Schakel

Super yacht super times

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Besides the astonishing Sea Eagle doing 21 knots in an easy breezy,
We, in the netherlands, have high times on delivering never seen before fast and beastly, although comfortable super sailing yachts.

She was on the SA front page:
sea-eagle.thumb.jpg.382c04ce72cf04d82b163a0e7ef6679b.jpg
https://sailinganarchy.com/2020/06/16/when-one-mast-just-isnt-enough/
She made her maiden voyage:
She did 21 knots and is 81m / 266ft long.
Designed by Gerard Dijkstra, The same designer an Mathese Falcon.


Another astonioshing yacht was delivered by Vitters designed by Dubois. (2010)
(Dubois also designed the clipper round the world yachts)
Once a rare gem in yachting is getting more and more normal.
Not the design, It's reallly superb.

This is Ningaloo. Former Lady B.
https://www.charterworld.com/index.html?sub=yacht-charter&charter=lady-b-sailing-yacht-5765
314642318_44m-Yacht-NINGALOO-5765-175.jpg.df8e03902ac908a2c85587aa06c4d7a5.jpg
1553873972_LadyBUpperSalon.thumb.jpg.8df1435c70597eb6fb5054a6e38e96d1.jpg
434085574_44m-Yacht-NINGALOO-5765-218.thumb.jpg.1574eedb7a28d0de6f639be77a2a8210.jpg
1566916200_LadyBOwnercabin2.thumb.jpg.d063b9f2c0d4ffddbae3483498d0232a.jpg
I like the good qualitity atmosphere.
 

[44m-Yacht-NINGALOO]-5765-48.jpg

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I used to think that I’d want one of those if I hit the jackpot. Today, not.  So many reasons but the recent account in the Sailing forum about one anarchist’s personal experience with a broken boom on a 120’ sailing yacht is sobering. 

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1 minute ago, LB 15 said:

Buy an ad. 

Yep,

Do not mistake enthusiasm for opportunism.
It's realy remarkable how fast and beautifull those yachts are.

7 minutes ago, Student_Driver said:

I used to think that I’d want one of those if I hit the jackpot. Today, not.  So many reasons but the recent account in the Sailing forum about one anarchist’s personal experience with a broken boom on a 120’ sailing yacht is sobering. a

The forces on those yachts are quadratic, handling requires insight beyond house and garden handling.
Nevertheless that's the kick of it as well. Sailing far above the speed of the Tea Clippers.
Magical..
 

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Rich entitled cunts waving their cocks around. Enjoy your fawning.

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1 hour ago, alphafb552 said:

Yawn...

21 knots in windforce 3 is not boring in my opinion.
What is the fastest you have sailed?

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16 hours ago, Student_Driver said:

I used to think that I’d want one of those if I hit the jackpot. Today, not.  So many reasons but the recent account in the Sailing forum about one anarchist’s personal experience with a broken boom on a 120’ sailing yacht is sobering. 

link?

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1 hour ago, Schakel said:

...
What is the fastest you have sailed?

13+ knots on a square rigger in the South Atlantic

What's your point though? Moths do 20+ knots every day of the week at a fraction of the cost....

Look I can appreciate the craftsmanship that goes into these builds, and share some of the pride that our country the Netherlands can produce these boats, but to me they are still  mostly ugly, pointless and irrelevant... 

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1 hour ago, jackolantern said:

 

link?

NZK posted on the My Song Fell off a Containership thread on Aug 8th. 
 

Thanks 

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1 hour ago, alphafb552 said:

Look I can appreciate the craftsmanship that goes into these builds, and share some of the pride that our country the Netherlands can produce these boats, but to me they are still  mostly ugly, pointless and irrelevant dick swinging competitions... 

FTFY

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2 hours ago, alphafb552 said:

13+ knots on a square rigger in the South Atlantic

What's your point though? Moths do 20+ knots every day of the week at a fraction of the cost....

Look I can appreciate the craftsmanship that goes into these builds, and share some of the pride that our country the Netherlands can produce these boats, but to me they are still  mostly ugly, pointless and irrelevant... 

Charterfleet is hudge in the netherlands but grounded due to Corona.
Brown_fleet.thumb.PNG.1a454705e048a886985830bfc442b0b6.PNG
My son went on a chartertrip and came back with Corona, he's is a healthy guy and survived without any consequenses.

