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Refurb 1988 Moody 376


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Well I took the plunge from small boat to big boats.   Target date for being ready to use is March 1.    going to be a wild ride with lots of uplifting moments and likely just as many "what was I thin

Busy day,  second coat of AF went on and then I pulled the painters tape off. Nice clean lines.  I also went with the intention of cutting the window openings for the new windows and get that project

Put the cove and cabin stripes on.   Went to install the zinc on the hull. And it went poorly.   Ended up having to cut the nuts off and drive the studs out, then Rebed new ones.  Also installed the n

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I thing the bigger ones look good too - bit of a Bob Perry vibe going on.

My boat has similar shaped ports which I'm switching from a white plastic frame to a surface mount. In my case, making the ports bigger give the boat a horrific scraped out eyeball kind of look, so I'm painting some "faux" frames on the plexi to maintain the original lines. In your case I think you're fine without, but it's an option.

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Recently finished - so far as one can ever be said to finish - refurbishing my own 1988 Moody 376, bought a little while back. Many of your problems sound familiar, particularly the rats-nest wiring. I had no problems with woodwork, but the ancient Thornycroft T80 engine proved unreliable and difficult to get spares, so the final job was to dump it and fit a modern replacement.

High ballast ratio means a very steady, if not too fast, boat to sail. There is a very active Moody Owners Association in the UK which could help a lot with detailed problems.

Coco.jpg.03d1c82d793d67b53724c8d716aabda5.jpg                                                        

P.S. Those are the original 1988 sails, now replaced!

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10 hours ago, Marcjsmith said:

I’m guessing the employee was paid based on much silicone they used on a daily basis...

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Nah,  just done by someone who had been sleeping under the drip!

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1 hour ago, TUBBY said:

Nah,  just done by someone who had been sleeping under the drip!

just seems like if someone did take it apart and goop it all up and put it back together...  that much silicone would have  kept more of the water out.   So now  If I can get the outer frame cleaned,  getting all the old silicone out is going to be an exercise as well.

I wont be back at the boat until next week.   when I can do more hull work, and start refitting the marelon seacocks and raw water strainer, bilge pump. 

But I'm also going to take a long level with me  and play with the window cutouts.  See if I can mark up the opening a bit and figure out where the new cuts are going to be so I can clean up the wavy cuts from the factory. such that if I decide to ditch the frames  I have some plan in place.  I may just take the old window frames dry fit them in place and trace the outline inside and out to provide a visual reference.  If I cut,  Id like to cut all the old screw holes out, which means the opening may grow by about 1/4 to 1/2" inch all the way around, but it means that all the long edges would be much straighter, which would make for a much easier session making interior trim.

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The usual scenario is that you find huge amounts of hardened goop, often crammed in from outside the leak, adhering to a layer of dirt on the inside.

This will obviously never seal. No amount of goop will leak-proof a dirty surface! Why is that so-o hard for boat workers and Dreaded Former Owners to figure out? Is cleaning REALLY that hard?!? (looks out window at boat in back yard) never mind. Yes. Cleaning is -really- hard........

FB- Doug

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so I spent a few hours working on the frames.  with no  success at easily removing the tape/residue from the exterior of the frames  I did remove the plexiglass from the frames and put the frames back together to make it easier to work with and to not lose any parts.

Honestly, looking the original frames, there are so many points of potential failure for the windows to leak. Goop up enough sealant make sure the plexi is spaced and sealed properly in the frames, then use 24 screws to join the three frame pieces together, while still keeping the plexiglass centered, then take another 50 screws goop up the outer frame, center it in the cabin opening and then screw the outer frame to the inner frame clamping the two frames together. Then do that 3 more times.   All the while hoping all of the goop stayed put with all of the handling.

This thinking really helped push I'm going to go frameless  i have the vhb tape, and I have the dow 795  I will take the old frames trace outlines on the cabin inside and out. Then trim the opening to remove all the screw holes and straighten up the crooked factory cuts to make the window openings symmetrical port and starboard. Then make a diagram of the windows in cad and then have them cut out to size 1 1/8” larger to give me 1” for the tape and 1/8” for the Dow

I’ll definitely  make a jig so I can cut a horizontal straight line. But what’s the best tool for cutting the glass/gelcoat figure a jig saw with a fence would work, but on the up stroke it would likely start chunking the gel coat. Unless I precut the gelcoat . What about one of those oscillating tools, dremel?

