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Laser 2 Cruising Mods & trip report


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So, just returned from my inaugural Laser 2 camping trip, 4 nights in the Slate Islands on Lake Superior, in my new to me Laser 2. Currently running white sails only, single paddle for propulsion, and no trapeze. 

20200625_162130.thumb.jpg.a5c94f9832e8907f197cb3d6d548b197.jpg

First afternoon heading out, there was crazy fog, had okay wind for about 2 miles and then it died down to this nutty fog, so cold that the forward side of my lines was covered in frost, and dead calm. I'd try to paddle out of it with the boom hitting me in the head every time I shifted my weight or got any forward momentum, and once in a while break into a clear patch, sun, and a little wind. I'd get sailing only to plunge into another fog bank so thick that I couldn't tell which direction the sun was shining from and had a hard time steering a straight course in, especially with my one paddle propulsion setup. 

So, wondering if there's a more balanced, efficient way to move the L2 when there's no wind. I was considering a rowing setup, and there's a local guy with oarlocks and very nice spoon blade 8' laminated pine oars for $300 CAD asking, but I have no idea how to store those, I'm fairly sure they're longer than the cockpit. The other idea is a two piece sculling oar that would split to sit in the cockpit, but I'm not sure where one could be mounted, and I've heard they're slower than oars by a good amount. I'm guessing it would have to be offset from the centerline? 

Either way, I'm a little iffy on the gunwale mounted setups I've seen, because I want to start using the trapeze solo, and those get in the way!

Also, is there a way to rig up a brailing line of some kind to get the boom out of the way for rowing, paddling, whatever? I think a line just to the spin pole ring and around the boom would do the trick but it would leave the sail to flap still and I'm not sure if that would be too much weight up high?

Third day out I had strong west wind, heading from sunday harbor west and then downwind east and a broad reach north to the northeastern most island in the group, Delaute. Wind built steadily from 10 to 15 to 20, gusting a bit, and man was the downwind bit and the first reaching incredible. By the time I started heading north the sailing was just ridiculous, even with all the vang, downhaul, and out haul I could put on, on, I was screaming, and getting so overpowered in the gusts that I was bearing away as far downwind as I could to ease pressure, sheets of white water spray getting kicked up by the bow everytime I hit a wavetop. Definitely the craziest, most amazing run I've had in a long time. After reaching into the strait between the islands and superior's north shore, the waves were (it seemed) reaching 5 feet every once in a while, and so I ducked into a little, rocky, but very well sheltered cove for the night where the picture I posted was taken. 

So, definitely like to figure out solo trapeze so that I can keep a bit more control in situations like that, and not have to be luffing 3/4 of the main and jib. Any suggestions or tips? I've never been in a trapeze before! I'm assuming I need a tiller extension extension but I'm not sure if that's going to affect tacking/jibing? Are adjustable/extendable tillers a thing?

I've also got to fix my bailer as it let in a steady trickle of water even when closed, which ended up being a little dangerous. That first crossing with the icy fog, my wetsuit setup ended up being just barely adequate to prevent hypothermia, and I had a fire going before even unpacking on my first beach. Like to keep a little more water out of the boat next time, i know there will always be a bit from the daggerboard but this was a good 2 inches at the back of the boat. 

 

Anyhow, all this talk is just because I'd like some input, on the whole the adventure was incredible, and I love Lake Superior. Hoping to do a longer trip from Sleeping Giant east along the shore later this summer maybe? Until then, local sailing!

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Great post!  I'm afraid I have no useful input on your Laser II for rowing or trapeze, but I am impressed at your camping.   I have camped a bunch out here on the West Coast of CA with my regular Laser and it is so meaningful and intense to go solo with the gear you need and be self-sufficient.     I've only sailed Lake Superior in Keelboats (in the 70's) and know how there is often no wind and then too much wind!

Cheers,

Dennis

Laser Campload 06.jpg

Laser Crossing 06.jpg

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Laser 2, much underated boat.

Moving it. Check this link http://www.collars.co.uk/info/49/recent_articles/32/the_yuloh_sculling_oar

I've always wanted to try one.