These new yachts are just an addition to charterfleet.
With a seafaring tradition there are a lot of people here who admire tall ship and even modern tallships.
(Another way of looking at superyachts; a heathy day out with large groups and family)
https://www.charterworld.com/
And when a huge ship slashes through the waves like the old tea clippers it's an exciting thing to see.

a0aa2f9a-4c4f-4ec4-93fb-6de698699dee.thumb.jpg.c1faffe65a909cafd184cf2f37458ae6.jpg
Do you call the above ugly? Well you like sailboats or not...
Link with a video of Sea eagle sailing, I find her magnificent. I really do. (for some reason I can't copy the video link but it's great, believe me.)
https://www.zeilen.nl/nieuws/actueel/video-zo-zeilt-miljoenenjacht-sea-eagle-ii-met-21-knopen-op-de-teller/
 

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26 minutes ago, Schakel said:


a0aa2f9a-4c4f-4ec4-93fb-6de698699dee.thumb.jpg.c1faffe65a909cafd184cf2f37458ae6.jpg
Do you call the above ugly? Well you like sailboats or not...
 

Seems to have a similar look to to a Mac 65 Pilothouse   I take it then that you also consider the Mac to be aesthetically pleasing.

Mac 65.jpg

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4 hours ago, Schakel said:

21 knots in windforce 3 is not boring in my opinion.
What is the fastest you have sailed?

Probably 21 knots...

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47 minutes ago, Schakel said:

Charterfleet is hudge in the netherlands but grounded due to Corona.
Brown_fleet.thumb.PNG.1a454705e048a886985830bfc442b0b6.PNG
My son went on a chartertrip and came back with Corona, he's is a healthy guy and survived without any consequenses.

These new yachts are just an addition to charterfleet.
With a seafaring tradition there are a lot of people here who admire tall ship and even modern tallships.
(Another way of looking at superyachts; a heathy day out with large groups and family)
https://www.charterworld.com/
And when a huge ship slashes through the waves like the old tea clippers it's an exciting thing to see.

a0aa2f9a-4c4f-4ec4-93fb-6de698699dee.thumb.jpg.c1faffe65a909cafd184cf2f37458ae6.jpg
Do you call the above ugly? Well you like sailboats or not...
Link with a video of Sea eagle sailing, I find her magnificent. I really do. (for some reason I can't copy the video link but it's great, believe me.)
https://www.zeilen.nl/nieuws/actueel/video-zo-zeilt-miljoenenjacht-sea-eagle-ii-met-21-knopen-op-de-teller/
 

Quadratic loads and cubic costs...yoi can buy a LOT of 505 dinghies....or one superyacht....

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1 hour ago, Schakel said:

Charterfleet is hudge in the netherlands but grounded due to Corona.
Brown_fleet.thumb.PNG.1a454705e048a886985830bfc442b0b6.PNG
My son went on a chartertrip and came back with Corona, he's is a healthy guy and survived without any consequenses.

These new yachts are just an addition to charterfleet.
With a seafaring tradition there are a lot of people here who admire tall ship and even modern tallships.
(Another way of looking at superyachts; a heathy day out with large groups and family)
https://www.charterworld.com/
And when a huge ship slashes through the waves like the old tea clippers it's an exciting thing to see.


Do you call the above ugly? Well you like sailboats or not...
Link with a video of Sea eagle sailing, I find her magnificent. I really do. (for some reason I can't copy the video link but it's great, believe me.)
https://www.zeilen.nl/nieuws/actueel/video-zo-zeilt-miljoenenjacht-sea-eagle-ii-met-21-knopen-op-de-teller/
 

Are you seriously comparing these modern charter ships that have rates of several thousands of euros per day with the Dutch traditional sailing fleet??????

And I know the fleet is locked down, the ship I crewed on for the last 4 years is smack in the centre foreground of that picture - and a lot of the others in the picture may not survive the next few years, what with lack of bookings combined with the threat of expiring safety certificates for many of these 100 year old ships that might have to be brought up to the  standards of new builds - even in cases where that is possible without destroying the character of the boat, the investments required are simply impossible to recoup.

You think all of that is worth sacrificing for one of these modern monstrosities that will spend their lives moored in the Med or the Carribbean with idiots on board who want to pretend for a week that they have more money than they actually have? They probably charge it all, drinks and hookers included, to their company expense accounts as well.