Thoughts

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48 minutes ago, Marcjsmith said:

I’ll definitely  make a jig so I can cut a horizontal straight line. But what’s the best tool for cutting the glass/gelcoat figure a jig saw with a fence would work, but on the up stroke it would likely start chunking the gel coat. Unless I precut the gelcoat . What about one of those oscillating tools, dremel?


Thoughts

An abrasive router will work well. the harder the better. This will give you a clean edge.

https://www.toolstoday.com/diamond-coated-fiberglass-carbon-fiber-material-flush-trim-router-bits.html

Dust suppression matters.

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1 hour ago, Marcjsmith said:

I’ll definitely  make a jig so I can cut a horizontal straight line. But what’s the best tool for cutting the glass/gelcoat figure a jig saw with a fence would work, but on the up stroke it would likely start chunking the gel coat. Unless I precut the gelcoat . What about one of those oscillating tools, dremel?

I've had good luck cutting through masking tape - tape the cut area, mark the cut on the tape and then use a fine tooth blade in a jigsaw.

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19 hours ago, pironiero said:

How to get notification from this thread?

right side of the page next to the thread title,  there is a clickable box that you can click on and follow the thread and get notifications when stuff is added

 

to that end,  I went over to the boat after work yesterday for a couple hours.  just wanted to hop on board before the rain today and make sure it was buttoned up.  no water in the bilge after ten days with maybe an inch of rain.  supposed ot get two more inches today.     

I tried the franmar 670  AF remover gel  on the rudder after a 2 hour soak, a surprising amount of paint scraped right off probably easily 4-5 layers leaving a couple layers behind.  took 5 minute to slather it on, and another five to scrape. 

plan on Saturday morning is to slather up the entire hull, and stick some plastic to it so it stays moist longer  and let it set for 6-8 hours while i tackle other projects and scrape it before I leave for the day.

bow light was working,  ran new wires from the gland/plug fitting and now its not working.  took apart the plug and no power at the plug.  but Ive got power at the beaker panel.  ran out of time so I buttoned it all back up and its now back on  the to-do list.  argh...

so I was trying to get dry storage that's about 15 minutes form home to save on the hours drive each way right now.  no dice.  Marina said no, so the rush to put the boat in the water before the end of November and move it close to home is not on the table anymore.

got the price for the upholstery work.  ugh.  I might be building a sewing room in my basement...

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21 hours ago, Marcjsmith said:

got the price for the upholstery work.  ugh.  I might be building a sewing room in my basement...

Maybe worth shopping around, to more remote areas than yours.  Maybe online?

I built a sewing area, mainly for protective canvas items and ad hoc repairs. Doing really good cushion upholstery work (unless your cushions are only rectangular) would be a real learning experience. You'd probably get the hang of it by the last complex-shaped cushion.

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9 minutes ago, Israel Hands said:

Maybe worth shopping around, to more remote areas than yours.  Maybe online?

I built a sewing area, mainly for protective canvas items and ad hoc repairs. Doing really good cushion upholstery work (unless your cushions are only rectangular) would be a real learning experience. You'd probably get the hang of it by the last complex-shaped cushion.

most of the cushions are rectangles... or triangle for the V berth.  the  backrests are a bit more complex.  with the curved bolstered backrest. Not my boat pictured

 figure if I had to,  I could go with plain rectangular or slightly wedge shape  and just by new foam for the backrests.  All the existing foam is  in good shape.

Yeah I am asking around.  I got a friend that's done some seamstress type work,  trying to talk them into the project.  Figure if I'm going to give money to someone  might as well give to someone I know.  all of the material on the cushions is shot,  but good enough that I can use for patterns.

