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Pic of your wooden dinghy sailing.


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One of two current projects:  Lake Skiff Sailing Association 14( also called an Ackroyd.). North American ancestor of the International 14.  Cool little boats, 140ft^2 gaff cat rig.   Needed a new deck, new bones and a few planks but I bought it anyway, because building (re building) is half the fun.  

SHC

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Not the one I used to part own, I was too busy sailing it to take pictures.  14ft They have a copper buoyancy tank and a steel plate . First built 1931, the Norfolk dinghy is a well supported class on the broads. 

The B on the sail is as in norfolk Broads. 

 

yandy218193.jpg

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From the days when Not Sinking was one of the accepted challenges of I 14 racing.  14s had used reefing gear, and there was a tradition that if the committee boat could hold station, the race was on.  

These are very much like the first 14s I ever saw at Buzzards Bay Bowls in the 1960s.

It is also remarkable how sensible and accessible these boats appear.  It’s hard to see the actual connection to the modern 14, even though we all know it is there.  I recall marveling at Glen Fosters mid boom sheeting and Proctor ballbearing traveler.  Stuart Walker had a boom with little jumper struts on the bottom to stiffen it.

SHC

 

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9 minutes ago, Steve Clark said:

From the days when Not Sinking was one of the accepted challenges of I 14 racing.  14s had used reefing gear, and there was a tradition that if the committee boat could hold station, the race was on.  

These are very much like the first 14s I ever saw at Buzzards Bay Bowls in the 1960s.

It is also remarkable how sensible and accessible these boats appear.  It’s hard to see the actual connection to the modern 14, even though we all know it is there.  I recall marveling at Glen Fosters mid boom sheeting and Proctor ballbearing traveler.  Stuart Walker had a boom with little jumper struts on the bottom to stiffen it.

SHC

 

Those boom shrouds sound like they could give you a shave during a tack.  

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You can make any shape out of wood.  Do a little research on construction methods and some nautical history.  Most fiberglass boats up until recently came out of molds that were developed from wood plugs.  A good example of a shapely wood hull would be a 12 Meter from the late 60's.... all kinds of curves there.   A good book to check out if you're interested in learning about some of these methods would be this: https://www.westsystem.com/the-gougeon-brothers-on-boat-construction/   You'll find a link there to the entire book free in PDF format.  

 

To answer your question though, that boat was strip planked with an interesting cored wood product.  I think the core is balsa, and there is some type of tropical hardwood veneer on wither side of the balsa.  The material was cut into roughly 1" strips and then those strips were edge glued to each other around a mold.  The inter and outer skins were then fiberglassed and that was vacuum bagged to the planking.  

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1 hour ago, Admiral Hornblower said:

What was the building method used? I did't know such a shaply hull could be made out of wood.

The Contender was originally designed for mostly plywood construction with radiused chines. 

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4 hours ago, Ned said:

The Contender was originally designed for mostly plywood construction with radiused chines. 

May have been, though the above boat was built as described.  I believe the Bonezzi boats are cold molded.

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17 hours ago, Ned said:

The Contender was originally designed for mostly plywood construction with radiused chines. 

The radiused chines involved more than just plywood though. The kit I bought in 1970 included several redwood or cedar strips to build up the area & then plane to shape.

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5 hours ago, Doug Halsey said:

The radiused chines involved more than just plywood though. The kit I bought in 1970 included several redwood or cedar strips to build up the area & then plane to shape.

You will notice I didn't include actual instructions for building the boat.  

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  • 8 months later...

A woody I built 28 years ago which was donated back to me which I then upgraded to be completely competitive with the glass boats which I built later. The sailing photos are from last weekend.

45DFAEFA-486E-40DE-876B-B2828208F754.jpeg

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22C6A2BA-CD1C-4ACB-BA61-814F3E74FB8B.jpeg

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10 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

Dang

I see a spot where you could put a few more control lines, why leave any of it blank?

;)

FB- Doug

Unfortunately the sideways movement of the jib cars means no controls on the outer 150mm of the thwart.