I'm glad for you that you like this new thing - so the next time you visit Vlissingen, Volendam, Enkhuizen, Harlingen or Stavoren, just imagine all these traditional ships replaced by one of these - except you won't be able to, because they will be in the Med...

 

 

 

 

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55 minutes ago, alphafb552 said:

Are you seriously comparing these modern charter ships that have rates of several thousands of euros per day with the Dutch traditional sailing fleet??????

And I know the fleet is locked down, the ship I crewed on for the last 4 years is smack in the centre foreground of that picture - and a lot of the others in the picture may not survive the next few years, what with lack of bookings combined with the threat of expiring safety certificates for many of these 100 year old ships that might have to be brought up to the  standards of new builds - even in cases where that is possible without destroying the character of the boat, the investments required are simply impossible to recoup.

You think all of that is worth sacrificing for one of these modern monstrosities that will spend their lives moored in the Med or the Carribbean with idiots on board who want to pretend for a week that they have more money than they actually have? They probably charge it all, drinks and hookers included, to their company expense accounts as well.

I'm glad for you that you like this new thing - so the next time you visit Vlissingen, Volendam, Enkhuizen, Harlingen or Stavoren, just imagine all these traditional ships replaced by one of these - except you won't be able to, because they will be in the Med...

 

 

 

 

Like in the "Wolf of wall street" superyachts are not associated with stylish sailing.
Crazy as is may seem, more superyachts are delivered every year, and most of them are in charterworld.
https://www.charterworld.com/

 @alphafb552 Did you see the video of Sea Eagle II blistering fast.
It's really astonishing. It's in the next link:
https://www.zeilen.nl/nieuws/actueel/video-zo-zeilt-miljoenenjacht-sea-eagle-ii-met-21-knopen-op-de-teller/

And "De Eendracht", "de Europa",  "Westerschelde" and "Minerva" are still in the Netherlands.
They were the superyachts of their time.
 

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2 hours ago, Schakel said:

a0aa2f9a-4c4f-4ec4-93fb-6de698699dee.thumb.jpg.c1faffe65a909cafd184cf2f37458ae6.jpg

 

Are Triatic stays like this the norm on these boats? Seems odd to me you wouldn't at least have running backstays on the two forward masts? Seems like a good way to lose three masts at once.

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46 minutes ago, Schakel said:



And "De Eendracht", "de Europa",  "Westerschelde" and "Minerva" are still in the Netherlands.
They were the superyachts of their time.
 

Schakel, now you are just being dumb. None of these was EVER built as a yacht. They were all converted from working ships for voyaging under sail.

Yes you can book berths on them to join a trip (I was on the Europa in the South Atlantic) but to compare these to the superyacht charter market is nonsensical 

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25 minutes ago, alphafb552 said:

Schakel, now you are just being dumb. None of these was EVER built as a yacht. They were all converted from working ships for voyaging under sail.

Yes you can book berths on them to join a trip (I was on the Europa in the South Atlantic) but to compare these to the superyacht charter market is nonsensical 


Matter of definition
Eendracht was never a working Cargo. Build 1989 at the Damen shipyard as sail training ship
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eendracht_(1989_ship)
Sail training ship is  what all of the four are build for.

Stad Amsterdam, not mentioned before, for charter in the same site you think it's not the same.
390844215_Stadamsterdam.PNG.e580c5f5886960b3a3bd4182995a782b.PNG
https://www.charterworld.com/index.html?sub=yacht-charter&charter=systad-amsterdam-2846
a72e457f22079f3621d3a44248220e96.jpg.08bae80a487e7d384d50b5e4b85be576.jpg
The difference is the classicals have corvin nails, and Sea Eagle has hydraulic winches.
The new america's cuppers are flying tesla's with shore charged battery packs.. I am not lying.


 

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2 hours ago, 12 metre said:

Seems to have a similar look to to a Mac 65 Pilothouse   I take it then that you also consider the Mac to be aesthetically pleasing.

Mac 65.jpg

When you show it in that context, the Big Mac actually looks OK!

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4 minutes ago, Hitchhiker said:

When you show it in that context, the Big Mac actually looks OK!

When smaller the Mac Gregor becomes ridiculious as very frequently discussed.
On boat design.net she was honoured by her multitasking and waterballast.
maxresdefault.thumb.jpg.6767b2f9ab3293f8cae184ec03c9532a.jpg
 

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57 minutes ago, climenuts said:

Are Triatic stays like this the norm on these boats? Seems odd to me you wouldn't at least have running backstays on the two forward masts? Seems like a good way to lose three masts at once.