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I made a 5 gallon bucket of lye paste to strip my bottom this past spring.  Lots of tutorials online for the recipe.  Mine was with corn starch and lye granules, done with a seafood boiler in the boatyard parking lot.  I rolled it on and used plastic sheeting to keep it moist.  A tip I've seen others do that probably would have been easier and safer is to add a bunch of sugar to the mix for the hygroscopic qualities, meaning less need to cover with the plastic.  I allowed mine to sit overnight, and the next morning I was done by 11.  I scraped with one of these https://www.amazon.com/Warner-Stainless-Steel-Scraper-10737/dp/B00O5GNF4S/ref=asc_df_B00O5GNF4S/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=193184886406&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=505349727508377057&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9009782&hvtargid=pla-308097996219&psc=1 on a pole, and then pressure washed.  I wore full tyvek and a 3m full face respirator.  Eye protection is absolutely without fail required.  A small bit of lye to the eye and you're possibly blinded.  I had several layers of old paint that came off very well, could not have been more pleased, and this was way way way better than sanding.

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2 hours ago, GMiller said:

I made a 5 gallon bucket of lye paste

The 670 is soy based  so I felt pretty comfortable that it wasn't going chew on the gel-coat.  It came recommended by another guy working on a boat beside me.  Also felt tat its a fairly "natural-ish" alternative and that it wasn't going to chew up my skin or other body parts.  so I'll lay the tarps down and let the glop fall down when I scrape and collect  my paint.  so  so much easier than sanding.

Maybe I'll set up a time lapse video tomorrow  doing one side of the boat.

 

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

If it will chew up bottom paint it will chew up your skin and especially your eyes

Yeah I know. But I don’t think it’s near as bad as some of the more caustic crap.  

this isn’t the worst stuff I’ve had around my body.   Malathion  chlordane, orthene, lindane and other organophosphate pesticides, and I’ve probably handled several hundred gallons Of roundup, 24d, dicamba.  

im honestly surprised my daughter doesn’t have 12 toes 

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On 10/9/2020 at 7:54 AM, fstbttms said:

Not true. Plate anodes are very common on fiberglass boats. Primarily powerboats but they are used on some sailboat models as well.

Given the age of the boat, I wonder if that was once the ground plane for a SSB. 

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On 10/31/2020 at 12:20 AM, SloopJonB said:

Probably explains why you're rebuilding a big boat.

Well it could be one of the reasons my thought process is fucked....

so we have a new blue tooth stereo and speakers.  Nice to have music on the boat. Had to run a new wire for the bow light from the pulpit to the circuit board.  Which necessitated removal of the cabinets to get access to the wires which were not being cooperative from a pulling point of view.  Did one coat of stripper and a couple hours of scraping.  Probably got ten years of paint off the hull on Saturday  

reinstalled raw water pump with proper gaskets, installed bilge pump, ran wires and tested manual operation. and ran bilge hose.   Rained today so was stuck to indoor work 

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3 hours ago, TJSoCal said:

Yeah, but what's on there obviously isn't the original...

Bronze lasts almost forever underwater, and ground plates are mounted flush to the hull. Mount bolts are integral with the plate, no exposed bolts/nuts. So that skin fitting was never a ground plate

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day 20 something on the refit....  the nuts on the zinc mounting bolts are pretty frozen, been soaking with PB blaster for a while  with no joy.  I ran out of dremel discs to cut the nuts.  but I did cut the flanges on the old zinc and remove them to get them out of the way.    scraped the rudder clean,  installed the two marelon thruhull/seacock,  installed the new raw water strainer for the  engine.

also spent some time on the windows.   i took the old frames to the boat and traced outlines inside and out  in an effort to determine whether or not I decide to cut  the cabin and where to cut.

as you see on the pics,  the outline is the extent of the old frame  I used the old frame as the basis for my CAD drawing, so my window shape will be based on the frame and since the frames comparing from port/starboard are the same dimensions, within a 1/16", which IMO is close enough for me to not have to make a separate diagram for each window. 

Since the factory cut edge  is crap i need to straighten/clean it up before I apply my VHB tape, but I also need to find a consistent measurement  for the purposes of making windows.  I did find that the screw holes through the  frame are a fairly consistent 5/16" away from the outer edge.  Theoretically,  I could use the screw holes in the GRP as my guide and  and it would allow me to use my existing frame as a diagram for the new windows.  the window opening will grow on average by 1/4" all the way around.

