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JPK yachts to be built in Australia


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JPK Pacific has established an agreement with the experienced yacht-building specialist Innovation Composites of Nowra, NSW, to have JPK Yachts made in Australia.

In a boost to Australia’s boat building sector, Europe’s most successful IRC racers, the JPK brand, now have that extra appeal of being “made in Australia”.

JPK Pacific’s decision to re- locate to Australia delivers a range of benefits to its customers as well as the economy of the Shoalhaven, NSW.

After an exhaustive selection process across the boat building sector in Australia, Innovation Composites of Nowra demonstrated the expertise, experience, infrastructure and capability required to produce the super successful JPK range of IRC racers.

Paul Glynn and Mattijs Willenborg of JPK Pacific have the exclusive license for the Asia / Pacific region with their dream of establishing production in Australia now a reality.

Innovation Composites have produced over 100 race yachts that included the legendary Sydney range of 38’s, 40’s and 47’s. Mark Rowed said “We are really excited to be selected to build these proven race winners and believe that the JPKs will feature in fleets throughout the Asia / Pacific region”

JPK Pacific will be introducing the JPK 1080 and JPK 1180 to the market with the first JPK 10.80 to be in the water the first quarter of 2021. Both models are outstanding IRC racers, having won Europe’s major regattas.

The JPK 10.80 “Courier Leon” showed its capability to place second overall on IRC and win Division 4 in the 2015 Sydney Hobart after winning the grueling Fastnet of that year and arriving only a week before the Hobart start.

Paul Glynn said, “The JPK 10.80 is the most versatile yacht on the market, offering owners a podium opportunity after having proved its capability in winning major short-handed and crewed regattas in the UK and Europe. You name it and the JPK 10.80 has won it. Not only a winning record, but in looking at regatta results the JPKs are the dominant brand through the fleet.”

Adding to their outstanding IRC results and now “made in Australia”, the JPKs are the best value for money on the market, said Paul Glynn, adding, “Savings on shipping and associated charges represent an additional customer benefit.”

Mattijs Willenborg commented “Added to the performance capability and now the cost savings we are able to offer buyers the opportunity to inspect the production of their yacht on a progressive basis.”

Being affordable and versatile, the JPKs are described as "a dynamic yachting experience", sailing to their rating on and off the wind, in light or heavy conditions.

Paul Glynn says the functional layout makes the JPKs easy and fun to sail and "when fun turns to winning there are lots of happy owners".

The first JPK 10.80 in Australia, “Atomic Blonde” has just proved that by winning the four-race Winter Series sailed off Fremantle. Owner Dr Simon Torvaldsen said, “The JPKs are a great yacht to sail and perform well to their rating.”

Supporting the Australian boat building sector is a proud achievement for the JPK Pacific team, making the brand easily available to Australian yachting enthusiasts looking for an affordable and competitive option.

 

https://www.mysailing.com.au/boats/jpk-yachts-now-proudly-made-in-australia?fbclid=IwAR0gPyVe7CG_MZwWV2ZmkRHNUqYkOrazbn2tLggIquHiZMRt0UXKpjTz4dA

 

 

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So is that a completely new set of molds or are they getting old ones and JPK F builds themselve new ones? Interesting to see that they target Australia and NZ, but it makes perfect sense, if you don't want to go head to head with J.

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33 minutes ago, Matagi said:

So is that a completely new set of molds or are they getting old ones and JPK F builds themselve new ones? Interesting to see that they target Australia and NZ, but it makes perfect sense, if you don't want to go head to head with J.

The larger JPK range tends to function better also as performance cruisers which makes more sense in Australia/NZ. 

Their booking for 1030 is going to keep them busy for years. 

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2 hours ago, Matagi said:

or are they getting old ones

Molds are good for max 50 boats ,and shipping them a nightmare to keep them square.
So probably new ones.
Looks more like Aus/NZ targeted them. If you run something that is wanted, you get offers from a lot of places. Many of them dodgy on financial strength to really pull it off.
Will not be surprised if the total budget to get started is up to a 1/2 million Euro.

