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Good riddance!

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Cristoforo the fool who defiled the Tony Esposito DTS with his singular stupidity?

These two were pretty talented with Large exhibitions. The one in Central Park, NY was impressive. 

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“Art” has always escaped me. At least appreciation of the.......less traditional “art”. Winslow Homer.....yes......Remington.....yes......Matisse.......yes......even Warhol...........sorta yes........Christo......not so much. 
 

Guess I’m just an uncultured barbarian.........

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I visited the umbrella installation and thought it was pretty cool. Still have some literature on it that we got at a couple of the view sites. Mrs. Paca was in New York City when the “ Gates “ were up. 

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1 minute ago, SloopJonB said:

His first prominent work - the "fence" in NorCal was very cool - coming out of the fog.

image.png.a84b123709a2856e314846d1df676246.png

I believe that was called "The Running Wall"? or something like that. I actually ran along part of it. It was impressive in an unexpected/unusual kind of way but I'm not sure that makes art?

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We were in NYC when The Gates were up.  I have to admit they were pretty cool.  Simple, beautiful, effective. A heavy shock of color against the gray New York winter.  I had previously thought his stuff were primarily self-indulgent crocks, and though The Gates were certainly self-indulgent, they were not a crock.  They were gorgeous.  RIP.

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4 hours ago, Mrleft8 said:

Good riddance!

not unexpected from u.

u need to stay in pa with duh udder idiots

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3 hours ago, ovb said:

I guess I am a "uncultured barbarian " also....whenever I saw his stuff I thought what a waste of money...

It wasn't a waste of money, because it wasn't his money.

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27 minutes ago, VWAP said:

not unexpected from u.

u need to stay in pa with duh udder idiots

I don't like Frank Gehry either. Both pretentious boobs in my humble opinion.

 Art/craft doesn't need to appeal to everyone, but I would hope that artists/craftsmen/designers would make an effort not to intentionally offend the viewers.

 I know there was that whole "Fat and Fur" scene that did exactly that, but yanno..... It just isn't worth the creative effort if the only people who enjoy it, enjoy the fact that it makes others uncomfortable.

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I never understood Christo's work. Between its scale and its impermanence, it always offended me as wasteful even if it could be striking.

I like most of Frank Gehry's work and was excited when he was commissioned to do what's now called the Museum of Pop Culture here in Seattle. Unfortunately, it turned out to be one of, if not his very worst works.

 

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1 hour ago, IStream said:

I never understood Christo's work. Between its scale and its impermanence, it always offended me as wasteful even if it could be striking.

I like most of Frank Gehry's work and was excited when he was commissioned to do what's now called the Museum of Pop Culture here in Seattle. Unfortunately, it turned out to be one of, if not his very worst works.

 

I liked his work. And I liked it's scale and impermanence. And I always thought it was striking.

The best art always elicits strong emotions from its audience. Both  Positive and negative. Hell, people are still arguing about that painting of that plain looking woman with a weird smile on her face.

When Christo did a project, for a short while people quit talking about war and plague and Corruption and finance and partisan bullshit and talked about art instead. Just like we're doing now.

I like that. That's the cool part.

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3 hours ago, The Big D said:

I believe that was called "The Running Wall"? or something like that. I actually ran along part of it. It was impressive in an unexpected/unusual kind of way but I'm not sure that makes art?

What else would you call it? :D

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33 minutes ago, Dorado said:

I liked his work. And I liked it's scale and impermanence. And I always thought it was striking.

The best art always elicits strong emotions from its audience. Both  Positive and negative. Hell, people are still arguing about that painting of that plain looking woman with a weird smile on her face.

When Christo did a project, for a short while people quit talking about war and plague and Corruption and finance and partisan bullshit and talked about art instead. Just like we're doing now.

I like that. That's the cool part.

You actually get it. ;)

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I was living in Miami when he did his island skirt....made no sense to me other than look at me..look at me

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40 minutes ago, See Level said:

Maybe he was paid by the square foot..B)

 

I think cloth is sold by the yard.

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On 6/1/2020 at 1:38 PM, Caca Cabeza said:

It wasn't a waste of money, because it wasn't his money.

Actually, you're wrong there. He and his wife spent almost all their earnings to create the large works, relying very little on outside resources. That's why it often took years to get the permits and do the construction.

Now, was it Art? I don't know.

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On 6/1/2020 at 9:04 AM, bmiller said:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christo_and_Jeanne-Claude

The guy who wrapped stuff with shit.

He had his eye on the Arkansas river in our area but got shot down.


Ok I am disappointed in you slackers.

 

So any word about his funeral?    Thoughts from the peanut gallery?

 

Bubble wrap?

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On 6/1/2020 at 2:03 PM, Mrleft8 said:

 Art/craft doesn't need to appeal to everyone, but I would hope that artists/craftsmen/designers would make an effort not to intentionally offend the viewers.

And why not? A little provocation is often part of art. After all, you could say that art is the capacity to see the world in a different way, or to see what others do not see. At least, it should make you think of how you see the world.

When you see "The scream" by Munch for the first time, you cannot stay unaffected. It is not "pretty" or "beautiful" according to the cannons of beauty; but it does change you.

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