Running back stays would impact on the guests view. And someone would have to go up and polish them every day. 

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7 minutes ago, LB 15 said:

Running back stays would impact on the guests view. And someone would have to go up and polish them every day. 

Back stays are the only solution if you want a light weight very powerfull rig.
VOR 65 have 2 of them.
271565967_VOR65mast.PNG.cb2430c157c006fc22a9a2ad9d3b14f7.PNG

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6 minutes ago, Schakel said:

Back stays are the only solution if you want a light weight very powerful rig.

And yet all of the new record setting trimarans are going without them...

LB nailed it though, this should be more of a consideration seeing as how the design criteria for these boats IS NOT ultimate performance!

17 minutes ago, LB 15 said:

Running back stays would impact on the guests view. And someone would have to go up and polish them every day. 

When I inherit all of Bezos's money I'll be sure to order mine without backstays, I don't want that shit in my instagram pictures. Plus then I can put a helipad back there and not worry about going up in flames when a rotor hits the wire.

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On 8/28/2020 at 5:13 AM, Schakel said:

I like the good qualitity atmosphere.

Is that couch meant to be a sea berth.

These sailing behemoths with their mansion like interiors are a nightmare when underway and heaven forbid healed that’s why they spend most of their lives dockside getting endlessly polished.

18F98E7F-9AE1-4B85-AB4B-8ECA80019DD9.jpeg.f295c06a0452b144ad89b3f3b731198d.jpeg

 

 

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2 hours ago, Schakel said:

Like in the "Wolf of wall street" superyachts are not associated with stylish sailing.
Crazy as is may seem, more superyachts are delivered every year, and most of them are in charterworld.
https://www.charterworld.com/

 @alphafb552 Did you see the video of Sea Eagle II blistering fast.
It's really astonishing. It's in the next link:
https://www.zeilen.nl/nieuws/actueel/video-zo-zeilt-miljoenenjacht-sea-eagle-ii-met-21-knopen-op-de-teller/

And "De Eendracht", "de Europa",  "Westerschelde" and "Minerva" are still in the Netherlands.
They were the superyachts of their time.
 

Notice in the video that no one is on deck.  20-25 knots of breeze constantly ruffles the hair dos and gets salt stains on the suede.  

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8 hours ago, Schakel said:

21 knots in windforce 3 is not boring in my opinion.
What is the fastest you have sailed?

Meh. We beat that with delivery sails and only four guys onboard. I might have been impressed 30 years ago. 

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Gentlemen never sail to weather. The owner is likely on one his estates in Sardinia. The delivery crew set the autopilot and are watching netflix in the main salon.

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On 8/27/2020 at 10:13 AM, Schakel said:

Besides the astonishing Sea Eagle doing 21 knots in an easy breezy,
We, in the netherlands, have high times on delivering never seen before fast and beastly, although comfortable super sailing yachts.

She was on the SA front page:
sea-eagle.thumb.jpg.382c04ce72cf04d82b163a0e7ef6679b.jpg
https://sailinganarchy.com/2020/06/16/when-one-mast-just-isnt-enough/
She made her maiden voyage:
She did 21 knots and is 81m / 266ft long.
Designed by Gerard Dijkstra, The same designer an Mathese Falcon.


Another astonioshing yacht was delivered by Vitters designed by Dubois. (2010)
(Dubois also designed the clipper round the world yachts)
Once a rare gem in yachting is getting more and more normal.
Not the design, It's reallly superb.

This is Ningaloo. Former Lady B.
https://www.charterworld.com/index.html?sub=yacht-charter&charter=lady-b-sailing-yacht-5765
314642318_44m-Yacht-NINGALOO-5765-175.jpg.df8e03902ac908a2c85587aa06c4d7a5.jpg
1553873972_LadyBUpperSalon.thumb.jpg.8df1435c70597eb6fb5054a6e38e96d1.jpg
434085574_44m-Yacht-NINGALOO-5765-218.thumb.jpg.1574eedb7a28d0de6f639be77a2a8210.jpg
1566916200_LadyBOwnercabin2.thumb.jpg.d063b9f2c0d4ffddbae3483498d0232a.jpg
I like the good qualitity atmosphere.
 