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51 minutes ago, minime88 said:

It was a crack at AS/CYCA cat1 ORC stability requirement for Hobart race, the 10.80 has already competed. A non-issue in this case.

No it was about IRC hull factor. 
 

22.2.1 Hull factor (HF) is calculated by the Rating Authority and is an evaluation of features of the boat and their character and efficiency.


22.2.2 Stripped out interiors, the use of light and hi-tech structures and/or materials, removal of furniture or other fitted equipment, etc. may lead to the application of higher than standard hull factor to compensate for potential increase in performance. Such features shall be declared to the Rating Authority.


22.2.3 The rated Hull Factor assumes that the boat is fitted out at least to the production specification and materials and/or to the condition when last measured/inspected. This does not negate owners’ responsibilities under Rules 8.9, 22.2.2 and RRS 78.1.

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6 minutes ago, Rawhide said:

Good luck to them, I hope they succeed, we need more construction in AUS. Good timing, I think, short handed racing is on a role, would be good to have fleets like they do in NZ. 

x2 

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1 hour ago, SCANAS said:

No it was about IRC hull factor. 

Apologies lydia, my mistake. Thanks SCANAS.

That's pretty curious. So an IRC cert is regional? Or is it a local measurer thing? Or a recently noted anomaly?

Best of luck to JPK Pacific, I hope they do well.

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36 minutes ago, minime88 said:

Apologies lydia, my mistake. Thanks SCANAS.

That's pretty curious. So an IRC cert is regional? Or is it a local measurer thing? Or a recently noted anomaly?

Best of luck to JPK Pacific, I hope they do well.

No I think Lydia means it’s a questionable extra factor determined by the rating agency not the measurer / region. 

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1 hour ago, Rawhide said:

Good luck to them, I hope they succeed, we need more construction in AUS. Good timing, I think, short handed racing is on a role, would be good to have fleets like they do in NZ. 

I guess construction died in the arse when the dollar was heading to parity with the US. Now that its back to a more natural level, it makes sense to start building back here.

Hopefully this is not the last start up.

Perhaps we might not see the resurrection or creation of Aussie brands but more deals like this.

 

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55 minutes ago, The Dark Knight said:

I guess construction died in the arse when the dollar was heading to parity with the US. Now that its back to a more natural level, it makes sense to start building back here.

Hopefully this is not the last start up.

Perhaps we might not see the resurrection or creation of Aussie brands but more deals like this.

 

I am guessing the cost of setting up a whole new brand is many times greater than building existing models under license. Many have tried, few succeed. The GTS boats didn't take off.

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3 hours ago, Rawhide said:

I am guessing the cost of setting up a whole new brand is many times greater than building existing models under license. Many have tried, few succeed. The GTS boats didn't take off.

That's what I was thinking.

Europe has the market place for small brands to start up and develop a name and we don't. Given that we have a FTA with the US, we could also be a good place for Euro companies to build some boats for the US market.

I would imagine that this sort of licence arrangement could be a good way for a few former Aussie Brand boatbuilders to get back into the game, like your local Northshore.

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SH is the only thing with a decent heart beat these days....

.....keep an eye peeled on these and interest in the Solo Tasman Yacht Challenge in April 2022. New Plymouth NZ to Gold Coast Oz.

On the cusp of the trades so SE or NE which is sweet. Nothing in the way except Lord Howe you can't miss but Elizabeth and Middleton Reefs are like fucking magnets. 

Good old cunts tour.  Thinking about either a quick small or a quick but slow bigger with hot water and microwave. :lol:

IMG_20200828_173454.jpg

Not me :lol: a 40' Hanse on Elizabeth.

images - 2020-08-28T172419.187.jpeg

images - 2020-08-28T174222.562.jpeg

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28 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

SH is the only thing with a decent heart beat these days....

.....keep an eye peeled on these and interest in the Solo Tasman Yacht Challenge in April 2022. New Plymouth NZ to Gold Coast Oz.

