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There are a number of "memorable moments" over those 37 years...hard to say "scariest". Probably the scariest for me in the 37 years was a structure fire with a trapped woman that I was the commander

Say I didn’t know Point Break was taking his pre meds for the Colonoscopy in Beirut, somebody actually captured the moment the NucoLax kicked in!

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3 hours ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

has there ever been an explosion in the middle east in the last century or two that was really an accident?

asking for a friend ...

I know that was tongue in cheek, but just for shits and giggles google "Camp Doha 1991".   No vids that I know of but it was on a par with this one. 

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3 hours ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

has there ever been an explosion in the middle east in the last century or two that was really an accident?

asking for a friend ...

Never attribute to malice what can be explained by stupidity.

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3 minutes ago, Tax Man said:

Never attribute to malice what can be explained by stupidity.

sometimes a fine line ...

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I heard on the news today:

2700 tons were stored since 2014.

WTF, since 2014, you could not sell it or use it for farming???

Something does not sound right.

Sounds like someone wanted to make a bomb like the Oklahoma City bombing.

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2 minutes ago, Meat Wad said:

I heard on the news today:

2700 tons were stored since 2014.

WTF, since 2014, you could not sell it or use it for farming???

Something does not sound right.

Sounds like someone wanted to make a bomb like the Oklahoma City bombing.

An overloaded truck carries 30 ton.  It would take 100 trucks to deliver that bomb. I am relly thinking this is a hugely unfurtunate civil fuck up.

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30 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

just an idea on how big that crater is

untitled.jpg

I guess the earth really did move...

The pale colored stuff to the left is presumably grain from the destroyed silos.  Not going to make much bread from that now.

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

And no-one will be held responsible.

Heard a long interview on BBC with the Director of the Port.  Heads are going to roll, maybe his.  What I hadn't heard is that a judge ruling on the lawsuits between the shipping company and the importers and exporters of the fertilizer directed the stuff to be warehoused there. 

Apparently, the judge wouldn't give relief to ship it or store it elsewhere as it was the major collateral in the lawsuit.   The port guy, when asked bluntly by the interviewer, reluctantly said that they hadn't sought to relocate the fertilizer because the "law" had ruled.  

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14 minutes ago, hobot said:

d29ceb7.jpg

My shotfirer's ticket is decades out of date, but we used to use nitroprill for ANFO charges because it was - duh - prilled to better absorb diesel. IIRC the fertiliser grade AN wasn't and in fact had a coating on it that made it far less susceptible to soaking up fuels etc.

So.... if my memory of ancient times is correct and nothing has changed WRT AN formulations, those sacks are for making explosives not fertiliser, though I'm sure nitroprill would work as fertiliser. I think it was a lot more hygroscopic though which wasn't a good thing.

FKT

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“Nitroprill HD” is a knock-off product of the trademarked Nitropril, a premium grade porous prilled ammonium nitrate manufactured and sold by the Orica Mining Services in Australia. It is used as a commercial explosive in mining and quarrying. The safety sheet of the original product says it “May explode under confinement and high temperature, but not readily detonated. May explode due to nearby detonations.” An Orica safety assessment (App III) sets the TNT (military explosive) equivalence for fire of bulk Nitropril in big bags at 15%. 2,750 tons of Nitropril are thereby the equivalent of 412.5 tons of TNT.

 

https://niqnaq.wordpress.com/2020/08/05/the-smoky-fire-that-preceded-the-fireworks-must-have-been-accidental/

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So a powder monkey(explosives certified) mate said that Ammonium Nitrate will just fizzle in a fire - probably the 1st fire, what it takes to explode with such force would be the addition of the right amount of diesel within a minute percentage to make it primed (within a 12hr window) & render it effective as an explosive plus the right ignition which would have to be a high explosive charge. Given that each bag of that was in storage would mean they would each need the exact specific mix.

I call Bullshit it was a munitions storage (the fireworks was small arms rounds going off) with a really BIG bomb (or multiple) that was destined for some place & that probably arrived not long ago. 

