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Dumb question about galley countertops


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So as part of my imposed refit while waiting for a replacement mast I decided to put new counter tops in the galley and head (and a new headliner while I am at it). I went to several places yesterday looking for Formica (or something similar), and everyone looked at me as if I were a mutant. What do people use, and where do they get it?

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"plastic laminate" or "high pressure laminate" is the generic name. Home Depot has it.

I've used door skin plywood. Rub in some epoxy and varnish. Looks kinda classy. Easier to buy and work with. Formica is kinda fussy. Simple to replace when it gets tired.

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1 minute ago, El Boracho said:

"plastic laminate" or "high pressure laminate" is the generic name. Home Depot has it.

I've used door skin plywood. Rub in some epoxy and varnish. Looks kinda classy. Easier to buy and work with. Formica is kinda fussy. Simple to replace when it gets tired.

Thanks!

So I went to Home Depot yesterday, and as usual everyone there is useless. FRP looked like it would work for the headliner, but they won't cut it so I couldn't fit it in my car (apparently it sparks when you cut it). I guess they have plastic laminate, but it is a special order item and also comes in 4x8 sheets which they won't cut. I guess I will just have to find a buddy with a pickup.

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I've always bought Formica cut to partial sheets at counter top contractors. It took a few days. I assume it comes from the supplier in any size they order...???

Good old Formica was thick (1/16"?). It hid a multitude of sins and was tough. The newer stuff is really thin, fragile and any defect will show thru. Don't know if the thick is still sold...

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2 minutes ago, El Boracho said:

I've always bought Formica cut to partial sheets at counter top contractors. It took a few days. I assume it comes from the supplier in any size they order...???

Good old Formica was thick (1/16"?). It hid a multitude of sins and was tough. The newer stuff is really thin, fragile and any defect will show thru. Don't know if the thick is still sold...

Thick, tough and hiding a multitude of sins was exactly what I wanted! :lol:

I was just planning to glue new white Formica over the old 1960's Formica. I am reluctant to special order it because if it isn't what I wanted (if defects show through, for example) I will be stuck with it...

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High Pressure Laminate is dead easy to work with. I'm surprised at the comments about it being hard to find - check with specialty plywood suppliers instead of big box stores.

There are two grades of laminate - vertical surface (thin) and horizontal (thick).

If weight is not a concern Corian or variants is really nice.

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Just now, SloopJonB said:

High Pressure Laminate is dead easy to work with. I'm surprised at the comments about it being hard to find - check with specialty plywood suppliers instead of big box stores.

There are two grades of laminate - vertical surface (thin) and horizontal (thick).

If weight is not a concern Corian or variants is really nice.

Weight is absolutely a concern. It is a racing boat so granite countertops are not what the Doctor ordered... Just something that doesn't have 55 years of rust stains.

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6 minutes ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

Thick, tough and hiding a multitude of sins was exactly what I wanted! :lol:

I was just planning to glue new white Formica over the old 1960's Formica. I am reluctant to special order it because if it isn't what I wanted (if defects show through, for example) I will be stuck with it...

Lift the old stuff - an iron or heat gun will release the contact cement. If you must leave the old stuff in place, thoroughly abrade it to give some tooth for the cement.

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Look for countertop contractors - they should be able to get you exactly what you want. Formica brands has 2 thicknesses, the thicker one is the good old stuff, designed for flat installations. The thinner stuff is for when you have a wrapped edge. 

Even the thick stuff will roll into a 24" diameter - I brought home a 5x10 sheet in the back of a ford escape.

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13 minutes ago, andykane said:

Look for countertop contractors - they should be able to get you exactly what you want. Formica brands has 2 thicknesses, the thicker one is the good old stuff, designed for flat installations. The thinner stuff is for when you have a wrapped edge. 

Even the thick stuff will roll into a 24" diameter - I brought home a 5x10 sheet in the back of a ford escape.

Fantastic, thanks. 

I told my roommate I was going to ask the Internet for the answer, and she laughed at me. Well, half an hour later the Internet has given me a comprehensive, accurate answer and good advice as well.