And I know what you said was tongue in cheek!!

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6 hours ago, Major Tom said:

A woody I built 28 years ago which was donated back to me which I then upgraded to be completely competitive with the glass boats which I built later. The sailing photos are from last weekend.

45DFAEFA-486E-40DE-876B-B2828208F754.jpeg

5AAFC3D4-C012-4085-9758-3294FE29EB06.jpeg

9CD92266-562E-47E6-986D-24BACC1B6628.jpeg

C873A3FF-1985-47A1-834C-522F60D66BBF.jpeg

4C314259-7322-485F-83FB-B24F75AFD6FD.jpeg

22C6A2BA-CD1C-4ACB-BA61-814F3E74FB8B.jpeg

That is awesome! I wish we had boats like that in the US.

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47 minutes ago, fastyacht said:

50419592587_7601ecd401_o.jpg

Looks like a Beetle Cat... maybe smaller

 

1 minute ago, Admiral Hornblower said:

That is awesome! I wish we had boats like that in the US.

Yep, I dunno why  we did not develop some of the cool one-designs other countries have.

FB- Doug

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59 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

Looks like a Beetle Cat... maybe smaller

 

Yep, I dunno why  we did not develop some of the cool one-designs other countries have.

FB- Doug

That's a Mystic Seaport Beetle Cat. Actually it is an IRYS beetle on loan to Mystic this year because of COVID19 they couldn't get all their boats caulked and ready. But they *did* commit to having a full livery anyway. Three hurrahs for the Seaport last year.

As for dinghies. Yeah, what happened? Maybe all the light wind...or if you listen to Frank B, it was fiberglass. Hahaha....

Homegrown lightweight U.S. wooden dinghies: Duster, Windmill, Moth come to mind of course...and canoe but she is special

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40 minutes ago, fastyacht said:

That's a Mystic Seaport Beetle Cat. Actually it is an IRYS beetle on loan to Mystic this year because of COVID19 they couldn't get all their boats caulked and ready. But they *did* commit to having a full livery anyway. Three hurrahs for the Seaport last year.

As for dinghies. Yeah, what happened? Maybe all the light wind...or if you listen to Frank B, it was fiberglass. Hahaha....

Homegrown lightweight U.S. wooden dinghies: Duster, Windmill, Moth come to mind of course...and canoe but she is special

I think it was the damn teetotallers. Only partly joking.

We had sailing lighters in the ports, and of course speed was desired because time is money. These boats evolved into sandbaggers, and there were variants from Boston to the Delaware... dunno why the Chesapeake and further south didn't have any. The North Carolina sounds had sharpie-like boats but if they were raced for money (and it seems likely they were) it never became profitable enough to build specialized boats just for that.

Racing sandbaggers was a regular business. Betting on them was almost as popular as betting on horse races. At one point it was a more popular sport than baseball. But of course drinking was involved. The temperance movement targeted places where drinking and gambling took place, and shut down a heck of a lot.... horse racing moved out of the cities into the boondocks to get away from Carrie Nation's hatchet. Sandbaggers were no longer profitable and disappeared; in all seriousness the temperance movement was not totally at fault but they sure didn't help.

So there are really no examples of the kinds of boats that developed into the Aussie 18, here. We started all over again with much less promising types.

except for E-scows, but that's another story......

FB- Doug

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17 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

I think it was the damn teetotallers. Only partly joking.

We had sailing lighters in the ports, and of course speed was desired because time is money. These boats evolved into sandbaggers, and there were variants from Boston to the Delaware... dunno why the Chesapeake and further south didn't have any. The North Carolina sounds had sharpie-like boats but if they were raced for money (and it seems likely they were) it never became profitable enough to build specialized boats just for that.

