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Just an aside, I saved the old beat-up original (40 y old?) plywood when I made new hatchboards.  

I used that plywood to make one of little paper stacking trays for my desk.  I like to re-purpose old stuff from boats.  There are lots of memories in that old stuff.  

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Thank you so much for the kind words. It was many firsts for me (routing, teak work, acrylic work, fitment, seahood removal, epoxy fill and re-bed of the seahood screw holes, rubber work for the forward rubber stopper on the hatch, etc), I am surprised how clean everything worked out. Now to try my hand at varnishing (never done it before). TotalBoat clear gloss halcyon just arrived in the mail today. I bought it for the new tiller handle but methinks I should also apply it to the teak on the hatches to protect the time sink of this spring's work. Thought on the halcyon product? I wanted something closest to clear as I could get as I am not a fan of the darker/deeper varnish tones.

@Bugsy I painted the old washboards 2 years ago, so I would need to strip the paint off before repurposing it. There are memories in those boards for sure, but not _my_ memories. I think they will rock a shelf in my garage for the time being.

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9 hours ago, Swag Lady Skipper said:

Thank you so much for the kind words. It was many firsts for me (routing, teak work, acrylic work, fitment, seahood removal, epoxy fill and re-bed of the seahood screw holes, rubber work for the forward rubber stopper on the hatch, etc), I am surprised how clean everything worked out. Now to try my hand at varnishing (never done it before). TotalBoat clear gloss halcyon just arrived in the mail today. I bought it for the new tiller handle but methinks I should also apply it to the teak on the hatches to protect the time sink of this spring's work. Thought on the halcyon product? I wanted something closest to clear as I could get as I am not a fan of the darker/deeper varnish tones.

@Bugsy I painted the old washboards 2 years ago, so I would need to strip the paint off before repurposing it. There are memories in those boards for sure, but not _my_ memories. I think they will rock a shelf in my garage for the time being.

iMho teak could/should be left natural, no varnish. maybe just some tek oil...

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On 8/22/2020 at 6:04 PM, Plumbean said:

Late to the party, but here are mine.  Made these about 5 years ago from solid teak and they have been great.  There is an angled rabbet cut between the two boards to keep water out.  Slots are also angled.

 

 

IMG_6103.HEIC

IMG_2167.HEIC

Think I might have gotten these pics to load this time ...

IMG_6103.jpg

IMG_2167.jpg

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bloody heck Sloop now we got us 'nother lady to make us feel inferior ... :D

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1 hour ago, Trovão said:

iMho teak could/should be left natural, no varnish. maybe just some tek oil...

I am still considering leaving it bare. Though I read (in multiple places) that teak oil can stain gelcoat when it runs. Is this true?

If there is a way to not have to bother with varnish, I am all ears. All the brightwork is so...bright at the moment. Would be a shame to lose it. Convince me please, like pretty please. I got more important work to do on her than varnishing. Like sailing. :)

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2 hours ago, Mid said:

bloody heck Sloop now we got us 'nother lady to make us feel inferior ... :D

I get that a lot.

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19 minutes ago, Mid said:

:D But, do I have to? or rather, should I? 

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8 hours ago, Swag Lady Skipper said:

:D But, do I have to? or rather, should I? 

fear not , there actually are sections of SA that are both educational and humorous .

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Varnishing is both a religion and political.

I love the look of varnished teak but after decades of it I finally learned to leave it bare, scrubbed periodically so it's a nice whitish grey.

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Varnishing is both a religion and political.

I love the look of varnished teak but after decades of it I finally learned to leave it bare, scrubbed periodically so it's a nice whitish grey.

I am still valiantly slogging along with Cetol. Almost easy enough, almost long-lasting enough, almost attractive enough.

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Varnishing is both a religion and political.

I love the look of varnished teak but after decades of it I finally learned to leave it bare, scrubbed periodically so it's a nice whitish grey.

I too love the look but wish to dodge the decades long learning curve.

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45 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

I am still valiantly slogging along with Cetol. Almost easy enough, almost long-lasting enough, almost attractive enough.

I have seen mentions of Cetol but know little about it, academically or anecdotally. In your opinion, why Cetol?

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13 minutes ago, Swag Lady Skipper said:

I too love the look but wish to dodge the decades long learning curve.

The learning curve isn't that bad - although there's always something new.

It's the decades of work that grind you down.

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6 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

The learning curve isn't that bad - although there's always something new.

It's the decades of work that grind you down.

Lol, I was referencing the decades long learning curve to come to the conclusion that varnishing sucks and shouldn't be bothered with :P

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36 minutes ago, Swag Lady Skipper said:

I have seen mentions of Cetol but know little about it, academically or anecdotally. In your opinion, why Cetol?

The new formulations (Natural Teak) don't have the same horrible orange glow the original had, but it still hides the grain, and some colour variations. Working from bare wood, it's one coat a day for three days, with an optional gloss topcoat which gives you much longer service life. My neighbour gets 3 years with the topcoat, and he uses his boat hard as a liveaboard. Recoating is quite easy as well, and you can spot-fix patches.

I gave up on varnish on anything I can't keep covered.

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