Thanks everyone!

As long as I am at it, where does a middle aged divorced white guy with poor financial prospects and an expensive wooden boat addiction find a 25 year old highly educated Venezuelan or Norwegian supermodel with a sarcastic sense of humor looking for love?

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23 minutes ago, Hitchhiker said:

This is not load bearing so the carbon is too heavy. The HPL is lighter per square foot.

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7 minutes ago, SF Woody Sailor said:
14 minutes ago, VWAP said:

For the amount of use it gets use a piece of color fin ply.  Ask around for a small piece

 

https://www.roberts-plywood.com/colorfin-koskisen---koskidecor.html

Too thick unfortunately.

And the equivalent of using a piece of IKEA cabinet material.

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9 minutes ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

This is not load bearing so the carbon is too heavy. The HPL is lighter per square foot.

replace the top with this ply.

Very durable high quality product. 

 

 

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7 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

And the equivalent of using a piece of IKEA cabinet material.

nope

u r clueless once again 

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2 minutes ago, VWAP said:

 

replace the top with this ply.

 

 

Start with the fact that it is not marine grade ply. Then add the fact that it is not simple to replace the plywood. Then add the fact that parts of what are being replaced (for example the top of the ice chest) are not plywood at all.

Formica (which is apparently just a brand of generic HPL) is the answer.

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36 minutes ago, VWAP said:
42 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

And the equivalent of using a piece of IKEA cabinet material.

nope

u r clueless once again 

I figured this was directed at me so I peeked.

:lol: Thin phenolic coating on birch ply

on a boat. :lol:

I bow to your obvious experience and expertise.

 

I just hope and trust that SF Woody realizes that you are an ignoramus.

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1 hour ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

Start with the fact that it is not marine grade ply. Then add the fact that it is not simple to replace the plywood. Then add the fact that parts of what are being replaced (for example the top of the ice chest) are not plywood at all.

Formica (which is apparently just a brand of generic HPL) is the answer.

exterior grade panel, no voids in the core. The product was initially for use as concrete forming board. Makes sense not to use if it is difficult to replace the entire top. Too bad it is a great high quality product.They make a embossed hex pattern pattern with the same phenolic film that is used for industrial decking and boat interiors. 

 

"Finland Form® is bonded with a phenolic resin adhesive which is weather and boil proof. The formaldehyde glue emissions are classified as E-1, the lowest available in the industry. Specify Finland Form® to assure high-performance results."

 

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What about a counter top in a can?

Some table top epoxy coat; you can add pigments to your liking. You can even do top opening icebox covers. Something like these guys did, even if you can question the colors choices and the top icebox lid did not work perfectly...

 

But maybe it is too heavy for your application...

 

 

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I went to a local specialty hardware store and found a laminate pattern that most closely matched the tiny galley formica from 1970.  Then ordered insanely expensive small pieces from them.  Then found out I could order a whole 5' x 10' sheet of the same stuff from Amazon for much less money - came in a big roll on a UPS truck.  A lifetime supply for any possible projects.  Now the added work surfaces on board far surpass the original bit, so I could have just as well used something entirely different.  

Though I didn't use it on the boat, I'm a big fan of cheap tile countertops.  Indestructible and you can put a hot pot down anywhere.  Not so great for things like chart tables though, and kinda heavy.  

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2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

I figured this was directed at me so I peeked.

:lol: Thin phenolic coating on birch ply

on a boat. :lol:

I bow to your obvious experience and expertise.

 

I just hope and trust that SF Woody realizes that you are an ignoramus.

You should stay in pa with all the other non sailors. 

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20 hours ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

Fantastic, thanks. 

I told my roommate I was going to ask the Internet for the answer, and she laughed at me. Well, half an hour later the Internet has given me a comprehensive, accurate answer and good advice as well.

Thanks everyone!

As long as I am at it, where does a middle aged divorced white guy with poor financial prospects and an expensive wooden boat addiction find a 25 year old highly educated Venezuelan or Norwegian supermodel with a sarcastic sense of humor looking for love?