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19 minutes ago, AWASP said:

 

I call Bullshit it was a munitions storage 

because storing thousands of pounds of munitions in a silo in the main port of beirut is more likely than the fact that your mate is wrong?

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30 minutes ago, AWASP said:

So a powder monkey(explosives certified) mate said that Ammonium Nitrate will just fizzle in a fire

And he'd be quite correct for small amounts.

When you get to the multi-tonne level, all bets are off. We *KNOW* it can explode because there are a lot of cases in the past where it has.

Our standard practice for blowing stumps and the like was a half stick of gelignite, ANFO poured on top to fill the hole, then another half stick on top, hooked together with PETN detonating cord then a detonator and safety fuse. Takes a fair shock wave to get ANFO to detonate in small amounts, not so in bulk.

FKT

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1 hour ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

And he'd be quite correct for small amounts.

When you get to the multi-tonne level, all bets are off. We *KNOW* it can explode because there are a lot of cases in the past where it has.

Our standard practice for blowing stumps and the like was a half stick of gelignite, ANFO poured on top to fill the hole, then another half stick on top, hooked together with PETN detonating cord then a detonator and safety fuse. Takes a fair shock wave to get ANFO to detonate in small amounts, not so in bulk.

FKT

Thanks FKT, I am by no means an expert hence quoting a "mate" it just sounded quite probable ???

@Mr Clean I don't believe I said it was stored in the silo but perhaps implied in a stoage facility, hence the massive hole in the bay in front of the Silo's, just saying ??

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13 minutes ago, AWASP said:

Thanks FKT, I am by no means an expert hence quoting a "mate" it just sounded quite probable ???

@Mr Clean I don't believe I said it was stored in the silo but perhaps implied in a stoage facility, hence the massive hole in the bay in front of the Silo's, just saying ??

Get your mate to read this article and see what he says.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texas_City_disaster

FKT

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13 hours ago, Mark K said:

.Holy crap, what a disgrace in port management and judicial /political farting around.   Any competent country/region should have had an emergency declaration and judicial sale or disposal back in friggin 2013.  

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34 minutes ago, nolatom said:

.Holy crap, what a disgrace in port management and judicial /political farting around.   Any competent country/region should have had an emergency declaration and judicial sale or disposal back in friggin 2013.  

Ummm Yea, It's fucking Beruit.....

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8 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

My shotfirer's ticket is decades out of date, but we used to use nitroprill for ANFO charges because it was - duh - prilled to better absorb diesel. IIRC the fertiliser grade AN wasn't and in fact had a coating on it that made it far less susceptible to soaking up fuels etc.

So.... if my memory of ancient times is correct and nothing has changed WRT AN formulations, those sacks are for making explosives not fertiliser, though I'm sure nitroprill would work as fertiliser. I think it was a lot more hygroscopic though which wasn't a good thing.

FKT

I don't know how ammonium nitrate fertilizer is stored, but those super sacks are used for everything from brewer's malt to industrial chemicals.

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10 hours ago, warbird said:

An overloaded truck carries 30 ton.  It would take 100 trucks to deliver that bomb. I am relly thinking this is a hugely unfurtunate civil fuck up.

interesting though is that Putin's name is in the story of how that product ended up in Beirut in a warehouse

CNN reports it was a Russian ship that had the product on board destined for somewhere else and stopped in Beirut to theoretically get some more cargo to make the trip not lose money. Crew eventually jumped ship due to no dough.

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32 minutes ago, Chris in Santa Cruz, CA said:

interesting though is that Putin's name is in the story of how that product ended up in Beirut in a warehouse

CNN reports it was a Russian ship that had the product on board destined for somewhere else and stopped in Beirut to theoretically get some more cargo to make the trip not lose money. Crew eventually jumped ship due to no dough.