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Work continues.  I have finally realized that I am not cut from a suitable cloth that would allow me to sand the hull on my boat..  three hours in on saturday.  I called it quits.  The stripper was working,  but is also a PITA to do. collection of the goop and paint, walking around get the goop and paint on your tyvek suit, slipping on said paint goop on the plastic tarp,  basically looking and feeling like  no less than 100 smurfs ejaculated onto you.  So I'm going to get professional assistance to finish. 

I now have a functioning anchor light, functioning deck light, functioning steaming lights and functioning running lights (bow and stern)  the Boat has a masthead tricolor, which is not operating.  All are incandescent bulbs utilizing fixtures/supplies that where NIB on the boat when purchased.  (except the masthead tri/anchor, I haven't been up the mast yet,  I was just able to get the wiring sorted at the gland fitting/bus bar in the cabin),  moving forward as things beak, i would likely replace with an LED counterpart.  had to run a new wire from cabin top to steaming light, which also included a new gland fitting.

I was able to get the Rudder position sensor and linkage mounted wire run back to the raymarine smartpilot computer

Finally got the electrical (120v) outlets sorted and working.  ended up replacing all of them.  wasn't sure what was happening but sometimes the outlets would work fine.  but others times,  the main breaker would trip as would the GFI on the shore side outlet.  could not find any rhyme or reason for the varied functionality  so replacement was cheap.  Damn builders don't leave much wire to make the connections.  We'll see over time if the problems comes back.

Ran air lines for the Tank Tender system for water tanks and diesel tank and installed in the water tank.  Ran out of time  to drill and tap the fuel tank.

installed a 4" waterproof access port into each water tank such that it should make cleaning/inspecting  the tanks somewhat bearable.

Also tried cleaning some of the interior wood with a water, TSP and ammonia solution.  didn't do much,  but every time I wiped it down   the towels went from clean to dirty,  so maybe its just a slow process.

will be on the boat next Saturday with Dad, and we'll knock our heads around the window debacle. and maybe next week start hauling some of the roof panels back to the boat. 

and start looking at the refrigeration system, hvac systems, propane

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Are you spritzing the cleaning solution or wiping with towels wetted with it?

Spritzing is the only way to go at this stage. Get it wet - the gunk should run off like a baseball player just gobbed tobacco juice on it.

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I was doing just this, yesterday. I found the warm water made a difference (I had to boil some on the stove), then gave it a good scrubbing with a scotchbrite pad. I didn't bother with ammonia, just TSP and water. I think the slightly abrasive scotchbrite pad really helps get through the built up oil/gunk.

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Visited the boat with wife, daughter, mom and dad.   This is the first time they all have seen the boat.  There have been pictures, but that only goes so far.  Got the thumbs up....

alos noticed something. On the window front.  I’m thinking that I’m going to have to reuse the frames.   The vertical curvature of the cabin is NQR. Specifically the lower edge of the window opening.   As I get closer to the fore/aft end of the window opening, it becomes manageable, but I don’t think the vhb tape is going bridge the gap, nor do I think that the plexi would bend  enough over the span to make adequate contact for a good bond..

going to take the frames to the company that’s soda blasting my hull,  see what they think about cleaning them....

C26AD99F-C04C-416B-B86C-96F9EFF3AF7E.jpeg

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What about stacking the tape along the bottom edge? We install 1/4” plexi windows on smaller bots with 3/8 wide tape and once the Dow 795/Sika 295 has set up, you can’t even kick them out of you tried — so I wouldn’t be too stressed not having a 100% contact across the 1” tape. 
 

What thickness of plexi are you using? Between some flex in the plastic and the give in the tape, it might not be so bad.

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Will, 1/4”. There is a slight curve fore aft,  maybe 1” over 3’

i don’t think the the plexi will flex in both directions. The up/down span is only about 6”

Honestly, i thought about cutting the 1” wide down to 1/2” putting that down, and then going with 1” over the top to give me a beveled tape edge on the lower edge,    But it seemed kinda sketchy.