Racing sandbaggers was a regular business. Betting on them was almost as popular as betting on horse races. At one point it was a more popular sport than baseball. But of course drinking was involved. The temperance movement targeted places where drinking and gambling took place, and shut down a heck of a lot.... horse racing moved out of the cities into the boondocks to get away from Carrie Nation's hatchet. Sandbaggers were no longer profitable and disappeared; in all seriousness the temperance movement was not totally at fault but they sure didn't help.

So there are really no examples of the kinds of boats that developed into the Aussie 18, here. We started all over again with much less promising types.

except for E-scows, but that's another story......

FB- Doug

You left out the Corinthian movement and hatred of black people. That also figures prominently into the death of the sandbagger.

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20 minutes ago, fastyacht said:

You left out the Corinthian movement and hatred of black people. That also figures prominently into the death of the sandbagger.

That would be worth hearing about, too.

Apologies for the thread hijack

FB- Doug

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4 hours ago, fastyacht said:

What are these? Cool.

It is an Extra sailing dinghy, designed about 60 years ago as a development class with, if a remember correctly, 5 measurement stations controlling rocker, panel curvature, chine widths and heights and sheer width. They used to have aluminium foils but we got that rule changed about 25 years ago as the pointing performance of the boat was really poor compared to Lasers and most other boats, which made it a nightmare to sail in mixed fleets. You can see on the floor around the case that a new case was dropped in with a ply capping all round. This shape is my interpretation of the rules which I did 28 years ago, it basically is now a one design class based on these measurements .

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10 hours ago, fastyacht said:

That's a Mystic Seaport Beetle Cat. Actually it is an IRYS beetle on loan to Mystic this year because of COVID19 they couldn't get all their boats caulked and ready. But they *did* commit to having a full livery anyway. Three hurrahs for the Seaport last year.

As for dinghies. Yeah, what happened? Maybe all the light wind...or if you listen to Frank B, it was fiberglass. Hahaha....

Homegrown lightweight U.S. wooden dinghies: Duster, Windmill, Moth come to mind of course...and canoe but she is special

you forgot the Fireball! how could you!

8320e27d157c620dcd0adba0eaea72c7.thumb.jpg.4db73b469b6f387140eee0fe5b844dd2.jpg

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Ok, so it's not all wood, but this is what I had...

Perros 06-04a.jpg

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My International 14 #437 as it currently exists.  The plan is to make he pretty again unless somebody else wants the project and wants to take it off my hands.

I14_01.thumb.jpg.93526c18c387e4074c86a52dfe564fdf.jpg

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The Snipe South Europeans will take place here in Vigo in August, it's also the 80th anniversary of Spain's first Snipe fleet (ours) so a bunch of us started restoring some old wooden snipes to hold a "classics" regatta at the same time, we expect a good number of them from all over Spain and Portugal. 

Astilleros Lagos here in Vigo started building snipes in 1941 and they stopped making them in the nineties after building more than 1.000 of them.

This is the one I'm restoring (obviously that's not her sail number):

IMG-20190921-WA0007.thumb.jpg.d4a89cacde318ef094c49e93f266daaa.jpgIMG-20210214-WA0000.thumb.jpeg.3f10dd99326187e33358f03ff062c0a2.jpeg

I was planning on opening a thread later on to invite everyone to join us in Vigo but I guess this is a good place to do it ;-)

 

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Francis Seavy's Snipe "Honey" is a stunning example of a varnished wooden craft. Currently it is in a sailing museum in St. Petersburg, Florida, alongside an original Pram and Windmill. Old picture that I'll have to find and scan.

Dave Ellis

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To Fastyacht's point.  At the end of the 19th century the world of sport was very different than it is today.  In England there was a strict differentiation between Corinthian sport and Professional sort.  There are many reasons for this and you see it showing up all over the place, not least of which in the Modern Olympic movement which was strictly not professional until the 1970s.  A famous case was that of Jack Kelly Sr, who was one of the outstanding oarsmen of his era, but was excluded from competing in the Royal Henley because he was employed as a brick layer.  After he moved to Philadelphia and made a pile in construction, he founded and funded Vesper Boat Club and made sure his son ( Jack Kelly Jr) won Henley and his daughter ( Grace Kelly) married into the royal family of Monaco.  He sent the Stewards of Henley his flat cap when Jack won, and Vesper Crews proudly wore "Kelly for Brickwork" on their jerseys when over seas.