Let's see....... I think I will ship my restored1938 S&S Yawl as deck cargo above 3000 tons of explosives:lol:

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Talk about needless risk.  It looks like welders working on a door that started the fire, which in turn caused the explosion. This from a maritime website, gCaptain:

"Lebanese broadcaster LBCI reported that the Rhosus had been scheduled to sail with its cargo from Beirut six years ago but stayed at the port due to a mechanical failure. Workers welding a door on Tuesday started a fire that ignited the chemicals, LBCI said, citing people who attended a Supreme Council of Defense briefing after the blast. "

Hotwork anywhere near ammonium nitrate is both stupid and suicidal.  Human nature being what it is, they evidently minimized the risk since it had been what, 6 years and no problemo??  It even had a name, the "nitrate locker", said some.  No one should have a "nitrate locker", at least not like this.

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As I recall.......two ways to get an explosion from ammonium nitrate. 1) with a “primer charge” of sufficient size as a shock/detonator and 2) confined space and heat. The video showing prior fire and minor explosions leads me to #1, unlike Texas City which was #2. 

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We heard some rumor about a container with fireworks?  Wonder if the "door" they were cutting or welding, was a door for that container?  Or more likely part of the wharf shed.  Whichever way, it looks like a clown show at all levels of industry and administration, with a terrible result.

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I don’t get how the explosion ignited as if it was one mass when in fact the AN was in separate sacks...

I get that it all would eventually rapidly explode but not in one massive explosion 

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9 minutes ago, BravoBravo said:

I don’t get how the explosion ignited as if it was one mass when in fact the AN was in separate sacks...

The shockwave when the first bag goes up travels at over 3,000 m/s.  That would travel the full length of the warehouse in less than one frame - looks instant.

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10 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

 I'm sure nitroprill would work as fertiliser.

AFAIK that's what it's for.

It was what we spread on the apple orchard when I was a kid.

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4 minutes ago, MR.CLEAN said:

that looks real

It certainly does. I'm not sure how that "artifact" could have been inserted into a video, but perhaps there are arcane techie ways to do it.

The plot thickens.

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9 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

It certainly does. I'm not sure how that "artifact" could have been inserted into a video, but perhaps there are arcane techie ways to do it.

The plot thickens.

lol i hope you're not that gullible.  some here are.

"USE THE MAGIC NEGATIVE FILTER"

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2 minutes ago, MR.CLEAN said:

lol i hope you're not that gullible.  some here are.

"USE THE MAGIC NEGATIVE FILTER"

I always come here for the truth 

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54 minutes ago, Point Break said:

As I recall.......two ways to get an explosion from ammonium nitrate. 1) with a “primer charge” of sufficient size as a shock/detonator and 2) confined space and heat. The video showing prior fire and minor explosions leads me to #1, unlike Texas City which was #2. 

 

37 minutes ago, BravoBravo said:

I don’t get how the explosion ignited as if it was one mass when in fact the AN was in separate sacks...

I get that it all would eventually rapidly explode but not in one massive explosion 

It all depends on how it was stored for the long period of time. I've seen piles of wood ships in a pile for an extended period catch fire on their own. nature generated head on decomposition. Explosions have happened in silos without any human influence.

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16 minutes ago, Meat Wad said:

 Explosions have happened in silos without any human influence.

We had a grain elevator explosion here back in the 70's - not remotely on that scale but whooda thunk grain dust could spontaneously blow a concrete silo apart?

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2 minutes ago, MR.CLEAN said:

Can you get them to use that MAGIC NEGATIVE FILTER on those UFO videos?

I am disappointed I never spotted a UFO in all those offshore miles 

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2 minutes ago, Mr. Squirrel said:

I stumbled across this on Google today.  I think it is more plausible than the missile.

MS

AcmeBeirut.jpg

Bhwawawawa... love the sign 

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

We had a grain elevator explosion here back in the 70's - not remotely on that scale but whooda thunk grain dust could spontaneously blow a concrete silo apart?

Well, fire codes and building codes sure do think that.  They have for years, with much experience to back them up.  Flour or grain dust is one of the most common explosive substances, right up there with gunpowder.  Designed in blast walls or ceilings designed to give way and direct explosions away from people and preserve exiting from the structure.  