On the cusp of the trades so SE or NE which is sweet. Nothing in the way except Lord Howe you can't miss but Elizabeth and Middleton Reefs are like fucking magnets. 

Good old cunts tour.  Thinking about either a quick small or a quick but slow bigger with hot water and microwave. :lol:

IMG_20200828_173454.jpg

Not me :lol: a 40' Hanse on Elizabeth.

images - 2020-08-28T172419.187.jpeg

images - 2020-08-28T174222.562.jpeg

Are you off your meds?

You have really gone off topic in a big way. 

23 hours ago, The Dark Knight said:

JPK Pacific has established an agreement with the experienced yacht-building specialist Innovation Composites of Nowra, NSW, to have JPK Yachts made in Australia.

 

 

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50 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

SH is the only thing with a decent heart beat these days....

.....keep an eye peeled on these [SH friendly] and interest in the Solo Tasman Yacht Challenge in April 2022. New Plymouth NZ to Gold Coast Oz...

20 minutes ago, The Dark Knight said:

Are you off your meds?

You have really gone off topic in a big way. 

23 hours ago, The Dark Knight said:

JPK Pacific has established an agreement with the experienced yacht-building specialist Innovation Composites of Nowra, NSW, to have JPK Yachts made in Australia.

 

 

Go look at qualifying distance for this race in 18+ months time... then look at quick SH Oz boats.... you fucking dimwit. One day when you race offshore you might understand....maybe.

Fucking turnip. 

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4 hours ago, The Dark Knight said:

That's what I was thinking.

Europe has the market place for small brands to start up and develop a name and we don't. Given that we have a FTA with the US, we could also be a good place for Euro companies to build some boats for the US market.

I would imagine that this sort of licence arrangement could be a good way for a few former Aussie Brand boatbuilders to get back into the game, like your local Northshore.

That would be a smart way to do it, but only if the licence fee you get from an Australian builder is higher than doing that job yourself after tariffs. 

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33 minutes ago, Jono said:

My last SH Tasman crossing was on a Mini. I'd rather be on a JPK any day, Best of luck and can I have am 11.80 for NZ please?

How long did you take? How about a 4yr old POGO 12.50 $319k available now, you won’t know yourself or which toilet to use! 

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4 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

SH is the only thing with a decent heart beat these days....

.....keep an eye peeled on these and interest in the Solo Tasman Yacht Challenge in April 2022. New Plymouth NZ to Gold Coast Oz.

3 hours ago, The Dark Knight said:

Are you off your meds?

You have really gone off topic in a big way

 

3 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Go look at qualifying distance for this race in 18+ months time... then look at quick SH Oz boats.... you fucking dimwit. One day when you race offshore you might understand....maybe.

Fucking turnip. 

 

Bump...you now gone MIA Hoppy? Useless.

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18 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Scan I'm looking at that..but a fucking heavy 40.. but around $265+k next year market is in the mix..sorry Shaggy. :lol:

5.5t About the same as a SYD38 with a much nicer interior & spare rudder :) 

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3 minutes ago, SCANAS said:

5.5t About the same as a SYD38 with a much nicer interior & spare rudder :) 

A agree with JS, a class40 is around 4.5t with a similar haul shape So big difference off the wind. Also the Pogo12.5 needs a set of working racing sails as the photos of this boat show cruising sails.

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11 hours ago, Rawhide said:

I am guessing the cost of setting up a whole new brand is many times greater than building existing models under license. Many have tried, few succeed. The GTS boats didn't take off.

7 hours ago, The Dark Knight said:

That's what I was thinking.

Europe has the market place for small brands to start up and develop a name and we don't. Given that we have a FTA with the US, we could also be a good place for Euro companies to build some boats for the US market.

I would imagine that this sort of licence arrangement could be a good way for a few former Aussie Brand boatbuilders to get back into the game, like your local Northshore.

3 hours ago, Matagi said:

That would be a smart way to do it, but only if the licence fee you get from an Australian builder is higher than doing that job yourself after tariffs. 

