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It does look a lot like an older design I14 and yes, it would be fine as a day sailor for the most part as older 14s were not as powerful as they are today.  

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16 minutes ago, WCB said:

it would be fine as a day sailor for the most part as older 14s were not as powerful as they are today.  

Wind never gets above 5 knots where you are then?

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2 hours ago, JimC said:

Wind never gets above 5 knots where you are then?

It's not about me...ask the OP.  

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It is a low i for teen possibly from before single trapezes were allowed. 

If you made some sails that gave adequate clearance under the main boom and a jib that wasn’t such a godawful Genoa ,t would be a pretty nice boat. About like an Albacore or Jet 14.

its really old stuff. Probably pre 1970.

SHC

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9 hours ago, Steve Clark said:

 

If you made some sails that gave adequate clearance under the main boom and a jib that wasn’t such a godawful Genoa ,t would be a pretty nice boat. About like an Albacore or Jet 14.

it

The Albacore and the Jet 14 are both living examples of Uffa Fox's I-14 design from the 30s. For the Albacore, the hull plan was enlarged by a foot to 15 LOA.  This hull looks to be the exact same shape as either, so likely an old I-14. Many changes to the class since this boat was made.

So, no reason why this wouldn't make a nice day sailor if you put appropriately sized sails on it. It will be more lively than, say, a Flying Scott, but should be manageable. But it is a  planing hull, so expect an adrenaline rush if the wind gets above twelve or so.

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7 minutes ago, Liquid said:

There was short lived OD 14 that looked just like that.

 Yes, I think it looks like a newer type hull than the Jet 14 which was early 1950s IIRC, after they'd ditched the V'd sections along the garboards (á la Thistle).

This looks new enough to my eye that it seems like should have a trap... when did they adopt the single trap? early 1960s? I don't remember the i14s not having a trap but I remember them having singles and a conventional spinnaker with a very long pole.

Kind of a pretty little boat, needs a better trailer though

FB- Doug

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It does look like an older fiberglass I-14 hull, but I'm not an I-14 expert.   I can say definitively that it is not one of the OD-14s (One-Design 14s) made in the late 80s/early 90s.   All of the I-14s I've seen since the 70s were rigged with at least one trapeze and a spinnaker.  Based on the photo, I don't see trapeze wires or rear blocks for spinnaker sheets.  So it may be an older I-14 with the traps and spin gear removed.   Or it might be something similar, but different.

If it is an I-14 hull, it will likely be a fairly tippy dinghy.   With just a main and jib, its manageable, but it all depends on your expectations.  If you can sail a 420, FJ, or any other conventional, popular small dinghy well, then this boat will likely be a bit more challenging, but will be do-able, and be significantly faster.   If, on the other hand, you are fairly new to sailing, or your experience is solely in keelboats, I'd predict that you will find this dinghy quite a handful.

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2 hours ago, MrSwordfish said:

So, no reason why this wouldn't make a nice day sailor if you put appropriately sized sails on it. 

A friend has a 1960s I14 with a National 12 rig on, which is probably around 110 sq feet, and it does make for a nice family boat like that.

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I've used 420 sails (which are also 110 sq ft) on my Albacore when I want to take it easy when it's blowing.  Should work fine for this boat too, and given the ubiquity of college 420s used sails are easy to come by.

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13 hours ago, Steve Clark said:

It is a low i for teen possibly from before single trapezes were allowed. 

If you made some sails that gave adequate clearance under the main boom and a jib that wasn’t such a godawful Genoa ,t would be a pretty nice boat. About like an Albacore or Jet 14.

its really old stuff. Probably pre 1970.

SHC

Agree. It's a 60's I-14 with matching trailer from the same era. Do a water test to identify all leaks and make the boat safe and reliable. With a little effort, you could have a fine performing vessel that would be a pleasure to sail.

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Think it's a Clark built Kirby IV, so around '71 or '72.  Low I measurement, single trap, sym spinnakers that were as wide as they were tall.  This was one of the first designs that could consistently plane upwind, very little rocker and very fine entry.  Was a rocket in its day and looks to be well maintained for its age.  And yes, daggerboards came later.  Brings back a lot of memories of well spent teenage years, getting clobbered in 70+ boat fleets by some dinghy sailing legends!

 

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On 8/19/2020 at 6:59 PM, sosoomii said:

Why does it have a pivoting centreboard? Are daggerboards a relatively new thing?  

A pivoting centreboard allows you to adjust the center of lateral resistance fore and aft making for better control. It will also kick up if you hit something under the water.

The advantage of a daggerboard vs a swing-up centreboard is that it's cheaper to build - you just need a slot rather than a centreboard  trunk.  Laser, sunfish, V15, butterfly, topper etc. have  daggerboards because they were designed a s cheap boats.

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52 minutes ago, MrSwordfish said:

A pivoting centreboard allows you to adjust the center of lateral resistance fore and aft...

The advantage of a daggerboard vs a swing-up centreboard is that it's cheaper to build 

Most of what's talked about lateral resistance is highly dubious. On modern boats the lateral resistance is always distributed between rudder and centreboard and moving the board back is of minimal benefit.

The major advantage of a daggerboard is that its faster.

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1 hour ago, sosoomii said:

So given that a daggerboard is faster and cheaper why would a 14 ever have had a centreboard?  I get that you change the CLR and they are more practical, but when has practical and development class gone hand in hand?