[44m-Yacht-NINGALOO]-5765-48.jpg

not positive but i think i saw sea eagle in panama in february.. from a long way away. there were 3  of the biggest masts i had ever seen on the pacific side of the canal.

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2 hours ago, Borax Johnson said:

Gentlemen never sail to weather. The owner is likely on one his estates in Sardinia. The delivery crew set the autopilot and are watching netflix in the main salon.

This

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When I was running these things, crew were NEVER allowed to use guest areas. The stewardess' would spend their time cleaning already clean things, otherwise the guest areas are a ghost town when owner/charters not aboard... Usually completely covered with dust covers and carpet runners.... Crew stick to the crew mess for any down time. Most crew messes were nicer than my house!

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8 hours ago, Hitchhiker said:

When you show it in that context, the Big Mac actually looks OK!

Roger and Paul have done a great job of providing a reasonable looking yacht at an attractive price, a good business equation. Based on the number sold worldwide and  that I've seen cruising, at least coastal, tropical and Western Med, I'd have to say congrats. But no, I'm not buying one.

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2 hours ago, bigrpowr said:

not positive but i think i saw sea eagle in panama in february.. from a long way away. there were 3  of the biggest masts i had ever seen on the pacific side of the canal.

Have you thought about a career as a clairvoyant? ;)

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1 hour ago, charisma94 said:

When I was running these things, crew were NEVER allowed to use guest areas. The stewardess' would spend their time cleaning already clean things, otherwise the guest areas are a ghost town when owner/charters not aboard... Usually completely covered with dust covers and carpet runners.... Crew stick to the crew mess for any down time. Most crew messes were nicer than my house!

Soooooo no one ever had a ‘Ronnie Cout’ in the owners rack? 

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54 minutes ago, LB 15 said:

Soooooo no one ever had a ‘Ronnie Cout’ in the owners rack? 

Well, never say never... But seriously, as soon as he pissed off, we used to dismantle his bedding, vacuum wrap & store the mattress, no one ever got the chance for a Donald Duck in his scratcher. Cover the interior furniture and put the exterior cushions away, thousands of the bastards.

As soon as that was all done, it was off to the pub & you wouldn't see most of the crew for days! Had to spend the massive tips we got...

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On 8/27/2020 at 6:55 PM, LB 15 said:

Rich entitled cunts waving their cocks around. Enjoy your fawning.

Do you have a boat?

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Fossil-driven, but still very insightful.

Good channel, too.

 

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On 8/27/2020 at 7:13 PM, Schakel said:

Besides the astonishing Sea Eagle doing 21 knots in an easy breezy,
We, in the netherlands, have high times on delivering never seen before fast and beastly, although comfortable super sailing yachts.

She was on the SA front page:
sea-eagle.thumb.jpg.382c04ce72cf04d82b163a0e7ef6679b.jpg
https://sailinganarchy.com/2020/06/16/when-one-mast-just-isnt-enough/
She made her maiden voyage:
She did 21 knots and is 81m / 266ft long.
Designed by Gerard Dijkstra, The same designer an Mathese Falcon.
 

Why do they have such a big tender taking up all of that prime deck space?  Is there a hidden crane to launch and retrieve it?

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4 hours ago, Ed Lada said:

Why do they have such a big tender taking up all of that prime deck space?  Is there a hidden crane to launch and retrieve it?

Strangely enough there are not a lot of drawings, photo's about Sea Eagle.
Guess they choose for a big on deck tender instead a small dinghi garage in the stern.
Owner is Dr. Samuel Yin, a Taiwanese bussinessman. Guess he likes his privacy.
Samuel_Yin_1st_Tang_Prize.jpg.66acb1a106dcde6669fc89b0f43355cf.jpg
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Yin

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21 hours ago, Left Shift said:

Notice in the video that no one is on deck.  20-25 knots of breeze constantly ruffles the hair dos and gets salt stains on the suede.  

Imagine cleaning the main saloon windows every day and after sailing.
But; the above guy has personell enough.
40250690-people-housework-and-housekeeping-concept-happy-woman-in-gloves-cleaning-window-with-rag-and-cleanse.jpg.f28f57b3532c1251481b43cfed66bac1.jpg
 

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4 hours ago, Schakel said:

Strangely enough there are not a lot of drawings, photo's about Sea Eagle.
Guess they choose for a big on deck tender instead a small dinghi garage in the stern.
Owner is Dr. Samuel Yin, a Taiwanese bussinessman. Guess he likes his privacy.
Samuel_Yin_1st_Tang_Prize.jpg.66acb1a106dcde6669fc89b0f43355cf.jpg
hqdefault.jpg

That is so obvious. I can't believe you are all falling for this 'privacy' thing.