 

What tarriff barriers or non tarriff barriers being regulatory friction you all speak of or maybe worried about???

It's a licence ONLY to a build a boat. Look at US J licence in France and Italy where no Free Trade Agreement between US and EU. Side agreements though.

So that is all it is today. There may be rules of origin requirements in the pending EU-Aust Free Trade Agreement that may or may not allow for really complicated shit like "diagonal cumulation"  etc in trade speak. Please dont ask me to go there. Lots of word salad.

Even that won't change anything.

Good deal good idea. Start punching them out lads.

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5 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

...On the cusp of the trades so SE or NE which is sweet...

IMG_20200828_173454.jpg.aa0efb3e3d447e5ccde5af6a691c2b8b.jpg

22 minutes ago, Chucky said:

A agree with JS, a class40 is around 4.5t with a similar haul shape So big difference off the wind. 

 

Chucky you join a very rare club of people who agree with me. :lol:

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9 hours ago, Chucky said:

A agree with JS, a class40 is around 4.5t with a similar haul shape So big difference off the wind. Also the Pogo12.5 needs a set of working racing sails as the photos of this boat show cruising sails.

Horses for courses. 12.50 has a foot more freeboard than a Class 40. 3m fixed draft around here doesn’t work too well (DK46 & the RP42 certainly didn’t like it too much). I think I’d be looking at the Sayer 12’s for a more race orientated SH / DH boat over a class 40 for around here. 

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18 hours ago, SCANAS said:

How long did you take? How about a 4yr old POGO 12.50 $319k available now, you won’t know yourself or which toilet to use! 

16 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Scan I'm looking at that..but a fucking heavy 40.. but around $265+k next year market is in the mix..sorry Shaggy:lol:

16 hours ago, SCANAS said:

5.5t About the same as a SYD38 with a much nicer interior & spare rudder :) 

16 hours ago, Chucky said:

A agree with JS, a class40 is around 4.5t with a similar haul shape So big difference off the wind. Also the Pogo12.5 needs a set of working racing sails as the photos of this boat show cruising sails.

6 hours ago, SCANAS said:

Horses for courses. 12.50 has a foot more freeboard than a Class 40. 3m fixed draft around here doesn’t work too well.....

 

Here  are the two cruiser racers stacked together the JPK 11.80 and a Shaggys Pogo 12.5 (with S2 hull) Much in the same mould and not light. 11.8 slab keel (good for IRC) and a water ballast option. The Pogo swing-keel a must for bay work.

Then the SH racer the PogoS3 Class 40...might be less freeboard but fucking more comfortable up top than both those two cruiser/racers designed to carry bodies. Also the transom escape tunnel when you plough into Middleton Reef. :lol:

JPK 11.80.  Specs.     Options  Plans

IMG_20200829_133422.jpg.3b1cf29793b7e8b399cd456539e3ba01.jpg52bf89f5-7d33-4273-bcc1-8238bee66560.thumb.jpeg.fcdd1f35f79f0ccd1be0d7f3dbc89f56.jpeg

Pogo 12.5   Brochure

IMG_20200829_134037.jpg.37d6d8364c379c0941db944969ccf871.jpgIMG_20200829_133644.thumb.jpg.580046820b3aa093fd4c02a9530c7dc3.jpgIMG_0672.JPG.375df43e26ce0df35c3859536de6e81c.thumb.jpeg.718fcdc1ecc5719f68967ec062fee85f.jpeg

Pogo S3 Class 40.    Plans

IMG_20200829_133517.thumb.jpg.99eb15f34660ac81f40d4202fdc7be9f.jpgDSC00635-1920x1440.thumb.jpg.bc76a052a3eede18880dd95a16a872c1.jpgPogo-40S3-1-1920x1385.thumb.jpg.1ace6d9030bc112fc8c6a7fed5409e8f.jpg

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On 8/28/2020 at 9:48 PM, jack_sparrow said:

sorry Shaggy.

