Billy Bob

Ditch the rig

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Thinking about removing the mast and putting outboards on NACRA 36. Also a nice ultralight cabin pod.

Thoughts? 

Had the boat as a racing cat for 21years. Time to do something different. Tried to sell it but it wasn't worth anything as a sailboat.

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I think it's an excellent idea. Will you keep the beams where they are and put the superstructure on top of them? Keeping from overloading the tail is going to be a challenge, but I think you were talking about twin 30's, which seems appropriate. My old powercat was based on Tornado hulls and would cruise at 15 knots with 15 hp. I'm building a bigger one now, which will have 20 hp, but both of mine use a single outboard with a fairing in front of it. Will you make it narrower?

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2 hours ago, Russell Brown said:

I think it's an excellent idea. Will you keep the beams where they are and put the superstructure on top of them? Keeping from overloading the tail is going to be a challenge, but I think you were talking about twin 30's, which seems appropriate. My old powercat was based on Tornado hulls and would cruise at 15 knots with 15 hp. I'm building a bigger one now, which will have 20 hp, but both of mine use a single outboard with a fairing in front of it. Will you make it narrower?

What would you guys think about this for a 14' wide Reynolds 33?  Looks like Reynolds built at least one.

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I drove the R33 powercat in the swell off Huntington Beach.  It had a hard deck, center console, and T-top.  I think it started life as twin 40's, and then upgraded to twin 60's.  it was a blast to drive.  It needed more hand rails.  It had the power cat behavior of leaning out of the turns instead of into them.

-Mike

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The R33 power cat worked very nicely indeed.  One thought might be to put 1 larger outboard in some kind of center pod to improve weight distribution..?

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Check. out Roy Seamans, old nacra36 the joker it had a sweet cabin.   Tom Roland had some drawings of it.  I thought of doing myself with  variable stern sections for trim tabs until I got the horizontal balance right,[the hulls. have a lot of stern rocker. to counterbalance the tall rig].    Good luck!

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I'll have photos soon of the motor mount/sled & fairing of my new single engine power cat.

Any photos of the Reynolds 33 power cat?

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Russell,  go to the R33 web sight it used to show one.

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I have similar idea as the R33 except a lightly built pod (think Santa Cruz boats type interior), standing headroom, head, galley on one side, large berth forward, seating along other side and a folding leaf table in the middle. Pod will be 3m wide x 4m long. Back deck area 3 m x 3m flat.  Max beam about 4.5 m probably a bit smaller. Outboards on hulls. Pod will attach the same way as they do now but with short poles attached to the side of the pod. The pod will be detachable for trailering. Minimal systems electrical, plumbing etc. Very minimal. Nothing in hulls.  Anchor prod forward. Shade on the deck. As simple as possible. Honey moon cruiser, surfing p!storm and light fishing boat. On the weekend I will post my rudimentary drawings when I can be fucked going on my desk top computer. 

Not a lot of this type configuration out there to glean ideas from. 

Chop chop as soon as I finish my new hollow wooden sup build.

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What's all the spray behind the R 33? Is it the underwing?

It seems like the level of the crossarms is a limiting factor for rougher water use. Will the pod floor be higher than the upper edges of the crossarms? If so, the crossarms could have fairings. I wouldn't think it was a great idea if the plan wasn't low horsepower and moderate speeds.

DSC_7612.jpeg

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Russell,   waterstrider.   please tell me about the hull design.

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27 minutes ago, guerdon said:

Russell,   waterstrider.   please tell me about the hull design.

Looks like

tornado_photo.jpg

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1 hour ago, Russell Brown said:

What's all the spray behind the R 33? Is it the underwing?

It seems like the level of the crossarms is a limiting factor for rougher water use. Will the pod floor be higher than the upper edges of the crossarms? If so, the crossarms could have fairings. I wouldn't think it was a great idea if the plan wasn't low horsepower and moderate speeds.

DSC_7612.jpeg

I would love a little commuter that can handle the main SFBay winds in the summer, as I commute from the South Bay to Richmond. It gets gnarly in 2 places, Angel Island to Cityfront, and the Gulf of Candlestick.

We tried a big diesel hog. Nope, that sucked.

In the really nasty I'm totally fine throttling back to 8 knots, but would like to spin around 20 knots in flattish water, at 3/4 RPM limit. I hate running flat out on outboards. They suck fuel, make noise, it's just not fun.

Oh, and it has to keep the passengers dry and comfy.