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59 minutes ago, Mr. Squirrel said:

I stumbled across this on Google today.  I think it is more plausible than the missile.

MS

AcmeBeirut.jpg

Especially since the fake missile looks like a fuckin' Soyuz. :rolleyes:

How stunned would you have to be?

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3 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

Well, fire codes and building codes sure do think that.  They have for years, with much experience to back them up.  Flour or grain dust is one of the most common explosive substances, right up there with gunpowder.  Designed in blast walls or ceilings designed to give way and direct explosions away from people and preserve exiting from the structure.  

Now he tells me.  ;)

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1 hour ago, P_Wop said:

No, I would need a metric shed-load more solid evidence before going down that path.

Your metric shed load of "solid evidence" is presented to you in post #146.  Literally a metric shed load.  

(Ignoring for a moment the "ACME FERTILIZER COMPANY" sign so nicely photoshopped. :)  )

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1 hour ago, Meat Wad said:

 

It all depends on how it was stored for the long period of time. I've seen piles of wood ships in a pile for an extended period catch fire on their own. nature generated head on decomposition. Explosions have happened in silos without any human influence.

Oh man, wish I had a dollar (okay, maybe 100 dollars :D) for every pile of wood chips on fire I’ve been to. That’s why the fire code specified maximum height/depth etc each pile can be. They are supposed to be turned over periodically as well to prevent the spontaneous ignition. They don’t. Those things takes hours and hours to put out. You gotta bring in a fixer or at least a skip loader to pull the pile apart to put it out........PIA!!!!

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2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

We had a grain elevator explosion here back in the 70's - not remotely on that scale but whooda thunk grain dust could spontaneously blow a concrete silo apart?

Me.  My dad owned a feed mill, and I had friends who were farmers growing up -- this was always a concern with grain bins.  High School science teacher used to do a great demo with a steel paint can, a small bowl of flour and a candle.  He had soldered on a 1/4" piece of copper tubing through a hole in the side of the can that pointed down to where you would set the bowl of flour.  Place bowl, light candle, tab on lid, blow through tube *BOOM* lid blew right off the can.

The farm kids got it.

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23 minutes ago, bplipschitz said:

Me.  My dad owned a feed mill, and I had friends who were farmers growing up -- this was always a concern with grain bins.  High School science teacher used to do a great demo with a steel paint can, a small bowl of flour and a candle.  He had soldered on a 1/4" piece of copper tubing through a hole in the side of the can that pointed down to where you would set the bowl of flour.  Place bowl, light candle, tab on lid, blow through tube *BOOM* lid blew right off the can.

The farm kids got it.

We don't have any grain silo's out our way, but firefighting literature is filled with stories and caution for grain silo explosions. I always think.........no thanks........

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1 hour ago, Point Break said:

Oh man, wish I had a dollar (okay, maybe 100 dollars :D) for every pile of wood chips on fire I’ve been to. That’s why the fire code specified maximum height/depth etc each pile can be. They are supposed to be turned over periodically as well to prevent the spontaneous ignition. They don’t. Those things takes hours and hours to put out. You gotta bring in a fixer or at least a skip loader to pull the pile apart to put it out........PIA!!!!

How about a really  large pile of old tires?

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25 minutes ago, VWAP said:

How about a really  large pile of old tires?

Worse.............way worse..........way way worse. Had just one of those...............fortunately we got it out pretty early in the development and it was a small pile we could pull apart. Sometimes those go a long long time. 

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3 hours ago, P_Wop said:

Here are some overhead views of the port, before and after.  Move the slider across the image to see the comparison.

Interesting to see that the blast capsized a good-sized ferry at the other end of the dock.

https://www.euronews.com/2020/08/06/before-and-after-photos-from-beirut-s-port-reveal-scale-of-disaster

12 warehouses not including the blown up one, gone...  two ships next to the crater, not a sign..     but the question remains , why was there a satellite taking a picture of beirut right before the blast? 