I'd pay for that info!

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21 hours ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

 

As long as I am at it, where does a middle aged divorced white guy with poor financial prospects and an expensive wooden boat addiction find a 25 year old highly educated Venezuelan or Norwegian supermodel with a sarcastic sense of humor looking for love?

are u good with 2 out of 4

 

DSC_3726.jpg?v=1570263440

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Just now, Black Sox said:

Pshaw.

Unobtanium, fixed with unicorn toenail resin. Your only man.

I have a Centaur doing mast (he can reach way up high to jump the halyards) and a Pegasus doing bow (the wings help get to the masthead quick to uncross halyards after a couple of midnight peels). If I can figure out some kind of counterweighted traveler system I will put Stephen Hawking back there on tactics. VWAP's Norwegian friend will be squirrel and massage my shoulders on long downwind legs. Get an octopus in the pit... I can see this working out.

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Home Depot? Youre in SF, you could probably dumpster dive some super high quality materials from some tech exec's multi-million dollar kitchen remodel in the Marina or Pac Heights.

Regards,

Mike

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8 minutes ago, MikeR80 said:

Home Depot? Youre in SF, you could probably dumpster dive some super high quality materials from some tech exec's multi-million dollar kitchen remodel in the Marina or Pac Heights.

Regards,

Mike

Good thinking. I was going to go for something like this in the galley on my 36 foot racer/cruiser, but I am worried that the 1.5oz runner might get caught on a drawer pull when it is wet.

 

Galley.jpg

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3 hours ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

 

Does she dip pole?

Check the brochure.

Oh

and the return policy just in case the chemistry is not there. 

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Don't know where you are in the Bay Area, but I bought a sheet at San Rafael lumber. They actually call it Formica (after initial confusion, I figured out it is pronounced "ForMAIka"). They had off white and a few others in stock. And as said above it can be rolled and fits on your back seat. 

Cutting tip: cut slightly too large, glue it down, use a router with trimming bit to cut of the excess. Works ridiculously easy.

Say hi to your roommate! 

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5 minutes ago, AnotherSailor said:

Don't know where you are in the Bay Area, but I bought a sheet at San Rafael lumber. They actually call it Formica (after initial confusion, I figured out it is pronounced "ForMAIka"). They had off white and a few others in stock. And as said above it can be rolled and fits on your back seat. 

Cutting tip: cut slightly too large, glue it down, use a router with trimming bit to cut of the excess. Works ridiculously easy.

Say hi to your roommate! 

Funny! After going 10 places (including Jackson’s, Tap Platics, etc) I finally ended up at San Rafael Lumber yesterday. They didn’t have any in stock but are going to order 3 4x8 sheets of white tomorrow. Thanks to another suggestion from here I was going to take the old countertops off and use them as a pattern to cut the new ones with a jig saw. Will that work? 

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Ha, that is funny. I was in the same area yesterday.

If you can get the old countertops off in one piece I would be impressed. The stuff easily tears easily, so when you saw make sure it is well supported close to the cut and use a new saw. High speed works best for a jig saw. Maybe it is my shitty jigsaw, but it has trouble following a straight line. If I remember correctly, I believe you cut it upside down, because of the chips the saw will otherwise take out (obviously, you want to test it). If you have a router: it cuts like butter. If you cannot use a trim bit, just clamp a plank or something else that is straight to use as a guide.

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1 hour ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

Funny! After going 10 places (including Jackson’s, Tap Platics, etc) I finally ended up at San Rafael Lumber yesterday. They didn’t have any in stock but are going to order 3 4x8 sheets of white tomorrow. Thanks to another suggestion from here I was going to take the old countertops off and use them as a pattern to cut the new ones with a jig saw. Will that work? 

Don’t know, but I’ll buy your excess...

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1 hour ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

 I was going to take the old countertops off and use them as a pattern to cut the new ones with a jig saw. Will that work? 

NO.

Even if you get them off in one piece, DO NOT cut to match - cut oversize by 1/4" or so on all sides then after gluing it down with overhangs, as Another said, use a "flush trim" bit in a router - they will come out perfect.