Nothing overnight needed. 

Woods' "Skoota" is very cool, but is limited in speed to more like 12. That would make the 16NM trip pretty long.

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Funny — I’m in the process of doing the same thing on a smaller scale: I just picked up a Nacra 6.0 with some storm damage and am looking to add a couple of trolling motors and lithium batteries.

The motors will be 86 lbs thrust each, but I haven’t settled on any other equipment yet.

Deck / superstructure etc will be based on how it performs.

I am also considering a single center-mounted gas outboard, but for now, electric is the first choice.

Thoughts, comments, etc are welcomed and encouraged (:-)

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With a flat bottom on the pod and a curve up in the front to keep the spray going down is going to be my call for my area. Most of the flat underpod will be at least 400mm above the water. I would like to have more clearance but esthetics wise with full headroom not very good looking on a low freeboard cat. The back beam 400 mms above the water as a sailing cat never really drug in the water even while healed over. It's all a bit of shot in the dark with outboards driving the sterns down evenly. I don't plan to go out in rough weather but the wind does blow here and the chop gets up a bit. Wind is usually offshore so not much swell just chop.

A single outboard would be less maneuverable. On my size boat two makes more sense for me. I'm thinking about a small fin forward where the daggerboard cases are for directional stability. 

 

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Google Bob Oram 9m pod power cat. Interesting simple boat.

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Might there be some advantages to making the boat much narrower?  Less twisting, maneuverability, slippage and trailering?  

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On 8/18/2020 at 7:23 AM, guerdon said:

Russell,   waterstrider.   please tell me about the hull design.

Irens designed trimaran outrigger hulls. I built female molds for them about 20 years ago, built a set for the trimaran they were intended for and then built a set for myself so that I could build the same tri for myself, which I never did. Decided to use them for a new Grasshopper, thus starting the most complex boat I've ever built. Benn on it, off and on for about 8 years and I don't even know if it's going to work worth a damm. I have weird dreams about it. Sure are beautiful hulls though. 

DSC_5700.jpeg

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Russell, I believe you will be rewarded with well rounded performance since you seem to have located the outboard in the right spot.   I do some. of my best work while dreaming[no pesky construction flaws, accurate part alignment, weight is never a issue, nor cost, no stupid people. ect].   You know your on the right track when people tell you "in your dreams".

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9 hours ago, Billy Bob said:

I'm thinking about a small fin forward where the daggerboard cases are for directional stability. 

You won't need it. Long skinny hulls resist turning (think kayaks, rowing shells, and catamarans!)

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Russel, how long are those hulls? What are they made of? What do they weigh? Do you wanna sell 'em?

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Nice - Catalina island?

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On 8/19/2020 at 7:37 AM, Gabe_nyc said:

Funny — I’m in the process of doing the same thing on a smaller scale: I just picked up a Nacra 6.0 with some storm damage and am looking to add a couple of trolling motors and lithium batteries.

The motors will be 86 lbs thrust each, but I haven’t settled on any other equipment yet.

Deck / superstructure etc will be based on how it performs.

I am also considering a single center-mounted gas outboard, but for now, electric is the first choice.

Thoughts, comments, etc are welcomed and encouraged (:-)

Didn't want to bin our old Nacra 6.0

Priority was fun without spending too much.

Couple of issue are you can't put too heavy a motor on the back (we are using an old Yamaha 25 two stroke)

Also you are in the line of fire for spray coming off the bows. We have extended the front deck which has helped but might fit spray rails and/or windscreen.

You might consider some kind of motor near the mast beam with a long prop shaft and use the original rudders if they are serviceable. 

20200812_183731.jpg

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19 hours ago, boardhead said:

Nice - Catalina island?

More likely Vieques in the Spanish Virgin Islands.  Boat was built for liberty daysails for Navy personnel out of Roosevelt Roads base on the Eastern end of Puerto Rico. 

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1 hour ago, linz765 said:

Didn't want to bin our old Nacra 6.0

Priority was fun without spending too much.

Couple of issue are you can't put too heavy a motor on the back (we are using an old Yamaha 25 two stroke)

Also you are in the line of fire for spray coming off the bows. We have extended the front deck which has helped but might fit spray rails and/or windscreen.

You might consider some kind of motor near the mast beam with a long prop shaft and use the original rudders if they are serviceable. 

20200812_183731.jpg

That looks like fun!

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11 hours ago, linz765 said:

Didn't want to bin our old Nacra 6.0

Priority was fun without spending too much.

