Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Newport-12s-1024x650.jpg

I’ve been trying to sort through some boxes of old 35mm transparencies and came on this photo that I took at Newport RI in 1970 - half a century ago! It must have been during the NYYC selection trials for the America’s Cup defense against the Australian challenger Gretel II. - An Anarchist.
 
So, dear anarchists, which two 12's are these?
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, surfsailor said:

Intrepid and Valiant.

Looks right to me. Just a few years later, my office was on the second floor of the building at the far right. Valiant was  a big sucker.

The railways went the way of all flesh a few years later, too.

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Editor said:
Newport-12s-1024x650.jpg

I’ve been trying to sort through some boxes of old 35mm transparencies and came on this photo that I took at Newport RI in 1970 - half a century ago! It must have been during the NYYC selection trials for the America’s Cup defense against the Australian challenger Gretel II. - An Anarchist.
 
So, dear anarchists, which two 12's are these?

Ahh back in the days when you used anti fouling on your AC ride..

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, Stingray~ said:

From an AC guru friend:

 

”They are US 20 CONSTELLATION and US 24 VALIANT.”

Unless Constellation got a major chop job - and I'm pretty sure it didn't - that's the Brit Chance modified Intrepid. Constellation had a full keel.

6366c46d9eed02b4d2a29413e6c23926.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Stingray~ said:

“20 has an aftermarket “kicker” added by the Frogs.”

Don't remember that, but there was a lot of modding of old 12s to use as trial horses in those days. Having said that, it sure looks like Intrepid to me - starting with the long run in front of the rudder.  Did Constellation ever have a cove stripe?

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, surfsailor said:

Unless Constellation got a major chop job - and I'm pretty sure it didn't - that's the Brit Chance modified Intrepid. Constellation had a full keel.

6366c46d9eed02b4d2a29413e6c23926.jpg

It looks like Intrepid with the Chance mods: big fat bustle compared to the 1967 stern. To the best of my knowledge, Constellation never had a skeg-mounted separate rudder.

Link to post
Share on other sites

In the 1969 book Defending the America's Cup Bob McCullough writes they put an Intrepid style "kicker" on Constellation.  There is also a picture in the book of a kicker on Columbia.  I think that is Intrepid in the FP photo, Constellation and Columbia didn't have a cove stripes.

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Wheezer said:

Intrepid was almost cut in two at Driscolls in San Diego,,, was not successful in the next trials.

Intrepid came within a broken runner block in the last race of the defender trials of being the only three-time defender in 1974. It depends on how you define "successful", I guess.

The bustle mods on Intrepid in 1970 were made by screwing and gluing pine to the outside of the existing hull planking. This was faired in using epoxy and microballoons. Paul Coble oversaw most of that, as well as the original construction of the boat at Minnefords.

When Intrepid was launched, she had a canvas over the deck draped over big drums where the grinding pedestals would normally have been. This was to disguise the fact that the grinders were actually below deck, driving the winch drums  via what was similar to a bicycle chain arrangement, with handles in place of pedals.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, accnick said:

Intrepid came within a broken runner block in the last race of the defender trials of being the only three-time defender in 1974. It depends on how you define "successful", I guess.

Hahaha - you beat me to that one. My understanding is Driscoll put her back to her original lines, plus they had a great sail program.

'Not successful' would be a better descriptor for Mariner. In her defense, Mariner was a pretty boat after the 'butt reconstruction' with her chine and bright red paint.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, surfsailor said:

Hahaha - you beat me to that one. My understanding is Driscoll put her back to her original lines, plus they had a great sail program.

'Not successful' would be a better descriptor for Mariner. In her defense, Mariner was a pretty boat after the 'butt reconstruction' with her chine and bright red paint.

"Even a turd is pointed at both ends"  ---Ted Turner, about Mariner's chopped-off bustle

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, accnick said:

"Even a turd is pointed at both ends"  ---Ted Turner, about Mariner's chopped-off bustle

Butch Ulmer had some trenchant commentary that made Ted Turner sound like a choirboy. But in the water, Mariner looked like a properly vicious race machine, as did Salty Goose - as a kid aspiring to be a yacht designer, those Derecktor boats were mind blowing.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/18/2020 at 1:24 PM, Spun Monkey said:

Where was the “AC” bouy or safe water mark painted bouy in this film?  Does it still exist as safe water A? 

Doing this from memory, so it may not be quite right. The AC buoy is no longer marked on the charts off Newport.

The DoG sets very specific requirements for the AC race course: ocean course, free from headlands, racing area suited for boats of 22 feet draft (about 6.7 m).The required courses are long--39 miles and 40 miles-- and they cover a lot of area, since they may need to be set in winds from any point in the compass. (Those courses and requirements can be changed by mutual consent, I believe.)

The AC buoy essentially marked the center of that suitable racing area, and was the reference point used to set the courses. In the pre-GPS days, it was easier to set the buoy for the entire racing season rather than try to figure it out on a daily basis.

It was a long way out there, maybe a two-hour tow or sail from Newport. Nevertheless, thousands of boats--some completely unsuited to be there--made that long trek every racing day. My first wife was driving a Hatteras as a photo boat for a bunch of photographers in the late 70s- early 80s, and I was skippering a charter sailboat for a bunch of rich, drunk Texans. Good times, in hindsight, although it seemed like work at the time.

In the DoG match in Valencia, the boats were launched in the dark if they were not in the water overnight, and it was a long, long way to the racing area in freezing cold February weather. It was a long way out off Point Loma in San Diego, as well,  but not quite as cold.

That's a far cry from the venues either in San Francisco or Bermuda. Bermuda was like going to the beach every day, which is what a lot of people did.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...