S'alright mate, each to their own. I got to crawl all over the S3, sweet boat and great visibility whilst staying protected. If you're rich enough to have a race boat and a cruiser it would be awesome. The only bitch I have about them is the lighter we keep pushing them the more unpleasant the motion.

I prefer my boats like my motorcycles though, just as rewarding on casual weekends as on the track. When you can put a kite up and plod along at 15's with this lot on the lay days, I'm pretty comfortable with my choices. 

839714841_P1000143_zpszihtwr6g(2).thumb.JPG.617dd36fdd39cdb0690a9b5bb46cad62.JPG 

 

 

 

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Just now, Varan said:

Guess you never rode motocross. 

Yep, most of my early life, but migrated from 2 stroke to 4 strokes after a few years. The power band on the newer bikes was nuts fun, but some days I just wanted to chill and still go riding.   

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funny how life redirects ya. I loved motocross, and everything about motorcycles, big and small. Somehow, I then ended up in Montana, and it was mountain bicycles big and small. Now, having moved away, I just cannot give up the mountain bikes. I will watch motocross, and relive the dream, but I cannot give up the pedals, and there is only time for one (because sailing consumes the rest).

Sorry for the distraction. I like the dream you are living.

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35 minutes ago, shaggybaxter said:

Yep, most of my early life, but migrated from 2 stroke to 4 strokes after a few years.

31 minutes ago, Varan said:

funny how life redirects ya .I loved motocross..

 

I haven't been to motocross event over 25 years..my first was a 350 Bultaco then always European. Husqvarna were the first 4 stroke in early 80's, not Japanese as many think.

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36 minutes ago, Varan said:

. Did bultaco 250 in trials.

The modern two-stroke trials bike was born in Spain with Bultacos, Montesas and Ossas. They had great everything but quirky motors you had to maintain or they just stopped. The Japanese first arrived with shitty bikes but beautiful motors. The Spanish trials bike reign finally ended when the Japanese fixed that and introduced the single shock. The Japanese art of copying but also going one innovation step further every step was manufacturing masterclass.

Imagine if they had tried that with sailboats.

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Our first dirt bike was a Bultaco 350 :). 
I remember the torque off idle was like nothing I’d ridden , or even since! until the Honda XR’s sorted out some fuel/exhaust aberrations, (the XR500 could beat my ‘76 Z900 off the lights :) )
I swear the Bultaco could climb a near vertical slope. Loved it to bits. 

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Let's get serious ...road.

Kawasaki were the secret cunts of motorcycles in the 70/80's with triples and getting 60 hp out of 500cc from a 2 stroke.They did up to 750cc. Best ignition systems going...and their noise gave blind men a hard on.

Acceleration nothing went fucking close, tire sellers loved them. As a cheap stock bike so they fucking killed more than anyone else combined, usually within 100 metres of a stop light of a pub or university. Even Ducati's V Kwakas was min 2:1 greater Jap dead ratio I reakon and we Italian riders were always stoned...it said that in the brochure.

You fancied a girl whose boyfriend drove a Kwaka 500 then you just waited...he was fucking dead usually by the following Friday night and then she was yours...maybe even banging her at his wake.

The motorcycle wars then were more than about motorcycles. :lol: 

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Yep, the Z9's were another 'too much engine, not enough of everything else' but still couldn't touch the triples. I remember they used to flex horribly, the nickname 'hinge' was well deserved. I had three and crashed each one. 

IMG_0169.JPG.94ef77db05b2824942f44c8e4bae8699.JPG  

The last off hurt too much, so I parked the bikes for a while and stupidly decided this was a good idea to do to my EH. 1mpg at full song, I used to carry a 20 litre drum in the boot so you could drive further than your own suburb.

IMG_E0168.thumb.JPG.2d4c7ecce832323053f3657844afb153.JPG

To own either one now, you need something like this.

If only we knew....

IMG_0179.PNG.10c1c7d5d9930c2689c8991c3eed4d76.PNG 

  

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24 minutes ago, shaggybaxter said:

I remember they used to flex horribly, the nickname 'hinge' was well deserved. I had three and crashed each one. 