Couple of issue are you can't put too heavy a motor on the back (we are using an old Yamaha 25 two stroke)

Also you are in the line of fire for spray coming off the bows. We have extended the front deck which has helped but might fit spray rails and/or windscreen.

You might consider some kind of motor near the mast beam with a long prop shaft and use the original rudders if they are serviceable. 

That's a bitchin' ride! I'll bet 25 hp is ample power. Do you have a fairing in front of the leg? I'll have photos soon of the worlds most complex single engine cat motor mount/fairing. The Grasshopper (based on Tornado hulls) is the driest motor boat I've ever been on, but also fairly complex.

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7 hours ago, Russell Brown said:

That's a bitchin' ride! I'll bet 25 hp is ample power. Do you have a fairing in front of the leg? I'll have photos soon of the worlds most complex single engine cat motor mount/fairing. The Grasshopper (based on Tornado hulls) is the driest motor boat I've ever been on, but also fairly complex.

Don't have a fairing yet so would be keen to see that.

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Outboard legs are meant to be behind a transom, so below the upper cavitation plate is streamlined, but everything above that is shaped like a club. If you are driving without one, there would be a lot of spray and drag, especially at the speeds you are going. The fairing basically splits the water for the club-shaped part of the leg. There is a video on Off Center Harbor about the Grasshopper that shows the leg fairing, but I don't seem to have a photo of it.

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Do you have an accurate profile drawing of the hulls showing the beam locations to start with? 

I think that whatever you do will work, but how fast you are able to go in waves will depend on how high your underwing is off of the water and how the "box" is shaped. It seems like the underwing should land on top of the beams and the box could extend forward of the front beam. How air flows around the box will affect how wet it is. Getting the leading edge high to force the air down and having flare in the sides seems to really help.

sc00018ef7.jpg

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28 minutes ago, Russell Brown said:

How air flows around the box will affect how wet it is. Getting the leading edge high to force the air down and having flare in the sides seems to really help.

Russ, I've always appreciated that grasshopper boat of yours.  When our kids were little we often camp cruised the islands on my dads 17 runabout and loved it.  Did you do much experimentation with different flare shapes and box leading edges to come to the above conclusion?  It certainly makes sense.

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The beams location is pretty accurate (existing). Indicated by the circles at the shearline. As of now my thinking is the sole or floor will be 400mm above the water, maybe 450. That makes the cabin look not so high above the shearline and grotesque. The front beams will attach to the side of the pod. Back beam will bolt to the floor tray. I don't really plan to go out in rough weather. Very simple, light, aero pod shape with flat deck behind. The rocker in the floor  up in the front will carry up to about 900mms above the water so should keep a lot of the spray down. Two plans above shows this configuration. My plan for outboards are 2-2stroke 30hp. Light and simple. Sides will be angled in.  The object is to have a nice manageable, low running cost coastal cruiser for overnighting on a low budget.

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I’d keep some sailing/ motor sailing capability. Maybe a beach cat rig?  Enough sail to do 5-6 knots on a reach in 10 knots of breeze would be nice. Then motor home 

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it takes work to put a power cat together, start with 33ft carbon sl33 hulls, $30k without foils, $35k with $100k foils, i will run a ad

6846788_0_180220192120_4.jpg

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Just now, multihuler said:

it takes work to put a power cat together, start with 33ft carbon sl33 hulls, $30k without foils, $35k with $100k foils, i will run a ad

6846788_0_180220192120_4.jpg

 

20200830_170051.jpg

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Damn, go 10’ wide, cuddly cabin, keep the foils. What you you need, a couple 50s?

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2 hours ago, martin 'hoff said:

@multihuler  that's a beast. Is there a writeup about it anywhere? Videos? Polars, GPS tracks? 

Google Stratis catamaran,  she is a beast

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A cartoon of the Nacra 6.0 conversion we did years ago.

Used as the A Class Tuesday night committee boat.

Lots of storage under the "motorcycle" style seating, no shelter however, and it'd amazing how much a simple cockpit provides, but those big windbreaks on the standard crew coach catamaran are really a hell of a lot of windage.

Prescott added big bins where the centerboard trunks were for storing the ground tackle.

We didn't make the ass end of the centerline pod wide enough for the 15 hp outboard steering and control cables.

It wasn't a rocket, ( maybe 15 knots)  but it didn't have to be.  Sipped gas.

A Dolefin one of those cavitation plate hydrofoils was pretty key to preventing the hulls from squatting too much at speed.