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28 minutes ago, andykane said:

You could skip the tape and just use 795. You'll want a 1/4" thickness or so, which will let you adjust for the weird angle. 

I was thinking tape plus a bit of the 795.  I was hoping to not have to screw the frames Down, using the tape to hold it down.  Without the tape, I don’t think I have any easy way to hold the window in place against the curvatures unless I screw it down.

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How far are you planning on extending the new plexiglas over the fiberglass? From your picture, it looks like if you limit it to about where the old frames extended to, the deflection between top and bottom might not be as bad.  

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15 hours ago, Marcjsmith said:

I was thinking tape plus a bit of the 795.  I was hoping to not have to screw the frames Down, using the tape to hold it down.  Without the tape, I don’t think I have any easy way to hold the window in place against the curvatures unless I screw it down.

With 6mm plexi it shouldn't take much pressure at all to bend it 1" over 3'. I wouldn't try to get any vertical bend - just let the 795 accommodate any difference in the cabin side angle). I would do something like this:

- Strip of masking tape below window. Hot glue a few small blocks of wood to the tape to support bottom edge at correct height.
- Use a narrow strip of foam weather stripping around the opening to give you the correct gap (~1/4", based on the 3' window length), and stop the 795 from gooping into the boat.
- Place the port in position, and use a couple sticks to the toe rail to get the fore/aft bend. Shouldn't take much pressure at all. Make sure all the alignment looks good.
- Remove, and apply the goop.
- Place back in position
- Leave the blocks and sticks in position for a couple days (795 cures slowly), then remove it all and let it sit for a couple more weeks before you stress it.

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I like the window treatments you show in Post 99 too.  For bottom painting, try that upper blue bootstripe at about 4" and see if it reduces the apparent freeboard.  You could increase the red stripe to about the same as well.  I think X-Yachts does something similar (3 stripes) on their hulls to reduce the apparent freeboard.

I just checked a couple of pics of X-Yachts and some of their boats have cove stripes as well.

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Andy

what if I doubled up the the vhb on the inside to act like weatherstripping to the get the thickness, all the way around.  Apply 795 outside of the vhb tape. Place window on cabin using your glue/tape block method. The vhb tape along with some wooden sticks would hold the windows in place while the 795 sets up 

no good news from the soda blaster.  He’s not confident that the soda blaster would have much affect on the old packing tape/adhesive/silicone stuck on the frames...  

worked on reassembling some of the v berth roof panels.  Did some cleaning in the engine bay and also tried cleaning the interior teak with tsp and warm water.  Didnt do too much as I think the discoloration is more moisture related ugliness rather than just dirt.   Which means some painting of teak might be in my future  

shower drain pump works,   Fresh water supply pump does not.

The converted ice box 12v refer  not working, not a deal breaker, as it’s well insulated, has a drain, so it would Still work as an icebox 

120v hvac appears to be working.  Won’t know for certain until it get in the water though.

 

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We are cooking with gas....  stove and oven work, the electric shutoff works.

drilled a new hole in the hull for the electric bilge pump.  The boat now has a working manual pump and working electric pump.

Mounted all the hoses to the new seacocks and double clamped.

the zantrax charger is working fine but the inverter is not, but it’s not hooked up either,  time to break open the install guide. And figure out where the wires go...

there is no switch for the hot water heater, so I gotta trace those wires to figure out that conundrum 

so it looks like it may be time to start working on the interior beautification.  

Aft cabin mattress....is there any reason to not consider a foam “bed in a box” so I can trim it to fit? 

 

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23 hours ago, Marcjsmith said:

We are cooking with gas....  stove and oven work, the electric shutoff works.

drilled a new hole in the hull for the electric bilge pump.  The boat now has a working manual pump and working electric pump.

Mounted all the hoses to the new seacocks and double clamped.

the zantrax charger is working fine but the inverter is not, but it’s not hooked up either,  time to break open the install guide. And figure out where the wires go...

there is no switch for the hot water heater, so I gotta trace those wires to figure out that conundrum 

so it looks like it may be time to start working on the interior beautification.  

Aft cabin mattress....is there any reason to not consider a foam “bed in a box” so I can trim it to fit? 