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3 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

12 warehouses not including the blown up one, gone...  two ships next to the crater, not a sign..     but the question remains , why was there a satellite taking a picture of beirut right before the blast? 

Regular sat pass?

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1 hour ago, Point Break said:

Worse.............way worse..........way way worse. Had just one of those...............fortunately we got it out pretty early in the development and it was a small pile we could pull apart. Sometimes those go a long long time. 

Quote

After 2 decades, Pa. tire fire cleanup ending

URYEA (AP) - Years of cleanup are finally coming to an end in northeastern Pennsylvania where more than 100,000 tires once burned.

A fire in Duryea was intentionally set over two decades ago

The blaze took 800 firefighters and a private contractor three days to contain.

 

 

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5 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

12 warehouses not including the blown up one, gone...  two ships next to the crater, not a sign..     but the question remains , why was there a satellite taking a picture of beirut right before the blast? 

 

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1 hour ago, Point Break said:

Regular sat pass?

Quote

A SkySat spacecraft, operated by San Francisco-based company Planet, captured detailed imagery of the port of Beirut both before and after the blast

Each SkySat satellite is equipped with a Ritchey-Chretien Cassegrain telescope with a focal length of 3.6 m, and a focal plane consisting of three 5.5 Mpixel CMOS imaging detectors. SkySat-1 and -2 use 3 CMOS frame detectors with a size of 2560 × 2160 pixels and a pixel size of 6.5 µm. The operational satellites have a higher resolution detector. The upper half of the detector is used for panchromatic capture, the lower half is divided into 4 stripes covered with blue, green, red and near infra-red color filters. The native resolution at nadir of the SkySat-1 and SkySat C is around 1.1 m. Further satellites will be placed in lower orbits, leading to increased image resolution.

some high resolution shit.. 

SkySat is owned by  Skybox, wonder if this is the same Skybox?

Quote

Skybox Security was cofounded in 2002 by Eran Reshef[1] and Gidi Cohen,[2] who serves as the company's CEO.[3] The company is headquartered in San Jose, California and R&D offices in Herzliya Israel. The company also runs the Skybox Research Lab,[16] a security intelligence arm that aggregates intelligence from public and private sources,

 

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4 hours ago, BravoBravo said:

I don’t get how the explosion ignited as if it was one mass when in fact the AN was in separate sacks...

I get that it all would eventually rapidly explode but not in one massive explosion 

One possible scenario:

Small explosion sends lots of dust into the air, static electricity caused by the dust in the air sets off a secondary explosion.

Even flour can explode like this.

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2 hours ago, Point Break said:

Oh man, wish I had a dollar (okay, maybe 100 dollars :D) for every pile of wood chips on fire I’ve been to. That’s why the fire code specified maximum height/depth etc each pile can be. They are supposed to be turned over periodically as well to prevent the spontaneous ignition. They don’t. Those things takes hours and hours to put out. You gotta bring in a fixer or at least a skip loader to pull the pile apart to put it out........PIA!!!!

At one time I was doing surface restoration for a 100 year old gravel pit. Lots of steep banks to close to the property line so I took in anything for fill. trees, stumps, leaves, branches. Pack it down with a D6, spread some sand over it and add more. Cover it all with overburden.  Three years later the smoke started seeping out one sink hole area. It smoked slowly for 4 or 5 years.:D

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1 hour ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

some high resolution shit.. 

SkySat is owned by  Skybox, wonder if this is the same Skybox?

 

not the same Skybox,   Skybox was sold to Planet, from a startup that was aquired by google and then sold by google..    still pretty coincidental that happen to be imaging that spot beforehand..

 

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18 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

12 warehouses not including the blown up one, gone...  two ships next to the crater, not a sign..     but the question remains , why was there a satellite taking a picture of beirut right before the blast? 

Uhm...What are the odds that the DoD or the CIA or NSA would be interested in having a satellite over Beirut?  Slim to none?  50% of the time? or geo-synchronous?