A problem is that any sailing catamaran is going to be overloaded when you swap the mast and sails for an engine,  so you want to start with a pretty big set of hulls.

 

nacra 6.0 powercat.pdf

SHC

 

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9 hours ago, eastern motors said:

Did you buy it for more in NZ and cut the beams?

She was for sale for around $125k US, i paid around 40k delivered.

One of the thoughts is to turn her into a kite boat, and  I have the crew that wants to try.

She does has a seaplane style hull shape and would make a pretty cool/light 6846788_0_180220192120_4.jpg.8d24582b315eb861ee6d9780351dc191.jpg20200830_170011.thumb.jpg.76cafa4fbd10e89c4c6154d63c51f19a.jpgPower boat

 

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8 minutes ago, ProaSailor said:

Too bad those beams were cut though...

Yes, I wished I left her in NZ, the beams were glued in which made her not very user friendly.  Since a Reynolds 33 cat is around the same price I saw value in putting her back together, the rig is also incredible 

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34 minutes ago, multihuler said:

the beams were glued in which made her not very user friendly

Demountable beams would make the boat heavier though, eh?  Which doesn't serve the boat's primary purpose.  I never considered integral beams in so many Newick designs to be a liability.

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I rebuilt a Walter Green 35 foot tri that was chopped apart with a sawzall in Wisconsin and trucked West. Re-joining the hulls was very minor job with only a small weight penalty.

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15 hours ago, Russell Brown said:

I rebuilt a Walter Green 35 foot tri that was chopped apart with a sawzall in Wisconsin and trucked West. Re-joining the hulls was very minor job with only a small weight penalty.

Great, I will send you money, and the boat, actually heading to pt tomorrow.

As everyone is having a cow, they are just c beams, there were built to be demountable but someone glued them in place

 

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20 hours ago, ProaSailor said:

Demountable beams would make the boat heavier though, eh?  Which doesn't serve the boat's primary purpose.  I never considered integral beams in so many Newick designs to be a liability.

She can afford the extra weight in a repair/rebuild

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26 minutes ago, multihuler said:

She can afford the extra weight in a repair/rebuild

Good because you have no choice now.  "Having a cow"?  No, just commenting on the extra cost, work, time and weight involved in the decision to chop the beams.

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17 minutes ago, ProaSailor said:

Good because you have no choice now.  "Having a cow"?  No, just commenting on the extra cost, work, time and weight involved in the decision to chop the beams.

Work x time is becoming a problem , she was the testbed, and whatever modifications it takes to rebuild still gets a silly fast cat. 

 

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I am now pondering a single central mounted 60hp motor and a suspended center hull ( 1m wide) that just touches the water  to give more headroom height with a lower cabin profile. Do you think the boat will still turn well with a single motor? Had to get rid of the head/shower to just a head but keeps the boat versatile with a pod that can be mounted for power catting and still be able to be a racing cat with minimal hardware removal. The goal is to have a fast, clean, efficient power cruiser. I like the look of the nacra.  boat a above that looks like a jet ski. Was wondering if it turns like the titanic in wind and tide?

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I've gone to small spade rudders on the boat I'm building because the motor on Grasshopper didn't provide good control going downhill in waves. I think a meter wide underwing that was close to the water would be deafening. Maybe making it vee bottomed and raising the floor would make it work. The single 60 would be more fuel efficient than twins and the motor may be safer from dunking if mounted centrally. Post your sketches!

I'm going to have experience with a sled style motor mount/fairing with the boat I'm building. Photos of the mount soon, experience as soon as I get it running.

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It is a bit odd but how would a single motor mounted on one hull work?  The MacGregor 36 cat did this and it seemed to work OK with negligible steering offset required once going?  It puts the motor into an environment where it is designed to work (behind a transom) and is probably the lightest option?

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Turning circle is not great but not a problem. Might try dropping one of the daggerboards  back in to see what happens. 

Like most multis it tracks really well when moving but does get blown around when stationary. 

The gearbox let go so looking to replace it with a 30hp. The steering didn't seem to turn the motor as much as it should so will look to improve that.

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We put a 10hp honda four stroke (65kg) on a hobie 17, mounted forward on a frame, to test foil sections. Having the engine far forward did not make it difficult to maneouvre at all, there is so much thrust to turn compared to a rudder that the reduced lever is not a problem.