 

No that should be comfy... but those tend to trap moisture under them, so get one of those air-it-out pads. They're about 3/4" thick, can't remember the name

FB- Doug

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16 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

No that should be comfy... but those tend to trap moisture under them, so get one of those air-it-out pads. They're about 3/4" thick, can't remember the name

FB- Doug

i think this is the stuff.  or at least one version of it...

https://www.defender.com/product.jsp?id=1818021

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18 minutes ago, Marcjsmith said:

i think this is the stuff.  or at least one version of it...

https://www.defender.com/product.jsp?id=1818021

Yes, that's it... or very close. Makes a big difference!

I was reminded by Mrs Steam that the trawler cushions were a fashion disappointment in her exalted opinion. The Sunbrella fabric "felt tough" and tended to pill. I thought they were fine, they certainly didn't fade or show wear spots or gather clumps of dog hair (we cruised with a dog) so those were my priorities. We slept on cotton sheets, not bare on the mattress covers!

FB- Doug

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another good day....  I think I got the hot water heater working.....  when I turn on the switch  it draws a few amps.  Won't really know until spring once I get water in it.

got more of the pesky 30 year old self adhesive Velcro residue off the seat/seat backs in the salon., thats a chore, especially trying to to it without damaging the wood

Almost done with prep work in the aft cabin to get ready for paint.   have the boot stripe completely removed, and the waterline stripe about 50% removed.  Hopefully the A/F will come off in  week or two and maybe I'll get some nice painting weather.

not sure if I'm going to go back with the red W/L stripe and then a space and then a boot stripe.   I honestly believe that based on the "scum line" from long time ago the red line is about 3-4" above the scum line I like the idea of a 1" or so gap between the top of the A/F and then a 3-4" wide stripe. and then a complimentary stripe below the  toe rail.  took detailed measured from the toe rail to the red stripe on both sides of the boat.  most where dead on.  some were 1/8" difference.

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all playing with the pvc bead board as a headliner.. with the planks running fore aft.  also considering port/stbd  but haven't made any cuts yet to fit.  will also need to consider how to layout the battens to hide edges/screws

beadboard foreaft.jpg

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14 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Do Not run that "bead board" transversely.

It would look the same as laying a teak deck or cabin sole transversely.

meaning it would make my fat girl look even fatter.  I agree that it probably would look "NQR" 

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38 minutes ago, Israel Hands said:

FIFY before the boss reads your post and comes at you with a frying pan

Meh.  we are a family of large boned individuals.  we embrace the suck.  but thanks just the same.  she has started referring to the boat as my mistress though.

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Getting the ceilings up and the lights hung proper help provide me with some evidence of progress and it helps get some of the bits out of the house.  It also allows to start getting an idea as to what to do with the wood bits.    I need to clean the area up real good and take some photos so I can play around with photo shop.  And colors.  The fuel injection pump and fuel lines went back in with out much fanfare.  Waiting for some gaskets and rubber bits to put the heat exchanger back in  so I can fire bleed the fuel lines and fire it up again to make sure I fixed the fuel leak.

 Got the new fresh water(potable) pump reinstalled.  Still need to scrub the tanks but at least  now I can easily pump out the tanks.

Still a long way from home.  But every visit puts me closer, even if it’s just to piddle around and clean up the dust.

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2 hours ago, ropetrick said:

 really like the ships bell and it's ropework.

That’s the previous owners.   I may remove it and mount it to a block of wood polish it up and get it engraved and send it to him as a momento of sorts...

 

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23 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

No kidding - that looks like a fresh roll & tip job.

though about using paint, but figured the time was better spent with a $50 orbital buffer from harbor freight and lots of beer.   new rubrail on order.

been cutting my teeth on gelcoat repair on the dink as well.  trying to get technique down before i toss in color match.  still have a way to go.  so by the time weather breaks and I'm able to spend time working on gelocat repairs on the big boat, I'll be a pro...Ha.

i need to bring my dremel back home from the boat so I can chase out the small cracks and get a nice edge for the repair to bite into.    Id rather learn on the small boat

 

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Well I made decision.  Gutted the aft cabin removed all the plywood sheeting. Gave it a good scrubbing, and am going to replace the sheeting with the pvc beadboard.

going to remove the horizontal furring strips and epoxy in vertical strips for the beadboard to attach to.  The aft will is going to be painted to match the walls.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Cal20sailor said:

You're  keeping this boat!  Labor of love.