This is the only method to use - if you don't have a router, get one or borrow one or rent one. Trying to saw or cut laminate to a "good" edge is an exercise in futility.

This process is so easy and works so perfectly that you're going to want to put laminate everywhere. :D

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This ^^^

However, being a boat, never assume any edges are actually straight, or corners square, when trimming the back edges along a board.

Also, when using a flush trim bit check the existing countertop edges very carefully for rotten, soft, thin, or missing spots. Ask me how I know.

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1 hour ago, Raz'r said:

Don’t know, but I’ll buy your excess...

I am using it for the overhead as well. The overhead is about 5' wide so from each 8 footer I am scrapping 3 (actually, I am using that excess for the counter tops). I am sure I will have quite a bit left over.

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

NO.

Even if you get them off in one piece, DO NOT cut to match - cut oversize by 1/4" or so on all sides then after gluing it down with overhangs, as Another said, use a "flush trim" bit in a router - they will come out perfect.

This is the only method to use - if you don't have a router, get one or borrow one or rent one. Trying to saw or cut laminate to a "good" edge is an exercise in futility.

This process is so easy and works so perfectly that you're going to want to put laminate everywhere. :D

I have routers (plunge and regular), but I can't cut oversize with an overhang and rout to flush because in each case there are varnished fiddles around the edge. I will take a photo tomorrow which will make more sense. 

I guess I could cut all the panels slightly oversize with a Skilsaw and jig saw for the radii at the corners and the sink and then bring a couple of sawhorses and the router to the boat and finish them there. 

Edited by SF Woody Sailor
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1 minute ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

I have routers (plunge and regular), but I can't cut oversize with an overhang and rout to flush because in each case there are varnished fiddles around the edge. I will take a photo tomorrow which will make more sense. 

I guess I could cut all the panels slightly oversize with a Skilsaw and jig saw for the radii at the corners and the sink and then bring a couple of sawhorses and the router to the boat and finish them there. 

Yep, same, I have fiddles in place...

I might as well replace the laminate, everything else is new...

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51 minutes ago, El Boracho said:

This ^^^

However, being a boat, never assume any edges are actually straight, or corners square, when trimming the back edges along a board.

Also, when using a flush trim bit check the existing countertop edges very carefully for rotten, soft, thin, or missing spots. Ask me how I know.

No assumption that they are straight or corners are square. I was going to make cardboard templates of everything until Mr. JonB's suggestion about lifting the old ones off with a heat gun. Once I do that I will have an exact template.

Good advice about soft and thin parts. Much easier to use penetrating epoxy now than 50 years from now when my kids have to do it next time.

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On 8/15/2020 at 8:57 AM, SF Woody Sailor said:

Weight is absolutely a concern. It is a racing boat so granite countertops are not what the Doctor ordered... Just something that doesn't have 55 years of rust stains.

Go to a real store.   Look for a local laminate distributor that sells retail.  Flooring, countertops and tile are typically sold in the same building product stores.  Lowe's is not a building products store it is a crappy DIY store with 80% of the things you need for any particular project and one or two vendors for each  product category, almost always at the low end of the quality scale.  Good place to buy rattle cans of spray paint though.  

The transport issue is ridiculous.  Plastic laminate sheets can be rolled up and stuffed though a car window.  Just not at freezing temperatures.  You can do the installation yourself, if you are handy with a decent router and have a laminate cutting tool.  Tight places that you can't pre-cut can be detailed with a fine flat file.  Plenty of tutorials on line. 

Plastic laminate is made by a number of companies:  Wilsonart, Nevamar, Formica, Pionite, Laminart, etc.  They are all essentially the same but offer different colors and patterns.  Plastic laminate is tough and lightweight.  It's what you want.

Corian is a terrible but oddly popular countertop material.  It stains, cuts, scratches and cannot handle hot pots placed on it.  Granite composite countertops, like Silestone, Caesarstone, etc. have fewer of the disadvantages and are generally OK.  But not for boats where weight matters or the surface might get rough usage?  