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12 hours ago, bgytr said:

Do you have a boat?

Of course not. Sailing sucks. I only come here to troll people.

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9 hours ago, Schakel said:

Strangely enough there are not a lot of drawings, photo's about Sea Eagle.
Guess they choose for a big on deck tender instead a small dinghi garage in the stern.
Owner is Dr. Samuel Yin, a Taiwanese bussinessman. Guess he likes his privacy.
Samuel_Yin_1st_Tang_Prize.jpg.66acb1a106dcde6669fc89b0f43355cf.jpg
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Yin

 

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6 minutes ago, ExOmo said:

21 knots on a 266 footer.  Would you even notice?

21/SQRT(266).

Actually yes. That's close to so-called "hull speed." Then again, FLYING CLOUD did that --- in 1852. Oh, and she exceeded "hull speed." She was barely over 200 feet on the waterline.

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1 hour ago, fastyacht said:

21/SQRT(266).

Actually yes. That's close to so-called "hull speed." Then again, FLYING CLOUD did that --- in 1852. Oh, and she exceeded "hull speed." She was barely over 200 feet on the waterline.

When these things wind up, the loads are terrifying! Yah, you notice.

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2 hours ago, charisma94 said:

When these things wind up, the loads are terrifying! Yah, you notice.

not to mention when a runner deck block goes bang at 3 am half way between cocos and reunion.......

 

 

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On August 27, 2020 at 10:13 AM, Schakel said:

Besides the astonishing Sea Eagle doing 21 knots in an easy breezy,
We, in the netherlands, have high times on delivering never seen before fast and beastly, although comfortable super sailing yachts.

She was on the SA front page:
sea-eagle.thumb.jpg.382c04ce72cf04d82b163a0e7ef6679b.jpg
https://sailinganarchy.com/2020/06/16/when-one-mast-just-isnt-enough/
She made her maiden voyage:
She did 21 knots and is 81m / 266ft long.
Designed by Gerard Dijkstra, The same designer an Mathese Falcon.


Another astonioshing yacht was delivered by Vitters designed by Dubois. (2010)
(Dubois also designed the clipper round the world yachts)
Once a rare gem in yachting is getting more and more normal.
Not the design, It's reallly superb.

This is Ningaloo. Former Lady B.
https://www.charterworld.com/index.html?sub=yacht-charter&charter=lady-b-sailing-yacht-5765
314642318_44m-Yacht-NINGALOO-5765-175.jpg.df8e03902ac908a2c85587aa06c4d7a5.jpg
1553873972_LadyBUpperSalon.thumb.jpg.8df1435c70597eb6fb5054a6e38e96d1.jpg
434085574_44m-Yacht-NINGALOO-5765-218.thumb.jpg.1574eedb7a28d0de6f639be77a2a8210.jpg
1566916200_LadyBOwnercabin2.thumb.jpg.d063b9f2c0d4ffddbae3483498d0232a.jpg
I like the good qualitity atmosphere.
 

[44m-Yacht-NINGALOO]-5765-48.jpg

What does it rate?

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On August 28, 2020 at 8:08 AM, Schakel said:

Charterfleet is hudge in the netherlands but grounded due to Corona.
Brown_fleet.thumb.PNG.1a454705e048a886985830bfc442b0b6.PNG
My son went on a chartertrip and came back with Corona, he's is a healthy guy and survived without any consequenses.

These new yachts are just an addition to charterfleet.
With a seafaring tradition there are a lot of people here who admire tall ship and even modern tallships.
(Another way of looking at superyachts; a heathy day out with large groups and family)
https://www.charterworld.com/
And when a huge ship slashes through the waves like the old tea clippers it's an exciting thing to see.

a0aa2f9a-4c4f-4ec4-93fb-6de698699dee.thumb.jpg.c1faffe65a909cafd184cf2f37458ae6.jpg
Do you call the above ugly? Well you like sailboats or not...
Link with a video of Sea eagle sailing, I find her magnificent. I really do. (for some reason I can't copy the video link but it's great, believe me.)
https://www.zeilen.nl/nieuws/actueel/video-zo-zeilt-miljoenenjacht-sea-eagle-ii-met-21-knopen-op-de-teller/
 

The anchor thingy is ugly and I don't think you can see the tell tails on the jibs from the helm, otherwise it's just too big.