 IMG_0169.JPG.94ef77db05b2824942f44c8e4bae8699.JPG

Mate a lot of crashing... If I wasn't there and trying to bang your girlfriend I would have told you the secret to minimising Kwaka ownership costs. That was to make those foot pegs fixed not folding like first Honda 4's.

That got rid of expensive tank damage and you just tucked one leg and one thong up and sat on the crank cover getting giddy until you stopped. :lol:

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anyone want to work there

 

https://www.facebook.com/job_opening/216010506471250/?source=renew_post

 

Operating CNC machine using MDF and other products , Job also requires sanding and finishing CNC machined jobs. Attention to detail is a must.Some experience using fiberglass and resin is a benefit. Night shift work may also required from time to time. 

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16 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Let's get serious ...road.

Kawasaki were the secret cunts of motorcycles in the 70/80's with triples and getting 60 hp out of 500cc from a 2 stroke.They did up to 750cc. Best ignition systems going...and their noise gave blind men a hard on.

Acceleration nothing went fucking close, tire sellers loved them. As a cheap stock bike so they fucking killed more than anyone else combined, usually within 100 metres of a stop light of a pub or university. Even Ducati's V Kwakas was min 2:1 greater Jap dead ratio I reakon and we Italian riders were always stoned...it said that in the brochure.

You fancied a girl whose boyfriend drove a Kwaka 500 then you just waited...he was fucking dead usually by the following Friday night and then she was yours...maybe even banging her at his wake.

The motorcycle wars then were more than about motorcycles. :lol: 

Raced a green streak for a year. Fast when it ran. With Kawasaki at that time, it was a bike, plus a couple of cases of plugs, rings and pistons. But when they ran, they could go. Yamaha, imho, brought reliability to Japanese 2 stroke.

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1 hour ago, Varan said:

Yamaha, imho, brought reliability to Japanese 2 stroke.

Every jap manufacturer bought something to the table at different times. Like Suzuki might have been late to the four-cylinder four-stroke party, but it's air/oil cooling design was the birth of the "sports bike" and a motor that continued unchanged for 2 decades. Even had a sexy name... SACS (Suzuki Advanced Cooling System) and the sleek looking engines looked sexy.

IMO Yamahas moment was 47 years ago last month at Finland's GP and was suspension not fuel/spark. 

1973 World Champion Swedens Hakan Andersson on a "mono-shocked" Yamaha 250.  That was Andersson's and Yamaha’s first motocross world title. The mono then became the standard.

I remember watching people watch mono shocked bikes for the first time scratching their heads wondering why it didn't have any rear suspension. :lol:

The sailing equivalent of Yamaha's moment of more efficient use of power (bikes of keeping driving rear wheel on the track) would be the canting keel.

Interestingly Yamaha are the only bike/motor manufacturer to have built boats AND sponsored an offshore sailing team being Ross Fields W60 in the 1994 Whitbread.

sec_img1_1.jpg

images - 2020-09-01T140005.037.jpeg

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On 8/30/2020 at 11:59 AM, shaggybaxter said:

Not a distraction at all Varan, thread drifts are some of the best parts!

5 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

The sailing equivalent of Yamaha's moment of more efficient use of power (bikes of keeping driving rear wheel on the track) would be the canting keel.

 

Shaggy you shouldn't have said that about thread drifting. :lol:

I'm a big fan of the guys at Facnor, Karver etc who make very serious little but very  important shit.. but I'm not putting it beside the canting keel example.

Taking compression out of the rig sits way south of the Yamaha's mono shock but pretty close to Suzukis oil/air cooled 4 stroke SACS engines. 

This Facnor stuff just after/same time your Pogo came out of the shop Shaggy??? 

 

But you do have Karver clutches which are better than sex for SH sail handling.

images - 2020-09-01T191324.566.jpeg

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3 hours ago, longy said:

Waaay back in 1982 Yamaha designed & built "Super Witch" and we won our class in Clipper Cup with it. They had sponsored a tarted up version of one of their production boats in the previous CC.