The English, can be very snooty and dismissive of whatever they feel isn't up to their standards. The colonies, particularly America and Australia were always reacting to these snubs and acting like a kid who hates his daddy but desperately craves his approval.  New York society didn't respond as we would hope they might.  Instead of telling the Brits to bugger off,  they aspired to be even more snooty than they were.  As a result there was an division in the sport between those who thought yachting should be conducted in "sound, sensible, seaworthy vessels" and those who were unafraid to get wet if it meant getting paid.  There was a spirited debate in the pages of Field and Stream ( W.P. Stephens) and Rudder ( Thomas Flemming Day.)  Unfortunately the wrong side won, and the professional water men were told that their participation was not welcome. The sport evolved differently in North America as a result.  Sailing is ex-urban leisure activity of the privileged,  and it is very hard to change.

SHC

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Historic and socioeconomic context to sailing/yachting and how that continues to manifests itself in our modern day cultural treatment and perception of sailing in our different regions is pretty fascinating. Thanks, Steve.

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On 3/4/2021 at 3:34 PM, chuso007 said:

The Snipe South Europeans will take place here in Vigo in August, it's also the 80th anniversary of Spain's first Snipe fleet (ours) so a bunch of us started restoring some old wooden snipes to hold a "classics" regatta at the same time, we expect a good number of them from all over Spain and Portugal. 

Astilleros Lagos here in Vigo started building snipes in 1941 and they stopped making them in the nineties after building more than 1.000 of them.

This is the one I'm restoring (obviously that's not her sail number):

IMG-20190921-WA0007.thumb.jpg.d4a89cacde318ef094c49e93f266daaa.jpg

 

So who was holding the boat and who was taking the trolley back up the beach? Clowns.

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On 3/3/2021 at 10:32 PM, Steam Flyer said:

That would be worth hearing about, too.

Apologies for the thread hijack

FB- Doug

The Biglin Brothers Turning the Stake. Philadelphia, 19th century, wood boat, not amateurs...back when longshoremen raced sandbaggers, sloop-boats etc and there were also tuckups and hikers out racing with fleet totals on weekends in the Delaware with 500 boats....

the_biglins.thumb.png.501311bccd3e6ce3d09162612874866d.png


...from this level of activity both amateur and professional came the Kellys. 

People were way more physically active in 1905. Walk from West Philadelphia or North Philadelphia to work at 17th and Arch, walk out past the Water Works in the afternoon, grab some shells and row upriver to the upriver boathouse, and back down. Sunday outings in a wherry with the women and children, again to the upriver boathouse.

And bicycle touring was also huge in that time. And track racing. Culminating with 6 day races,  miss and out, the Madison, and lots of others. Like sailing, there were originally people from lots of not effete backgrounds racing. 

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On 3/3/2021 at 8:42 PM, Major Tom said:

A woody I built 28 years ago which was donated back to me which I then upgraded to be completely competitive with the glass boats which I built later. The sailing photos are from last weekend.

45DFAEFA-486E-40DE-876B-B2828208F754.jpeg

 

 

 

 

 

 

That's a cool renovation and upgrade.

Congrats with on winning the Provincials with it.

Regards.

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20 hours ago, European Bloke said:

So who was holding the boat and who was taking the trolley back up the beach? Clowns.

Sorry, what?

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18 hours ago, fastyacht said:

The Biglin Brothers Turning the Stake. Philadelphia, 19th century, wood boat, not amateurs...back when longshoremen raced sandbaggers, sloop-boats etc and there were also tuckups and hikers out racing with fleet totals on weekends in the Delaware with 500 boats....

the_biglins.thumb.png.501311bccd3e6ce3d09162612874866d.png


...from this level of activity both amateur and professional came the Kellys. 