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Zenji was in town (Sag Harbor) the other day. Nice little 56m boat. 
 

 

02DFA09A-020D-4237-A5A1-D325452AE69E.jpeg

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Zenji, owned by Larry Ellison, its apparently for sale but at this level they all are for the right amount.

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4 minutes ago, Navig8tor said:

Zenji, owned by Larry Ellison, its apparently for sale but at this level they all are for the right amount.

FTFY

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Sag Harbor is about the only place around here that thesr things seem to shoe up. Never see them in NewHaven, Westbrook, Newlondon or New Bedford

15 hours ago, Sean said:


Zenji was in town (Sag Harbor) the other

 

On 8/28/2020 at 11:10 PM, charisma94 said:

 

 

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On 8/29/2020 at 8:45 PM, charisma94 said:

When these things wind up, the loads are terrifying! Yah, you notice.

So how can you tell aside from load sensors? I mean the turnbuckle must be 10 feet tall so how can you tell it is under so much load? You must be dozens of yards away from the main sheet. Do you go jump up and down on the jib sheet? What are the sheets made of anyway? 6" diameter Vectran? 

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2 minutes ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

So how can you tell

ya arse puckers .

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Just now, Mid said:

ya arse puckers .

Well my arse puckered when driving a Swan 441 with wire sheets and wire afterguys on a pole on the headstay reach with the 2.2oz or on a two tonner offshore in breeze DDW at night because the loads were actively looking for ways to kill you.  You could sense the tension from the sounds if nothing else.

On these monsters the loads are 100x an IOR boat, but I imagine they are pretty quiet. Maybe I am wrong.

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3 minutes ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

Well my arse puckered when driving a Swan 441 with wire sheets and wire afterguys on a pole on the headstay reach with the 2.2oz or on a two tonner offshore in breeze DDW at night because the loads were actively looking for ways to kill you.  You could sense the tension from the sounds if nothing else.

On these monsters the loads are 100x an IOR boat, but I imagine they are pretty quiet. Maybe I am wrong.

no way you're ever going to load one of these up like that , just ain't going to happen .

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probably as close as you are going to get and the decks are mainly dry ...

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41 minutes ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

Well my arse puckered when driving a Swan 441 with wire sheets and wire afterguys on a pole on the headstay reach with the 2.2oz or on a two tonner offshore in breeze DDW at night because the loads were actively looking for ways to kill you.  You could sense the tension from the sounds if nothing else.

On these monsters the loads are 100x an IOR boat, but I imagine they are pretty quiet. Maybe I am wrong.

in 2010 a loose jib acted as a whip on board Salperton IV. (45 meter 147 feet) in superyachtcup Sardinia
A man on the weather side of the yacht when the weather sheet flogged as the half-trimmed blade jib flogged violently. Catching the man round the waist the sheet hurled him against the boom vang. He broke six ribs and damaged his spleen.
To illustrate the forces on these boats..
889058110_Salperton4.jpg.75fda7ea7978139a46c6f4c3f520e934.jpg
https://www.yachtingworld.com/microsites/supersail-world/supersail-news/yachtsman-loses-spleen-in-superyacht-accident-8377

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1 hour ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

Well my arse puckered when driving a Swan 441 with wire sheets and wire afterguys on a pole on the headstay reach with the 2.2oz or on a two tonner offshore in breeze DDW at night because the loads were actively looking for ways to kill you.  You could sense the tension from the sounds if nothing else.

On these monsters the loads are 100x an IOR boat, but I imagine they are pretty quiet. Maybe I am wrong.

Arse pucker is correct!

Not my photo... But for some perspective, the staysail furler on MV. The headsail & Code furlers were double that size.

image.png.5cba120df5e7e914d3be112ea2bf1a74.png

IIRC 160 tons of jack pressure under the mast.

They are quiet, but they definitely dance and  "hum" if I can explain it that way? I suppose no real different to any boat that is pressed up... just in the back of your mind you know the loads are deadly serious, but 1 ton will kill you just as fast as 50 tons.