Pre internet Yamaha motorcycle dealers got a company newsletter via snail mail/courier to give to their customers.

This Newsletter in 1982 late in the year was 8 pages long... I think the reason that edition is a bit longer is there is a strong post war Japanese/Hawaii connection that was used to drive consumer goods sales/acceptance in the US....yes I know that sounds a bit Pearl Harbour weird. Anyway an opportunity came up.

Longy you made all of page 8 and were famous in the motorcycling world....a lot of bikers and motorcycle dealers around the world scratched their heads saying "what in the fuck is this sailing shit." :lol:

1982 Yamaha News - No 7

IMG_20200901_193439.jpg

IMG_20200901_193512.jpg

IMG_20200901_193548.jpg

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I won't even ask Jack how the hell you managed to keep this stuff, I manage to lose my birth certificate approx every year. 

I was so sick of the poor handling, we grafted a '83 CB1000F Super bold'or front and rear end onto my last Z9. It looked awesome, but I had to fit a dirty great steering dampener on it as if you took your hands off the bars it would tank slap so violently it'd pitch you down the road (which it did). 

  1983-honda-1062cc-cb1100fd-super-bol-drsquoor.thumb.jpg.6bbb2b32abed5ab84305377443ca18b9.jpg

And yes, love those Karver jammers, they get dunked, flogged, never been serviced aside from the occasional fresh water hose down and don't miss a beat. 

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16 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Pre internet Yamaha motorcycle dealers got a company newsletter via snail mail/courier to give to their customers.

This Newsletter in 1982 late in the year was 8 pages long... I think the reason that edition is a bit longer is there is a strong post war Japanese/Hawaii connection that was used to drive consumer goods sales/acceptance in the US....yes I know that sounds a bit Pearl Harbour weird. Anyway an opportunity came up.

Longy you made all of page 8 and were famous in the motorcycling world....a lot of bikers and motorcycle dealers around the world scratched their heads saying "what in the fuck is this sailing shit." :lol:

 

 

IMG_20200901_193548.jpg

Hey, thanks JS, don't remember ever seeing that article. Super Witch was wicked fast reaching, but a bit off the pace upwind. On the first ocean triangle, we passed 7 boats on the two reaching legs. After the series, she disappeared. A shame no one could charter her for Transpac, could have been a contender. I think she went back to Japan after CC.

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On 9/1/2020 at 1:43 PM, jack_sparrow said:

Every jap manufacturer bought something to the table at different times. Like Suzuki might have been late to the four-cylinder four-stroke party, but it's air/oil cooling design was the birth of the "sports bike" and a motor that continued unchanged for 2 decades. Even had a sexy name... SACS (Suzuki Advanced Cooling System) and the sleek looking engines looked sexy.

IMO Yamahas moment was 47 years ago last month at Finland's GP and was suspension not fuel/spark. 

1973 World Champion Swedens Hakan Andersson on a "mono-shocked" Yamaha 250.  That was Andersson's and Yamaha’s first motocross world title. The mono then became the standard.

I remember watching people watch mono shocked bikes for the first time scratching their heads wondering why it didn't have any rear suspension. :lol:

The sailing equivalent of Yamaha's moment of more efficient use of power (bikes of keeping driving rear wheel on the track) would be the canting keel.

Interestingly Yamaha are the only bike/motor manufacturer to have built boats AND sponsored an offshore sailing team being Ross Fields W60 in the 1994 Whitbread.

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images - 2020-09-01T140005.037.jpeg

A great vid showing how wickedly quick the Yamaha two strokes were. The talented MIke Edwards fluffing the start on a TZ350 and riding the pants off the thing to claw back the pack. Awesome bit of kit. 

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

If any one wants to buy a BH41 I will throw in a Jeanneau 40, a Sailing school and a set of steak knives. Teaching in that farking westerly gusting 40 yesterday was the last straw. 