People were way more physically active in 1905. Walk from West Philadelphia or North Philadelphia to work at 17th and Arch, walk out past the Water Works in the afternoon, grab some shells and row upriver to the upriver boathouse, and back down. Sunday outings in a wherry with the women and children, again to the upriver boathouse.

And bicycle touring was also huge in that time. And track racing. Culminating with 6 day races,  miss and out, the Madison, and lots of others. Like sailing, there were originally people from lots of not effete backgrounds racing. 

Here’s the link to the boat you requested.

I have to sent it separately from this post for some reason.

106E142B-DCE1-435A-915E-0F18DA489A26.png

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I was also a coxswain on a varsity 8 racing out of Vespers in the early to mid 80’s. I remember seeing Jack Kelly jogging around all the time. He died doing what he loved. My Mom was from the Main Line and was often mistaken for Grace Kelly.
 

The crew went to Henley but my parents were too poor so I stayed stateside. They finished 2nd.  Not bad for some Yanks!

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48 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

I was also a coxswain on a varsity 8 racing out of Vespers in the early to mid 80’s. I remember seeing Jack Kelly jogging around all the time. He died doing what he loved. My Mom was from the Main Line and was often mistaken for Grace Kelly.
 

The crew went to Henley but my parents were too poor so I stayed stateside. They finished 2nd.  Not bad for some Yanks!

This is an extremely small world.

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  • 2 weeks later...

My Uffa Fox designed Albacore, and not shown I also have an Ackroyd like Steve Clark is restoring. Both are great boats that demonstrate the advances in hull form design and sail plans for their respective entries into the market. 

image.jpeg

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On 3/6/2021 at 8:43 AM, Steve Clark said:

To Fastyacht's point.  At the end of the 19th century the world of sport was very different than it is today.  In England there was a strict differentiation between Corinthian sport and Professional sort.  There are many reasons for this and you see it showing up all over the place, not least of which in the Modern Olympic movement which was strictly not professional until the 1970s.  A famous case was that of Jack Kelly Sr, who was one of the outstanding oarsmen of his era, but was excluded from competing in the Royal Henley because he was employed as a brick layer.  After he moved to Philadelphia and made a pile in construction, he founded and funded Vesper Boat Club and made sure his son ( Jack Kelly Jr) won Henley and his daughter ( Grace Kelly) married into the royal family of Monaco.  He sent the Stewards of Henley his flat cap when Jack won, and Vesper Crews proudly wore "Kelly for Brickwork" on their jerseys when over seas.

The English, can be very snooty and dismissive of whatever they feel isn't up to their standards. The colonies, particularly America and Australia were always reacting to these snubs and acting like a kid who hates his daddy but desperately craves his approval.  New York society didn't respond as we would hope they might.  Instead of telling the Brits to bugger off,  they aspired to be even more snooty than they were.  As a result there was an division in the sport between those who thought yachting should be conducted in "sound, sensible, seaworthy vessels" and those who were unafraid to get wet if it meant getting paid.  There was a spirited debate in the pages of Field and Stream ( W.P. Stephens) and Rudder ( Thomas Flemming Day.)  Unfortunately the wrong side won, and the professional water men were told that their participation was not welcome. The sport evolved differently in North America as a result.  Sailing is ex-urban leisure activity of the privileged,  and it is very hard to change.

SHC

Intersting history Steve, and it explains a lot of why US is different to other big sailing countries.

In Australia the workng boats morphed into the skiff classes, 10, 12, 16, and 18s in the eastern states and 14s spread more widely. Between the wars we already had many local classes and at least Moths and VJs spread nation wide. Then post war came the home build revolution from designers like Charlie Cunningham in Melbourne and Jack Holt from the UK. In the 1950,  suburban people had time and a little money and with a few skills and simple tools created thousands of plywood sailing sdinghies and catamarans. That was the boom era for small clubs, many survive but now days the increase cost for quality boats from factories, plus longer working hours, smaller suburban home plots and sheds, and the sport is shrinking.