Frankly, if an Imam anywhere in the Mid East decided to light a fart, they'd probably pick it up.

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55 minutes ago, warbird said:

At one time I was doing surface restoration for a 100 year old gravel pit. Lots of steep banks to close to the property line so I took in anything for fill. trees, stumps, leaves, branches. Pack it down with a D6, spread some sand over it and add more. Cover it all with overburden.  Three years later the smoke started seeping out one sink hole area. It smoked slowly for 4 or 5 years.:D

Quote

Darvaz: The Door to Hell

This place in Uzbekistan is called by locals “The Door to Hell”. It is situated near the small town of Darvaz. The story of this place lasts already for 35 years. Once the geologists were drilling for gas. Then suddenly during the drilling they have found an underground cavern, it was so big that all the drilling site with all the equipment and camps got deep deep under the ground. None dared to go down there because the cavern was filled with gas. So they ignited it so that no poisonous gas could come out of the hole, and since then, it’s burning, already for 35 years without any pause. Nobody knows how many tons of excellent gas has been burned for all those years but it just seems to be infinite there.

and it's been burning for 49 years.

 

1.jpg

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56 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

Uhm...What are the odds that the DoD or the CIA or NSA would be interested in having a satellite over Beirut?  Slim to none?  50% of the time? or geo-synchronous?

Frankly, if an Imam anywhere in the Mid East decided to light a fart, they'd probably pick it up.

unless someone was going to do something about a munitions factory..

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FIREFIGHTER DOWN: We are saddened to learn that Sahar Faris, 25, has been named as the first firefighter, confirmed to have died in the line of duty, whilst attending the fire in the port of Beirut, the Lebanon, and was caught in the resulting massive explosion.
Sahar a firefighter / paramedic, who was engaged to be married nexy year, was part of a team of ten firefighters based at La Quarantaine fire station, in northeastern Beirut who were mobilised as the first crews to the initial fire.
Tragically whilst attempting to deal with the fire all ten were caught in the massive explosion, caused by the ignition of a large quantity of ammonium nitrate.
Her nine colleagues remain unaccounted for at this time.
Our thoughts and prayers go to her family, friends and colleagues and to those of the other unaccounted for firefighters.
Firefighter Sahar Faris, La Quarantaine fire station, Stand Down your duty is done.

 

117287808_3518370668187760_3567337474115576634_n.jpg

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6 hours ago, Point Break said:

We don't have any grain silo's out our way, but firefighting literature is filled with stories and caution for grain silo explosions. I always think.........no thanks........

Electrical codes dealing with it too are interesting. 

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5 minutes ago, dyslexic dog said:

Electrical codes dealing with it too are interesting. 

I have little to no knowledge of that body of code requirements. Given the magnitude of the result of “mistakes” I bet they are comprehensive!

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WRT flour self-igniting, I did some photography in a Robin Hood flour mill quite a few years ago. All the equipment was made from wood and they were all driven by leather belts from one giant wheel. They told me they didn't allow anything in there that could spark. It was beautiful, and fascinating. They were very serious about fire safety.

The "elevator" between floors was a small (like a foot square) platform attached to a continuously moving endless belt. Step on, ride up or down, step off. The safety inspectors must have gone off their nut about that system.

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24 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

The "elevator" between floors was a small (like a foot square) platform attached to a continuously moving endless belt. Step on, ride up or down, step off. The safety inspectors must have gone off their nut about that system.

Also known as a Paternoster.  They still exist in some buildings.

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1 hour ago, bplipschitz said:

Also known as a Paternoster.  They still exist in some buildings.

do you call a FireTruck or Plumber when Stuck in 1foot opening Up or Down ??

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3 hours ago, Priscilla said:

Tough business especially when you have two major economic drivers which could stack up to mess the whole thing up, price of aluminium and the price of electricity. Guess Rio Tonto either doesn't hedge with those commodities or the prices went out of the range.

I think there is a large geothermal powered smelter in Iceland which is why I thought about the fiery hole.

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