Trapeze. I occasionally use an L2 single handed from the trapeze. Sheet from the boom. This gives enough space to swing longer extension forward for racks and gybes

L2 sails well with main only from trapeze. Roll jib around forestay, lift dagger boat 10". Sheet boom over transom corner, main sheet take off from rope traveller should be in the middle. Loose leach helps.

Boom. Tie thin rope to spreader on one side, lead down to boom, underneath boom (about 2ft from end) screw on a small fairlead, and back upto small block on other spreader and then down to a cleat, you could use the spinnaker pole lift cleats. This can be used to lift the boom and will contain the main a bit when you lower it.

I got rid of the wire halyards and those nasty racks. Replaced them with 5mm dyneema and clam cleats (two in series on the jib)

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20 hours ago, Dart96 said:

Laser 2, much underated boat.

Moving it. Check this link http://www.collars.co.uk/info/49/recent_articles/32/the_yuloh_sculling_oar

I've always wanted to try one.

Trapeze. I occasionally use an L2 single handed from the trapeze. Sheet from the boom. This gives enough space to swing longer extension forward for racks and gybes

L2 sails well with main only from trapeze. Roll jib around forestay, lift dagger boat 10". Sheet boom over transom corner, main sheet take off from rope traveller should be in the middle. Loose leach helps.

Boom. Tie thin rope to spreader on one side, lead down to boom, underneath boom (about 2ft from end) screw on a small fairlead, and back upto small block on other spreader and then down to a cleat, you could use the spinnaker pole lift cleats. This can be used to lift the boom and will contain the main a bit when you lower it.

I got rid of the wire halyards and those nasty racks. Replaced them with 5mm dyneema and clam cleats (two in series on the jib)

Minus build quality, the laser 2 is amazing.

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Camping California on a laser, that's pretty awesome! Love your pictures

 

And thank you for the sailing tips. I was tempted to change out the halyards too, but I'm planning on selling it after this summer (heading west to liveaboard again), so not much point. They are brutal on the hands though 

 

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3 hours ago, European Bloke said:

Don't get rid of those wire racks. Replace the wire with D12 with a loop in. Then you don't have to worry about stupid cleats slipping. Check for damage to the current system that will eat the D12.

 

19 minutes ago, Dart96 said:

Dyneema needs 5x dia bend radius to keep 80% of strength, so I took the racks off.

My jib is actually just the bead type on a wire halted that gets cranked into a bit of metal at the top of the mast, and my main is just one rack, not the version with options. You just crank on the Cunningham if you need to. 

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I don't know if it will work on a Laser ll but when I had my 470 I'd stand on the bow deck facing the stern, holding the mast and rock the boat with my legs.  The boat went through the water way faster than I ever could have paddled.  If I needed to turn I'd just rock harder in one direction than the other. 

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On 7/4/2020 at 2:50 AM, Vaeredil said:

So, just returned from my inaugural Laser 2 camping trip, 4 nights in the Slate Islands on Lake Superior, in my new to me Laser 2. Currently running white sails only, single paddle for propulsion, and no trapeze. 

20200625_162130.thumb.jpg.a5c94f9832e8907f197cb3d6d548b197.jpg

First afternoon heading out, there was crazy fog, had okay wind for about 2 miles and then it died down to this nutty fog, so cold that the forward side of my lines was covered in frost, and dead calm. I'd try to paddle out of it with the boom hitting me in the head every time I shifted my weight or got any forward momentum, and once in a while break into a clear patch, sun, and a little wind. I'd get sailing only to plunge into another fog bank so thick that I couldn't tell which direction the sun was shining from and had a hard time steering a straight course in, especially with my one paddle propulsion setup. 

So, wondering if there's a more balanced, efficient way to move the L2 when there's no wind. I was considering a rowing setup, and there's a local guy with oarlocks and very nice spoon blade 8' laminated pine oars for $300 CAD asking, but I have no idea how to store those, I'm fairly sure they're longer than the cockpit. The other idea is a two piece sculling oar that would split to sit in the cockpit, but I'm not sure where one could be mounted, and I've heard they're slower than oars by a good amount. I'm guessing it would have to be offset from the centerline? 