Putting it up for sale was  never really going to be my idea.

Glad I pulled the luan out.  of the aft cabin.  three of the 4 pieces were fine, but one piece  which was behind some cabinets was pretty gross.  with the luan intact,  I've got enough were I can make some decent patterns.  So more work at home which is nice, rather than trying to have a wood shop setup outside the boat in the cold.  one of the benefits of taking out the old luan and i picked up a bunch nice clean wood for trim  that was attached to the luan as horizontal decorative strips. 

if the pvc bead board works out  then it could pave the way for the V berth for a similar application.

While i was looking for slips,  one of the marina's I looked at offered me a sailboat for free.  I told the guy,  last thing I need right now is another project.

I'm likely going to use that marina for my slip and I'm halfway considering talking to the guy again to get more info about the boat and maybe work up a deal were  if I can help him get rid of the boat, maybe I get a discount on slip fees.  its floating,  he's got the title in hand, about a 40',  hes a self proclaimed powerboat/fishingboat guy and doesn't know jack about sailboats.

 

before pics

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epoxied the wall supports in place.  Had a couple heaters going to get a nice warm temp in the aft cabin.  Used west 105/205  with some 403 to thicken it up  fill gaps and reduce sagging

added some telescoping sun shade poles to hold/wedge things in place while it sets up.   Could not leave heaters running while I’m not on the boat. So we’ll see how it all looks on Tuesday. 

Also finally got the rubber bits for the heat exchanger to reinstall that, but my exhaust hose between the muffler/manifold was to long and I wasn’t able to bolt it all together.  And didnt have my dremel onboard to trim the hose.

 

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I like the battens to hold interior panels. Those will hold a nice curve matching the hull. The kerfs in the wood will become gross over time but that will be hidden. I've used smaller pieces of wood or soft plastic, gorilla-glued into place. Holds the panels but more limited in where you can fasten stuff in place and doesn't hold as nice & smooth of a curve.

They tell me the gorilla glue will let go in ~20 years. Considering I started using it about 10 years ago, I may have to re-consider

Looks great

FB- Doug

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I was contemplating tabbing in the battens on the extreme end of being anal, or brushing on some thinned epoxy or spar varnish to seal up the bare wood after it all sets up,  To help minimize the chance of any rot.

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Stbd side hung  the black oxide screws will not remain.  Still not sure if I’m going to  I stall screw covers or dab some white paint on some stainless screws  but fore and aft edges will have trim to cover and for accent 

 Also got the heat exchanger installed 

 

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Damn cold day today.  Boat was moved to the blasting pad.  First time it’s been moved in 5 years.   Didn’t do much today, hard to stay motivated and focused with your teeth chattering. 

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That explains why I didn't see your boat where I thought it should be. I swung out to to a bit of winterizing and dropped by HHN yesterday to see if you were there and say hi. 

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  • 3 weeks later...

sorry for the lack of updates.  not much has been happening  cold weather and snow,  and much of what i'm doing or need to do i need warmer temps.

started working on interior cushions making patterns, ect. at home

was able to get to the boat yesterday afternoon and make up my fiberglass corner pieces for the aft cabin.  it was 50 outside,  plus the space header  got us up to 70 in the cabin.

two layers of 6"wide 6 ounce fiberglass tape,.  I used packing tape on the surfaces as my release agent, and had some peel ply on top.  the puckers you see is the peel ply, not the glass  it was tacking up nicely when I left the boat hopefully i'll be able to pull it apart this weekend and start the sanding and trimming and painting.

on the plus side,  my boat is next in the que line to get blasted.  which means likely some time next week, given the snow we are foretasted to get.

I should be picking up my windows this week as well.