<music>

TRADITION!!! bompa-bomp bomp

<music off>

I think that traditional sailing dinghies back in the 19-teens had centerboards... in fact most of them had metal plate centerboards, AFAIK... and so the guys working at making them faster focused on many other things before somebody had the bright idea to use a daggerboard  instead.

Daggerboards are faster because they have less drag in the slot, and the hull can also either be lighter and/or more rigid without the long slot down the centerline. And they're cheaper too, so everybody is correct!

FB- Doug

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1 hour ago, sosoomii said:

So given that a daggerboard is faster and cheaper why would a 14 ever have had a centreboard?  I get that you change the CLR and they are more practical, but when has practical and development class gone hand in hand?

Because that's how boats used to be.  Of all the older regatta dinghies (on the Chesapeake) I remember from the late 60's early 70's, only the Windwill had a daggerboard.  Sunfish of course also had but they were in a different niche. Then the Laser arrived and shuffled everyone's computer cards about how boats were supposed to work.  

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Ned,

You need to get out more....

Good foil daggerboards got going not too long after WWII....

New designs around that (sort of Spitfire wing) technology supplanted the old quite quickly, remembering that that transition was first away from metal centreplates, with horrible lift properties, the rotating foil centreboards from the 50s (e.g. fd, 470, 505) and then vertical leading edges, probably lead by John Spencer in NZ, from around 1950 as well.

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28 minutes ago, Frogman56 said:

Ned,

You need to get out more....

Good foil daggerboards got going not too long after WWII....

New designs around that (sort of Spitfire wing) technology supplanted the old quite quickly, remembering that that transition was first away from metal centreplates, with horrible lift properties, the rotating foil centreboards from the 50s (e.g. fd, 470, 505) and then vertical leading edges, probably lead by John Spencer in NZ, from around 1950 as well.

Yeah yeah, we know, bow down and worship the southern hemisphere geniuses. What Ned says is quite emphatically TRUTH on the Chesapeake's history. We all knew about those aedeens and the Bermuda Fitted Dinghies and the International 14s etc but the only real development class that had teeth was the moth and the I14 in the Chesapeake. And when I say that, the 14 was always "a few boats" compared to the endless supply of Penguins, Comets, Hamptons, Mobjacks, Snipes, etc etc. Oh ansd the Snipe was Daggerboard in the Depression...so not unknown...but not the prevailing approach.

Yes, there were daggerboards here and there. Come to think of it, I'm trying to remember whether the Duster had one? (Delaware River boat/ NJ mostly).

NJ the sneakbox is often a daggerboard boat way back.... And of course the other duck hunting boats such as the melonseed and ducker often (usually?) had daggers...

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13 hours ago, Ned said:

Because that's how boats used to be.  Of all the older regatta dinghies (on the Chesapeake) I remember from the late 60's early 70's, only the Windwill had a daggerboard.  Sunfish of course also had but they were in a different niche. Then the Laser arrived and shuffled everyone's computer cards about how boats were supposed to work.  

Good Grief! 

Here's a Moth with a daggerboard in 1939 - and they weren't a new innovation even then.

1939_Moth.thumb.jpg.bbeb4d33ff05268c3c9fbfd1d827a334.jpg

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2 hours ago, Frogman56 said:

Ok.

There is now a prize for pic or drawing of the earliest nacaish high aspect use.

I think this involves Mr Penfold

The Boston Cup defence challenge for the '03 cup had a aerofoil keel.. So did RELIANCE who was of coirse the defender.

Also 1/2 raters etc were bulb fin before the turn of the cent,y.

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16 hours ago, fastyacht said:

Yeah yeah, we know, bow down and worship the southern hemisphere geniuses. What Ned says is quite emphatically TRUTH on the Chesapeake's history. We all knew about those aedeens and the Bermuda Fitted Dinghies and the International 14s etc but the only real development class that had teeth was the moth and the I14 in the Chesapeake. And when I say that, the 14 was always "a few boats" compared to the endless supply of Penguins, Comets, Hamptons, Mobjacks, Snipes, etc etc. Oh ansd the Snipe was Daggerboard in the Depression...so not unknown...but not the prevailing approach.

Yes, there were daggerboards here and there. Come to think of it, I'm trying to remember whether the Duster had one? (Delaware River boat/ NJ mostly).

NJ the sneakbox is often a daggerboard boat way back.... And of course the other duck hunting boats such as the melonseed and ducker often (usually?) had daggers...

Obviously the innovation was outside my experience bubble in the early 70's Northern Bay bubble.  Forgot about Snipes but there were none around, there were Moths in Norfolk which was a different Galaxy.  For a development class we had Log Canoes, woo hoo!

The Club's Opti's of course had daggerboards now that I think of it, but there's no room for a centerboard anyway, same as the El Toros that followed.  I do recall seeing the board of a Windmill for the first time and being impressed.  

 

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Fastyacht,

Do you have any construction detail for those pre WWI ?

E.G. foil section, material etc. I did see an old drawing once with cast iron foil and lead bulb from that period

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1 hour ago, Frogman56 said:

Fastyacht,

Do you have any construction detail for those pre WWI ?

E.G. foil section, material etc. I did see an old drawing once with cast iron foil and lead bulb from that period

Hart Nautical Collection at MIT?

Herreshoff Museum?

Some of this is now online accessible.

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