This rig does 12.5 knots with two people and the drag of a foil section, but this is limited by the prop pitch, not engine power, so would do more if pitched suitably.

h17.jpeg.52df742e245ff0b5671d95ed2ebb14da.jpeg

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That's cool! Is it operating now? It would be great to see some speed shots. Have you got a fairing in front of the fat part of the outboard leg? I would think that you would see more like 14 or 15 knots with that horsepower. A friend just got a Hobie 18 fully foiling with electric power. Should be a write up about it soon on Pro-Boat.

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Glad to see some test boats are out there for scaling. I have my concept just about sketched up. I'll try and post in the next couple days. The simpler I go the better it looks. I hope to get started by December/ January all going well. I'm right in the middle of finishing a 14ft hollow wooden SUP but I want to build hollow wooden 9ftr to fill out my quiver of surf vehicles. 

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12 hours ago, Russell Brown said:

That's cool! Is it operating now? It would be great to see some speed shots. Have you got a fairing in front of the fat part of the outboard leg? I would think that you would see more like 14 or 15 knots with that horsepower. A friend just got a Hobie 18 fully foiling with electric power. Should be a write up about it soon on Pro-Boat.

Yes, it converts from sailing to test rig by removing tramps and rudders, and adding the centre console/foil frame, so can be switched from one to the other in a couple of hours. No fairing in front of the leg, but its immersion means the blunt part of the leg is only just in the water. In any case, there is so much more power than the prop pitch can utilise it is not a restriction. It hits the rev limiter on about 2/3 throttle, so I would guess around 15kts if we pitched it properly, but we use the motor on a rib as well and the pitch is just right for that so we haven't changed it. Having more thrust available is good if we run with the cameras immersed as well as the test foil.

The console projects forward so the test foil sample is running in undisturbed water ahead of the hobie bow pressure wave. We only test in flat water otherwise the lift and drag data is too noisy, hence not having to care about the outboard leg immersion. We are not trying to fly this rig, this is to test foil sections and foil control systems only, to provide lift and drag data. It is effectively a mobile towing tank with the advantage of almost unlimited length of runs. We did consider electric power, but we are already carrying batteries for the data acquisition system and didn't want to be restricted as when the water is flat enough, we just want to test non-stop without having to recharge anything. You can't beat petrol for that, especially a four stroke as it can run at part throttle in a repeatable way all day.

We have lots of photo's and videos, I'll hunt some more out. It is probably doing 8-10kts in the picture above. It really doesn't make much of a wake, but you can see the white water from the prop wash projecting behind the hull transoms, so it is moving reasonably well in that photo.

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Surely all the “ coach “ catamarans you see at rowing competitions must give you all the info you need.

 

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These boats are pitch sensitive, so put the fuel at the longitudinal centre of buoyancy if it is a significant mass, so it won't trim as fuel is consumed. Doesn't matter if it is just a few gallons, but you don't want props sucking air on low fuel, or dragging the transoms when it is full.

This doesn't matter if you have other movable mass you can actively trim with as you use fuel.

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I know quite a bit about trim as I have had the boat as a racing catamaran for 21 years but point well taken. Fuel will probably be in center hull for the most part unless a long voyage is taken. Only one prop at this point and should be very well buried in the water.

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Put some temporary plywood under the rear beam to keep the spray down. Working on a fairing.

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That nacra needs the motor moving forward of the rear beam, so it could then trim more level and take passengers without dragging the transoms so much. Otherwise a nice setup, and those hulls can be found for next to nothing around here.

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I agree that the boat is a bit bow-high, but it seems like it's floating quite high in the water and the hulls look quite appropriate for the purpose. A hydrofoil on the leg of the motor may give you everything you need for trim, whether it's custom or a commercial one. Maybe you will turn it into a camp-cruiser tent platform and then you can store all the gear forward. That thing could go pretty far on a tank of gas.

The Grasshopper was a bit heavy for the displacement hulls and I built a hydrofoil for the leg but it forced the bow down and made it virtually un-steerable. Tornado hulls are quite fine forward.

 

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On 8/17/2020 at 1:40 AM, Billy Bob said:

Thinking about removing the mast and putting outboards on NACRA 36. Also a nice ultralight cabin pod.

Thoughts? 

Had the boat as a racing cat for 21years. Time to do something different. Tried to sell it but it wasn't worth anything as a sailboat.

Couple in Barra MX we met did that to their cat. Used is for coastal Cruising and when they settled for good in Barra they pulled the rig and setup with a simple solar electric drive.  They cover a decent amount of the area Cruising around in the high season.  I think he used off the shelf trolling motors. The conversion was way cheaper than I thought.