Meanwhile the big boat clubs became more egalitarian just like our society. But still today there is little mixing of Yacht (Balasted boats) and Sailing (dinghy/cats) clubs. Mostly for logistic rather than social reasons.

Hope someone can sumarize the UK version, I expect there will be similarities, especially the impact of jack Holt.

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In the UK Jack Holt, Jack Chippendale  and others, in particular the Mirror newspaper which sponsored the Mirror Dinghy had a huge effect in the 1960s .

One of the problems now, is schools now rarely teach practical skills, woodwork  / Metal work / technical drawing / cookery / Domestic Studies all got subsumed into a catch all Craft design  and technology, which includes basic computer science. So they learn a little about a lot.. Useless for building a boat.

So kids coming out of school rarely have practical skills and don't go on to build a cheap boat.. They will only buy a boat if they can afford it..

Also, for instance, Norfolk council got rid of the schools sailing fleet , partly to save costs, partly because it was seen as elitist.

I think we have more mixed clubs in the UK, In particular in Norfolk. My own club ranges from 45ft Broads sailing cruisers down to  oppies. In the middle and very popular on the broads are keelboats of 20-25ft most clubs have fleets of them . Sometimes we can have them all on one stretch of river.. 

https://www.horning-sailing.club/webcams/

See the source image

Note in the UK, generally, a "Keelboat" as a term refers to open , fixed keel displacement boat, If it's got a cabin it's a yacht or a sailing cruiser.

My club has:

Rebels. https://www.classicboat.co.uk/rebel-reiver-r16/

White Boats , http://www.ybod.org.uk/

Reedling Keelboats, https://www.yachtsandyachting.com/news/172559/Reedling-Keelboats-50th-Anniversary-Celebrations

Yeoman, http://www.yeomankinsman.org.uk/yeoman/yeoman.shtm

Some old classes such as the Norfolk dinghy http://www.norfolkdinghy.com/ still have the requirement, the helm must be an owner.

Going to say Royal Windermere Yacht club, https://www.royal-windermere.co.uk/ (founded 1860) and you can't get more posh than a "Royal"

They have to have a huge variation from yachts / sailing cruisers  through the popular Keel boats such as Flying 15s, to the common Dinghys.

To encourage more into sailing my club started a sailing school, 80 kids out there most Thursday evenings in the summer. Many leave when they no longer qualify to use a club boat.. But those that get enthusiastic do get their own boats and our fleets have been increasing for some years.

 

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On 3/5/2021 at 9:27 PM, fastyacht said:

The Biglin Brothers Turning the Stake. Philadelphia, 19th century, wood boat, not amateurs...back when longshoremen raced sandbaggers, sloop-boats etc and there were also tuckups and hikers out racing with fleet totals on weekends in the Delaware with 500 boats....

the_biglins.thumb.png.501311bccd3e6ce3d09162612874866d.png


...from this level of activity both amateur and professional came the Kellys. 

People were way more physically active in 1905. Walk from West Philadelphia or North Philadelphia to work at 17th and Arch, walk out past the Water Works in the afternoon, grab some shells and row upriver to the upriver boathouse, and back down. Sunday outings in a wherry with the women and children, again to the upriver boathouse.

And bicycle touring was also huge in that time. And track racing. Culminating with 6 day races,  miss and out, the Madison, and lots of others. Like sailing, there were originally people from lots of not effete backgrounds racing. 

Was there ever a better painter than Eakins?   

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 International 14 "Lorelei" from 1939. Built off the "Alarm" lines of Uffa Fox. Still has the original miter cut cotton Ratsey sails.

She doesn't sail these days much but still takes podium at the Wooden Boat Shows.