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Interesting Comparison

JPK 1080

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION

Length overall LOA.................................10.80

Waterline length .......................................9.40

Hull width..................................................3.65

Draft .......................................................... 2.20

Weight ......................................................4,750

Ballast........................................................2,150

Berth ...................................................6 persons

Headroom...............................................1.92 m

Sail surfaces :

Mainsail ................................................ 40 m2 Genoa .................................................. 33 m2 Asymmetric spinnaker .......................120 m2 Symmetric spinnaker..........................105 m2

HULL AND DECK

Airex and balsa cored, polyester infusion sandwich construction

Sandwich Airex/glass partitions Anti-slip plastic flooring

Hull/deck assembly with vinylester glue

KEEL

Straight keel lead and iron
Built in keel sole with garboard covering Fixings in the timber floor structure

IRC Rating:  1.040

vs

Sydney 38 OD

General    
Overall Length: 11.74 m 38.52 ft
Waterline Length: 10.75 m 35.27 ft
Beam: 3.75 m 12.30 ft
Draft: 2.65 m 8.69 ft
Keel Weight: 1930 kg 4255 lbs
Fuel Capacity: 100 litres 26.4 US gal
Fresh Water Capacity: 100 litres 26.4 US gal
Engine Type:   Yanmar 22.4 kW 30 SHP
     
Displacement    
Empty: 5560 kg 12260 lbs
Loaded: 6920 kg 15255 lbs
     
Rig and Sail Dimensions    
I: 15.95 m 52.33 ft
J: 4.50 m 14.76 ft
P: 15.40 m 50.52 ft
E 5.50 m 18.04 ft
STL: 4.50 m 14.76 ft
     
Sail Areas    
Fore Triangle: 35.9 m²  386 sq.ft
Main: 51.5 m²  554 sq.ft
Jib: 39.2 m²  422 sq.ft
Spinnaker: 104.5 m²  1125 sq.ft
     
Classification    
CE Category: A - Ocean  
     
IRC Rating (approx): 1.112  
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The interesting bits are underlined.

Compare to a S 36

Sydney 36 CR

General    
Overall Length: 10.99 m 36.06 ft
Waterline Length: 9.55 m 31.33 ft
Beam: 3.45 m 11.32 ft
Draft: 2.3 m 7.55 ft
Keel Weight: 2200 kg 4850 lbs
Fuel Capacity: 110 litres 29.0 US gal
Fresh Water Capacity: 100 litres 26.4 US gal
Engine Type:   Yanmar 22.4 kW 30 SHP
     
Displacement    
Empty: 5200 kg 11460 lbs
Loaded: 6500 kg 14330 lbs
     
Rig and Sail Dimensions    
I: 13.90 m 45.60 ft
J: 4.26 m 13.98 ft
P: 13.52 m 44.36 ft
E 5.00 m 16.40 ft
STL: 5.26 m 17.26 ft
     
Sail Areas    
Fore Triangle: 29.5 m²  318 sq.ft
Main: 42.0 m²  452 sq.ft
Jib: 31.9 m²  343 sq.ft
Spinnaker: 113.9 m²  1226 sq.ft
     
Classification    
CE Category: A - Ocean  
     
IRC Rating (approx): 1.053  
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Or the Sunfast 3300

Specifications:

  • Architects: Andrieu / Verdier
  • Overall length: 10,49 m / 34'5''
  • Hull length: 9,99 m / 32'9''
  • Max beam: 3,40 m / 11'2''
  • Draft: 1,95 m / 6'5''
  • Displacement: env. 3500 kg / approx 7716 lbs
  • CE category (in progress): A6 - B7 - C10
  • Cabins: 2
  • Sail area upwind: 60 m" / 646 Sq ft
  • Sail area downwind (symmetrical spi.): 128 m" / 1378 Sq ft
  • Engine: 15 CV / 15 HP
  • Water capacity: 100 L / 26 US gal
  • Fuel capacity: 50 L / 13 US gal
  • Battery capacity: 120 Ah (+ 120 Ah opt.)
  • IRC rating estimate: Around 1.015
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  • 1 month later...

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