 

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2 hours ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

I have routers (plunge and regular), but I can't cut oversize with an overhang and rout to flush because in each case there are varnished fiddles around the edge. I will take a photo tomorrow which will make more sense. 

I guess I could cut all the panels slightly oversize with a Skilsaw and jig saw for the radii at the corners and the sink and then bring a couple of sawhorses and the router to the boat and finish them there. 

Make a template out of 1/2 ply then rout the laminate to the exact shape

 

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2 hours ago, Left Shift said:

Go to a real store.   Look for a local laminate distributor that sells retail.  Flooring, countertops and tile are typically sold in the same building product stores.  Lowe's is not a building products store it is a crappy DIY store with 80% of the things you need for any particular project and one or two vendors for each  product category, almost always at the low end of the quality scale.  Good place to buy rattle cans of spray paint though.  

The transport issue is ridiculous.  Plastic laminate sheets can be rolled up and stuffed though a car window.  Just not at freezing temperatures.  You can do the installation yourself, if you are handy with a decent router and have a laminate cutting tool.  Tight places that you can't pre-cut can be detailed with a fine flat file.  Plenty of tutorials on line. 

Plastic laminate is made by a number of companies:  Wilsonart, Nevamar, Formica, Pionite, Laminart, etc.  They are all essentially the same but offer different colors and patterns.  Plastic laminate is tough and lightweight.  It's what you want.

Corian is a terrible but oddly popular countertop material.  It stains, cuts, scratches and cannot handle hot pots placed on it.  Granite composite countertops, like Silestone, Caesarstone, etc. have fewer of the disadvantages and are generally OK.  But not for boats where weight matters or the surface might get rough usage?  

 

Yah, corian is difficult over time 

 

6mm teak  over 6mm ply is a good choice ...easy to refinish as time takes its toll

this countertop is 25 years old 

 

 

C3BE9895-DAEF-4F8A-8955-F71710810D76.png

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17 minutes ago, slug zitski said:

Yah, corian is difficult over time 

 

6mm teak  over 6mm ply is a good choice ...easy to refinish as time takes its toll

this countertop is 25 years old 

 

 

C3BE9895-DAEF-4F8A-8955-F71710810D76.png

well, that's pretty fucking, well, pretty

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3 hours ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

I have routers (plunge and regular), but I can't cut oversize with an overhang and rout to flush because in each case there are varnished fiddles around the edge. I will take a photo tomorrow which will make more sense. 

I guess I could cut all the panels slightly oversize with a Skilsaw and jig saw for the radii at the corners and the sink and then bring a couple of sawhorses and the router to the boat and finish them there. 

In every case I have ever seen those fiddles are installed after the laminate so they will have to be removed to get anywhere. No way are you going to be able to cut laminate to perfectly drop into the "hole" they create.

When you reinstall them, glue the screw plugs in with varnish instead of glue - for the next time. Much easier to remove than glued plugs.

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Best approach is to make a heavy paper pattern of the existing substrate. It's okay if this pattern is not perfect: just mark your offsets on it (+1/8"; -3/6 here; undercut here). Transfer this pattern onto any old shit 1/4" hardboard, ABS, MDF, etc scrap, with corrections factored in. Test fit your new template. Then 2-sided tape your HPL onto the template and pattern rout to fit. Perfect this in place, glue it down, and caulk any gaps with  a good silicone latex caulk.

NB: HPL has a serious problem with thermal expansion, and most contact cements are frankly crap in shear and will fail if you see temperature swings > 80F. Also, plain old interior temps over 110F may cause contact cements to release, same as a heat gun. If replacing HPL with HPL and reusing/refreshing the contact glue, that's pretty much your only choice. If you abrade the existing HPL (and its bond is good), consider epoxy or even a high quality PVA like Titebond 3. I'd go with epoxy, myself.

Honestly, if weight is a big deal, I'd Coosa the hell out of this countertop.