 

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She’s naked.  Or nearly so.  They kindly put a couple coats of fresh coat of primer on the keel to stop any surface rust and they came in under budget 

Well my free mattress didn’t work out  the way I had hoped  it wasn’t a complete foam  it had an thin innerspring Sandwiched between two layers of foam    
 

so  do I compound and wax the hull  above the WL before I paint the anti foul  or wait until after I paint.  Biggest fear is getting wax and compound on the gelcoat and not cleaning it and ending up with poor paint adhesion  

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17 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Polishing & waxing is the last step before launching.

I was hoping to try to take advantage of cooler weather not suited for painting, but ok for buffing.  

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winch question. I have 3  lewmar 16's on the mast(non self tailing).  with lewmar 43 self tailing for the for jib sheet duty

none of the halyards come back to the cockpit, maybe one day in the distant future,  but not today

the winch for the main halyard has one of the barton marine rubber self tailing donuts on it  not sure what i'm in for there, but well see.  I am aware that for those to work, the entire winch needs to have wraps on it before you put it in the self tail

Given that Id likely be up raising the main on my own (furling genoa),  and knowing how much easier it is sheeting the sails in with a self tailing winches, might it be be significantly easier to do so with a proper self tailing winch at the mast?

any reason to not consider putting a self tailing winch up there?

I would only put self tailing  for the main halyard.

 

 

 

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27 minutes ago, Marcjsmith said:

any reason to not consider putting a self tailing winch up there?

I would only put self tailing  for the main halyard.

 

 

 

I would go with an it depends.

I going back to sailing my fathers Moody 29 for this, but we also had the winch on the mast with no self tailer. You are basically taking up the weight of the main plus friction from the sliders/bolt rope.  We had sliders, so no messing around trying to feed the bolt rope and not too much friction. I could hoist most of the sail without the winch, then a few wraps to make the winch act as a ratchet let me banjo above and take in slack behind  (with the right body position you ate kind of rocking back and forth using body weight to do most of the work), maybe a final crank if needed to get it to the mark. The tension was on the Cunningham not the halyard.

If you expect to have to wind it all the way, then self tailers may be better, but personally I would try to get set up so you don't have to.

 

 

 

 

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IMO self tailers are always better than standard winches. If you have some obscure situation where self tailing is not wanted then don't use it - they will work as standard winches any time you want.

If you are going to the trouble and expense of converting to self tailers then I'd take the opportunity to change the halyard to go back to the cockpit. A new winch will almost certainly require new mounting hols and you don't want another handful of holes in the same area on the mast.

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john,  once the boat gets in the water I can think about going up the stick and cleaning the track as well.  figure 7 years of non use a good cleaning/lube is warranted.  in the mean time  I might try to fabricate a track cleaner using some ropes/rags, ect. just need to make sure that whatever I make  comes down and doesn't get stuck in the track.

Jon the winches are mounted to dedicated plates  so at the worst id have to drill new holes in the mounting plate, unless the lewmar 16 self tailing has the same mounting holes, then its "plug-n-play"

as much as Id like to have the halyards run aft to the cockpit,  the 376 has a fiberglass spray shield, which means I'd have to make a tunnel through it for the lines to pass, it does open to the cabin areas  below so it would need to be water tight as well.  it has been done,  here's a pic of one.  Its doable, but not in the cards right now...

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This is going on the assumption on a boat this size you are leaving the main on the boom and not feeding the slugs every time you raise it. In that case raising the sail is a pretty simple one man job. Although a self tailing winch would be still be good, most days you will only use it once. I suspect from a time and budget standpoint there may be other priorities.

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Steele,  

the main will be stored on the boom with the slugs in the track.   Not that much of a masocist to remove the main each time.

its a boat,  there will always be other stuff to spend money on.  Just thinking out loud more than anything.  I can keep an eye on the used winch market for something to come up.   If I ever get the lines run aft,  could just move the winch aft.  

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Makes sense. A self tailer on the mast is nice as it frees up your second hand to hold on to something in rough conditions rather than tailing.

My last boat had a spray combing very similar to yours. When the prior owner ran the halyards back to the cabin top he used PVC pipe to run the rope through to the winch. It worked well and trimmed flush looked like it had always been there.

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