IMG_2582.thumb.JPG.4a59e104486444143702a9958850f4a6.JPGIMG_2555(1).thumb.JPG.e94f9ca83449e648db30fba05912457a.JPGthumbnail_IMG_1559.jpg.0aa00e6e03bdef204c4480c464f2c5b8.jpg

thumbnail_IMG_3951.jpg

62203623_10214348118999172_4200610631193198592_n.jpg

thumbnail_IMG_1554.jpg

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On 3/3/2021 at 7:42 PM, Major Tom said:

A woody I built 28 years ago which was donated back to me which I then upgraded to be completely competitive with the glass boats which I built later. The sailing photos are from last weekend.

45DFAEFA-486E-40DE-876B-B2828208F754.jpeg

5AAFC3D4-C012-4085-9758-3294FE29EB06.jpeg

9CD92266-562E-47E6-986D-24BACC1B6628.jpeg

C873A3FF-1985-47A1-834C-522F60D66BBF.jpeg

4C314259-7322-485F-83FB-B24F75AFD6FD.jpeg

22C6A2BA-CD1C-4ACB-BA61-814F3E74FB8B.jpeg

What boat is that? Do you have a photo which shows the sailplan?

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Similar to @F_Maffe above, I also designed and built this little skiff but never got to sail her. I moved away before it got rigged :(

IMG_0834.thumb.JPG.b06073de64fa653566ac17436854fe1e.JPG

photo3.jpg.9dc4c9e7b23850b1a256de1f98f1dffd.jpg

 

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5 hours ago, F_Maffe said:

What boat is that? Do you have a photo which shows the sailplan?

It is an ‘Extra’ sailing dinghy.

3.68m long(12 foot), Hull and board 55kg fitted.

5D50926E-2772-4F1A-B360-A020AD0AE6ED.jpeg

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8 hours ago, Major Tom said:

It is an ‘Extra’ sailing dinghy.

3.68m long(12 foot), Hull and board 55kg fitted.

5D50926E-2772-4F1A-B360-A020AD0AE6ED.jpeg

8.5 sq/m sail area, planes upwind in low mode, happily does 16 knots offwind in a breeze, but is a nightmare to sail in big chop and breeze due to short overall length and a rather wide bow section constrained by class rules. 

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On 3/22/2021 at 8:01 PM, Sail4beer said:

Not as fast as the Stars, but not a slouch!

That whole scene is giving me pangs of nostalgia for New Jersey. There, I said it. :-D But let's see, probably isn't in NJ haha.

 

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Here is my 18 footer. Please don't give me a hard time about the sail trim. That picture was taken about five minutes after the boat was launched for the first time and there were a number of things not quite right. 

IMG_1890.jpg

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5 hours ago, Quilbilly said:

Here is my 18 footer. Please don't give me a hard time about the sail trim. That picture was taken about five minutes after the boat was launched for the first time and there were a number of things not quite right. 

 

Nice! What's the design?

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6 hours ago, Quilbilly said:

Here is my 18 footer. Please don't give me a hard time about the sail trim. That picture was taken about five minutes after the boat was launched for the first time and there were a number of things not quite right. 

IMG_1890.jpg

The sail trim looks fine. I'd recommend a bit more outhaul tension on the main, though...

;)

Great looking boat! Serious congrats!

FB- Doug

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7 hours ago, Quilbilly said:

Here is my 18 footer. Please don't give me a hard time about the sail trim. That picture was taken about five minutes after the boat was launched for the first time and there were a number of things not quite right. 

 

Wait, What? NO hard time? When you are pointing it out?  OMG!  Did you buy that mainsail at the Michelin store?

 

 

 

Only kidding. Not. OK only in fun.   Nice boat! Looks like the San Francisco Bird Boat would have looked like if it had been meant to look really sweet.

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3 hours ago, Alan Crawford said:

Nice! What's the design?

It is my design which is based on a 1930s Monk design full keel sloop I restored in the 1970s. . The new one weighs about a quarter as much and has a modern underbody. 

 

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51 minutes ago, Quilbilly said:

It is my design which is based on a 1930s Monk design full keel sloop I restored in the 1970s. . The new one weighs about a quarter as much and has a modern underbody. 

 

EVEN BETTER!   Damn! I LIKE IT!

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