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3 hours ago, slug zitski said:

Yah, corian is difficult over time 

 

6mm teak  over 6mm ply is a good choice ...easy to refinish as time takes its toll

this countertop is 25 years old 

 

 

C3BE9895-DAEF-4F8A-8955-F71710810D76.png

Think Id feel like I was living in a tree

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Used laminex a while ago for a boat refit, it started bubbling and separating from the base after a couple of years.

Ripped it out, the base was epoxy sealed ply, so I stripped the contact and put down a couple of coats of white two pot epoxy primer.

Works well, any blemishes just sand and recoat, it’s a nice semigloss finish...

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Late to the party here...

Go to a flooring store and take a look at Marmoleun.

https://www.forbo.com/flooring/en-us/products/residential-products/cgnra1

I first found it in Starbucks stores where it was used for the countertop surfaces in the POS areas.

It's a sheeting product, not tile, very durable and really easy to work with, it has a jute backing and just glues down to the existing countertop. Fids/rails need to be trimmed to fit after installation but the stuff is pretty cool and isn't affected in a marine environment.

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7 hours ago, Left Shift said:

 

Corian is a terrible but oddly popular countertop material.  It stains, cuts, scratches and cannot handle hot pots placed on it.  Granite composite countertops, like Silestone, Caesarstone, etc. have fewer of the disadvantages and are generally OK.  But not for boats where weight matters or the surface might get rough usage?  

 

Corian is a fantastic product due to those very properties. It is designed to be a wear surface so clean it with abrasive cleansers and those scratches will come out. The material WILL NOT stain though it might appear to if it is really scratched. Again, clean it with abrasive cleanser like comet and the "stains" will come right out. Having said that. it will be heavier than marine ply with plastic laminate over it. Been a cabinetmaker and boater for over 30 years. 

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3 hours ago, danstanford said:

Corian is a fantastic product due to those very properties. It is designed to be a wear surface so clean it with abrasive cleansers and those scratches will come out. The material WILL NOT stain though it might appear to if it is really scratched. Again, clean it with abrasive cleanser like comet and the "stains" will come right out. Having said that. it will be heavier than marine ply with plastic laminate over it. Been a cabinetmaker and boater for over 30 years. 

Corian works , 

Wet sandpaper and rubbing compound does a good job reconditioning

inside corners and  hardware transitions are tedious to recondition 

 Corian tends to pick up stains , yellowing as the surface ages 

high skill level and sharp tools  needed to construct a  corian surface covering  

mechanicsl fasteners into the corian need proper detailing 

 

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2 hours ago, slug zitski said:

Corian works , 

Wet sandpaper and rubbing compound does a good job reconditioning

inside corners and  hardware transitions are tedious to recondition 

 Corian tends to pick up stains , yellowing as the surface ages 

high skill level and sharp tools  needed to construct a  corian surface covering  

mechanicsl fasteners into the corian need proper detailing 

 

If I need to wet sand my countertop as part of a cleaning routine, I start wondering why I chose that material in the first place.  

(Having designed approximately 10,000 apartment/condo units, we have never installed Corian as a countertop material due to maintenance issues.)  

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23 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

If I need to wet sand my countertop as part of a cleaning routine, I start wondering why I chose that material in the first place.  

(Having designed approximately 10,000 apartment/condo units, we have never installed Corian as a countertop material due to maintenance issues.)  

damn anti-traditonalist! What do you think that holy-stoning of the old teak desks was?

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44 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

If I need to wet sand my countertop as part of a cleaning routine, I start wondering why I chose that material in the first place.  

(Having designed approximately 10,000 apartment/condo units, we have never installed Corian as a countertop material due to maintenance issues.)  

With a plastic laminate  like Formica you can never repair it as it ages ,

 

openings like  top load refers that must be banded  are troublesome over time 

 

boat and houses are different 

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This thread has been delightfully informative, positive and productive. Thank you all.

I thought I would post some "before" photos as well as the plan of action as I see it.

Photos are cabin looking forward and head countertop. As you can see the fiddles and backing don't lend themselves to making the countertops oversize and routing to flush.

To recap, I lost the rig on July 1 so I am done for the season until Buzz builds a new one so I have some time. I have removed the headliner. I am in the process of stripping all the interior paint and varnish to start over.