Either way, I'm a little iffy on the gunwale mounted setups I've seen, because I want to start using the trapeze solo, and those get in the way!

Also, is there a way to rig up a brailing line of some kind to get the boom out of the way for rowing, paddling, whatever? I think a line just to the spin pole ring and around the boom would do the trick but it would leave the sail to flap still and I'm not sure if that would be too much weight up high?

Third day out I had strong west wind, heading from sunday harbor west and then downwind east and a broad reach north to the northeastern most island in the group, Delaute. Wind built steadily from 10 to 15 to 20, gusting a bit, and man was the downwind bit and the first reaching incredible. By the time I started heading north the sailing was just ridiculous, even with all the vang, downhaul, and out haul I could put on, on, I was screaming, and getting so overpowered in the gusts that I was bearing away as far downwind as I could to ease pressure, sheets of white water spray getting kicked up by the bow everytime I hit a wavetop. Definitely the craziest, most amazing run I've had in a long time. After reaching into the strait between the islands and superior's north shore, the waves were (it seemed) reaching 5 feet every once in a while, and so I ducked into a little, rocky, but very well sheltered cove for the night where the picture I posted was taken. 

So, definitely like to figure out solo trapeze so that I can keep a bit more control in situations like that, and not have to be luffing 3/4 of the main and jib. Any suggestions or tips? I've never been in a trapeze before! I'm assuming I need a tiller extension extension but I'm not sure if that's going to affect tacking/jibing? Are adjustable/extendable tillers a thing?

I've also got to fix my bailer as it let in a steady trickle of water even when closed, which ended up being a little dangerous. That first crossing with the icy fog, my wetsuit setup ended up being just barely adequate to prevent hypothermia, and I had a fire going before even unpacking on my first beach. Like to keep a little more water out of the boat next time, i know there will always be a bit from the daggerboard but this was a good 2 inches at the back of the boat. 

 

Anyhow, all this talk is just because I'd like some input, on the whole the adventure was incredible, and I love Lake Superior. Hoping to do a longer trip from Sleeping Giant east along the shore later this summer maybe? Until then, local sailing!

I have way to many boats right now so don't take this as Buyer interest... but... do you mind saying how much you paid for it?

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6 minutes ago, JBOATTROUBLEMAKER said:

I have way to many boats right now so don't take this as Buyer interest... but... do you mind saying how much you paid for it?

Not at all, paid $2000 canadian for it. Not sure if I overpayed or not but I've already got my money's worth of fun out of it I think, it's all uphill from here. 

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7 minutes ago, Vaeredil said:

Not at all, paid $2000 canadian for it. Not sure if I overpayed or not but I've already got my money's worth of fun out of it I think, it's all uphill from here. 

People seem to be torn on the Laser II. Some people love them, others think that they belong in the back of the boneyard. I am in the first camp...

As for the price, I sold a decent laser II (white sails, blue hull) for $650 with a trailer a few years ago, then again, maybe yours is in better shape (mine was missing the spin pole).

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7 minutes ago, JBOATTROUBLEMAKER said:

People seem to be torn on the Laser II. Some people love them, others think that they belong in the back of the boneyard. I am in the first camp...

As for the price, I sold a decent laser II (white sails, blue hull) for $650 with a trailer a few years ago, then again, maybe yours is in better shape (mine was missing the spin pole).

I've been loving mine so far, but then again they're aren't any modern racing dinghys in my neck of the woods, so it's pretty much the best I could do for speed and capability. $650 (USD?) with a trailer sounds like a darn good deal, even sans spinnaker pole, though.

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2 minutes ago, Vaeredil said:

I've been loving mine so far, but then again they're aren't any modern racing dinghys in my neck of the woods, so it's pretty much the best I could do for speed and capability. $650 (USD?) with a trailer sounds like a darn good deal, even sans spinnaker pole, though.

It also had a minor soft spot around the inspection port on the stern...

Believe me, here in the Northeast US, the only reasonably priced boats are not modern... Unless you want to pay 6k for a 20 year old c420.

I ended up buying a JY15 turbo instead...now I regret it.

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