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Nacra hulls are fantastic but designed to be very responsive to crew weight.  That Nacra 6 conversion looks very nice but shows the difficulty of getting the trim perfect.  There might be times like running downhill in bigger waves where that bow -up attitude could be helpful.  Maybe some kind of adjustable trim tabs?

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On 8/18/2020 at 8:46 AM, Raz'r said:

I would love a little commuter that can handle the main SFBay winds in the summer, as I commute from the South Bay to Richmond. It gets gnarly in 2 places, Angel Island to Cityfront, and the Gulf of Candlestick.

We tried a big diesel hog. Nope, that sucked.

In the really nasty I'm totally fine throttling back to 8 knots, but would like to spin around 20 knots in flattish water, at 3/4 RPM limit. I hate running flat out on outboards. They suck fuel, make noise, it's just not fun.

Oh, and it has to keep the passengers dry and comfy.

Nothing overnight needed. 

Woods' "Skoota" is very cool, but is limited in speed to more like 12. That would make the 16NM trip pretty long.

Maybe an old L7 tri?   In between masts, we motored around Coeur d’ Lane on ours with a 2 HP Torqueedo, which was a bit pokey, but if you got rid of the nets, put a 20-25 hp on it might be decent- w/o the rig, really easy to slide the beam down to ~ 8’ for,moorage, make the pins that hold the beams in place more user friendly, the cabin will keep people dry, and the cockpit is Decent sized, comfy and could be modified.  Put some rubber wedges (door stoppers?) on the beams so they don’t go clunk clunk....might work, will need some daggerboard, so it doesn’t  slide sideways too much, the rudder pulls out of the water, there’s an outboard bracket on ours, for example,  that moves up and down etc etc...didn’t Mundt have his in the classifieds?

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That's a great idea. It would have somewhere for the engine and accommodation. Get rid of one ama and it would be even better.

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Hard to believe that there are not any if any ultralight pod powercats for weekend cruising out there. Everything I see out there is way overbuilt with way too many doo dads, cabinets and other worthless shit mounted to them. Simple and light is the key! I am hoping that the weight of the pod/interior, deck and motor fixings will weigh less than all the sailing gear, tramps, winches, crossbeams, etc. If that is achievable a 60hp 4 stroke should move the 36 at a good clip very efficiently. Thanks for  those nice videos of smaller cats, it gives me inspiration of what is possible when  things are kept simple and light.

I like to keep all the gear I take with me in plastic storage boxes so I can easily take it off the boat after every time out. Much like going camping. That really pairs down all the other shit you don't need. Keep it simple.

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I know I already said this, but that underwing is going to be a buzz killer. I just can't picture it working. The house looks small to me, so I don't think it would look bad if it was higher and longer. It seems like it should serve your needs as a floating home. Just my two cents and I hope you aren't offended.

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22 hours ago, Russell Brown said:

That's a great idea. It would have somewhere for the engine and accommodation. Get rid of one ama and it would be even better.

Thanks. Say the engine pod is on the port side of the middle hull, which ama would you axe?  Would you guess some sort of buoyancy pod needed?  (Asking for a friend....:)). 

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Given that you need a strong transom,  and it would be nice to float the motor into position, the motor sled starts to look like a small hydro. Dual use?

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Hi Billy Bob, long time.  Afterburner (52x30) had a single 20 hp in a center pod.  Motored at 7.5 knots in flat water no headwind.  Maneuverability was ok as long as you have flow over the rudders.  But she ventilated terribly going into waves.  Bows pitched, trough passed under motor, and you listened to the rev limiter, on every wave.   Didn't take very big waves to cause this.  We tried the longest shafts to little avail.  We day dreamed about a floating sled, hull side pods, or in hull placement.  Anything to keep the prop in the water.

Good  luck with your project.

 

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I got talked into a 90hp 4 stroke. by a yacht builder/designer mate of mine. I should be able to throttle way back and save burning much petol.

I am just a few weeks off starting the build as the boat apparently isn't even worth what I paid for it (it has been for sale for a year). This is when it was pile of shit with only the hulls barely useable.

This will be a different beast than a sailing cat.

Certainly had a lot of fun with it over the last 20 years! What a machine it was as a sailboat.

Thanks for sending link to the tornado powercat hannibalhouse.

Thank you for the post above Mr Gibbs.

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