I will take SloopJonB's advice and remove the existing Formica countertops with an iron. This should give me a good template. I will clean up the old marine grade ply (assuming that is what I find) with 40 grit sandpaper.

I will order a sheet of white Formica from Rafael Lumber to see what I am working with. I have already ordered and received a new stainless sink and Whale spout from FIsheries Supply.

I will make a template for the countertop in the head from scrap plywood until it fits to the best of my limited ability. (start with the head since it is smaller and simpler). 

I will use a router (with guides for the straight edges) to cut the Formica to size. I will triple check that the Formica fits.

I will apply the new Formica with contact cement or Resorcinol and something heavy. I have an ex-girlfriend who has put on quite a few pounds so if I give her some taffy and Sudoku maybe she will sit still. I am in San Francisco so temperature swings aren't really a problem.

What am I missing?

I will take pictures "after" so you all can prostrate yourselves before me.

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IMG_1247.JPG

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I'd never put corian in an apartment or condo if if was a rental, too many stupid tennants that think is bullet proof. Its just an acrylic sheet. I'm making an Island kitchen top from it because I can process Corian at home , track saw is the ticket, and it all just glues together with color matched epoxy. I take it to a matte finish as i dont like glossy tops anyway.

If you make paper templates , formica can be made "close enough' if you cant router trim , you can buy a laminate file and cut very quickly , support the edge over a piece of plywood 

 

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8 minutes ago, Glenn McCarthy said:

 

the rustoleum countertop fix is like a 3" dick, it will get the job done but nobody will be pleased. 

I'd use it in a garage or cheap rental apt. or something like that, never in my house

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3 minutes ago, crankcall said:

 

the rustoleum countertop fix is like a 3" dick, it will get the job done but nobody will be pleased. 

I'd use it in a garage or cheap rental apt. or something like that, never in my house

race boat.

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55 minutes ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

This thread has been delightfully informative, positive and productive. Thank you all.

I thought I would post some "before" photos as well as the plan of action as I see it.

Photos are cabin looking forward and head countertop. As you can see the fiddles and backing don't lend themselves to making the countertops oversize and routing to flush.

To recap, I lost the rig on July 1 so I am done for the season until Buzz builds a new one so I have some time. I have removed the headliner. I am in the process of stripping all the interior paint and varnish to start over.

I will take SloopJonB's advice and remove the existing Formica countertops with an iron. This should give me a good template. I will clean up the old marine grade ply (assuming that is what I find) with 40 grit sandpaper.

I will order a sheet of white Formica from Rafael Lumber to see what I am working with. I have already ordered and received a new stainless sink and Whale spout from FIsheries Supply.

I will make a template for the countertop in the head from scrap plywood until it fits to the best of my limited ability. (start with the head since it is smaller and simpler). 

I will use a router (with guides for the straight edges) to cut the Formica to size. I will triple check that the Formica fits.

I will apply the new Formica with contact cement or Resorcinol and something heavy. I have an ex-girlfriend who has put on quite a few pounds so if I give her some taffy and Sudoku maybe she will sit still. I am in San Francisco so temperature swings aren't really a problem.

What am I missing?

I will take pictures "after" so you all can prostrate yourselves before me.

IMG_1245.JPG

IMG_1247.JPG

I would definitely remove those fiddles - getting all 6 of those sides & curves cut precisely beforehand is going to be virtually impossible.

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You know what might work? Is the boat on the hard?
Lay down your favorite veneer

build a dam around the cutouts. Poor in clear table-top epoxy.

but if the boats on the water, the movement may f' it up.

I did this to build an oversized lazy Susan for the wife's too-big-to-reach-across dining table. Was easy, worked really well.

The trick is to coat it once, let partially cure, then do the pour. If you don't let that first partially cure, you'll get little bubbles.

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2 hours ago, slug zitski said:

With a plastic laminate  like Formica you can never repair it as it ages ,

 

openings like  top load refers that must be banded  are troublesome over time 

 

boat and houses are different 

Go with stainless counter tops for durability

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