isn't anything sharp?  Router?  Seems like that would be tricky on the obtuse angle formed on the front upper edge of each board.

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I took a scraper(chisel or any strong metal edge will work) and just scraped the edges round. Gives a clean shaving with a little pressure. 

Sanding works in a pinch too but blinds the plastic unless you go through finer grids and/or polish. Scraping gets around that and makes less of a mess. 

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I just sanded all of mine (acrylic) with a few grits and a small block. Smooths the saw cuts and softens the edges.

Take it down to 320 or 400 then just wave a torch over the abraded surfaces and they come out looking as polished as the rest of the surfaces.

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(Minor thread hijack coming)

My Olson 25 has 4 wood washboards - with no lock or hasp or other way at the top to secure the lightweight sliding hatch against accidental opening in a storm, etc. Or against casual thieves. 
 

since I’m starting from zero, is there a “best practice” or ideal way to do this? 
 

-hinged hasp on the washboard, nub on the slider? (Less likely to hit head or snag sails on the nub than a dangly bit)?

-hasp in the middle or to one side (idea being to reduce chances of catching sails or scalps)?

-other more pleasing non-hasp options you know of?

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Did the O25 have a hole in the track for the sliding main hatch?  When pulled back / hatch closed the hole was exposed in front of the hatch and a lock can be inserted.  Thus prevents the hatch from sliding forward which allows removal of the wash boards.  Maybe that wasn't a thing on the O25 and I am confusing it with other Olsons.

I also seem to remember drilled holes in the track and upper washboard for inserting a pin to hold them in place when it was a washing machine outside.  The pin could be easily pushed out from down bellow or hatch slid open so you weren't trapped.

 

 

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2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

I just sanded all of mine (acrylic) with a few grits and a small block. Smooths the saw cuts and softens the edges.

Take it down to 320 or 400 then just wave a torch over the abraded surfaces and they come out looking as polished as the rest of the surfaces.

Interesting.  I think that's the way I'll do it.  Now the only debate - is the opening of a catalina 30 too wide for starboard (will it sag...)?  Wife doesn't want lexan because she doesn't really want people seeing inside.

I looked at G10 / FRP.  Having to paint it defeats the purpose.  The first time it's dropped the paint will be chipped.

I was looking around a faux teak but didn't see anywhere that sold  cut-able planks that actually looked like teak and were the proper width and didn't require any type of finish.  No interest in glueing things together.

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27 minutes ago, yoyo said:

Did the O25 have a hole in the track for the sliding main hatch?  When pulled back / hatch closed the hole was exposed in front of the hatch and a lock can be inserted.  Thus prevents the hatch from sliding forward which allows removal of the wash boards.  Maybe that wasn't a thing on the O25 and I am confusing it with other Olsons.

I also seem to remember drilled holes in the track and upper washboard for inserting a pin to hold them in place when it was a washing machine outside.  The pin could be easily pushed out from down bellow or hatch slid open so you weren't trapped.

 

 

Well that’s brilliant, why didn’t I notice that? Thanks!

57B88D15-91EF-4A57-A487-82917E2B2E9F.jpeg

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On 8/25/2020 at 11:03 AM, SloopJonB said:

I just sanded all of mine (acrylic) with a few grits and a small block. Smooths the saw cuts and softens the edges.

Take it down to 320 or 400 then just wave a torch over the abraded surfaces and they come out looking as polished as the rest of the surfaces.

sand to 120.....

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On 8/24/2020 at 9:25 PM, Bull City said:

I finished the Cetol application, and test fitted the board. Perfect fit. Now to install the lock!

Lock installed, companionway board installed, old board residing in garage with other pack rat items.

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On 8/25/2020 at 11:03 AM, SloopJonB said:

I just sanded all of mine (acrylic) with a few grits and a small block. Smooths the saw cuts and softens the edges.

Take it down to 320 or 400 then just wave a torch over the abraded surfaces and they come out looking as polished as the rest of the surfaces.

I cut sheets on the table saw and finish them with a hand plane.  A hand plane will give a factory-like finish to edges. 

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7 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

You're thinking of Lexan.

Lexan / polycarb being bulletproof, yeah I know.  The acrylic tends more toward shattering.  Unfortunately finding 1/2 polycarbonate in white is more challenging than I thought, which is why I'm just going with acrylic.

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