 

 

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On 8/30/2020 at 6:57 AM, Ease the sheet. said:

not to mention when a runner deck block goes bang at 3 am half way between cocos and reunion.......

 

 

Don’t be ridiculous, they park at night.

A noise like that would wake people up.

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2 hours ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

What are the sheets made of anyway? 6" diameter Vectran? 

Everything is Dyneema, big Dyneema. The running rigging package was put together by Todd Cooper - he's a kiwi rigger working out of Palma de Mallorca. Check out his instagram page as he has plenty of posts about the Sea Eagle work (and plenty more of his vintage motorbikes and espresso machines).

https://instagram.com/cooperrigging?igshid=drwwqye76yd0 

More and more of the the big superyachts are getting wound up, some are more suited to it than others. Watching the big Perini Navis, such as Zenji, lurch around their 'race' courses is fucking ridiculous and terrifying - the loads on those things will be monstruous and they were never designed to be pushed that hard.

Others such as the J's, Wally Cento's and performance Baltic's such as Visione, Win Win and Hetairos are more suited to being pushed but the loads are still phenomenal. One of the main reasons so many big name pro's are onboard is safety rather than performance - there is no space for fuck-ups as even the simplest error could have pretty dire consequences (see Svea vs Topaz earlier this year)...

There was a lot of chatter circulating earlier this year (or maybe last year, time is elastic right now) about Hetairos (67m carbon fibre ketch) hitting 50 knots on a west-east transatlantic crossing. The story was that they hit a low pressure system which happened to have the perfect swell period that was just launching Hetairos to a point where mid-surf all the sails were just flogging on centreline much like on a small dinghy... apparently they had nav data to prove it as not even the rest of the crew could beleive it to begin with.... don't know if anyone else on here has any more info about this story? I never saw any actual figures to confirm the max speed but it does at least suggest they had the thing going like a train....

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7 hours ago, charisma94 said:

They are quiet, but they definitely dance and  "hum" if I can explain it that way? I suppose no real different to any boat that is pressed up... just in the back of your mind you know the loads are deadly serious, but 1 ton will kill you just as fast as 50 tons.

Thanks for an answer that addressed my question. Obviously a load cell or math or simple observation will tell you that the loads are 1 or 2 orders of magnitude what mortals are used to dealing with. My question is how you could sense it, and the humming I understand. Even on a big old IOR boat or 12 meter the wire would "sing" when the loads got big, and since the technology wasn't very good there was a chance that something would break and kill you. There was an AC Boat in Italy, IIRC correctly, where a halyard foot turning block sheave let go and killed the poor pit man. 

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5 hours ago, NZK said:

More and more of the the big superyachts are getting wound up, some are more suited to it than others. Watching the big Perini Navis, such as Zenji, lurch around their 'race' courses is fucking ridiculous and terrifying - the loads on those things will be monstruous and they were never designed to be pushed that hard.

Others such as the J's, Wally Cento's and performance Baltic's such as Visione, Win Win and Hetairos are more suited to being pushed but the loads are still phenomenal. One of the main reasons so many big name pro's are onboard is safety rather than performance - there is no space for fuck-ups as even the simplest error could have pretty dire consequences (see Svea vs Topaz earlier this year)...

There was a lot of chatter circulating earlier this year (or maybe last year, time is elastic right now) about Hetairos (67m carbon fibre ketch) hitting 50 knots on a west-east transatlantic crossing. The story was that they hit a low pressure system which happened to have the perfect swell period that was just launching Hetairos to a point where mid-surf all the sails were just flogging on centreline much like on a small dinghy... apparently they had nav data to prove it as not even the rest of the crew could beleive it to begin with.... don't know if anyone else on here has any more info about this story? I never saw any actual figures to confirm the max speed but it does at least suggest they had the thing going like a train....

Many years ago I sailed on the 145' Perini Navi ketch named Andromeda la Dea and another similar sized yacht called Juliet. This was before a lot of the modern furling and materials technology. It was pretty clear they had limits they were not intended to exceed. If I recall correctly, the Perini had, by default, sensors that would ease the sails if the boat got to 15 degrees of heel (although this mode could be overridden). Contrast that with Mari-Cha IV which I have always thought was the perfect superyacht. I never understood why he replaced her with V. 

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9 hours ago, NZK said:

Everything is Dyneema, big Dyneema. The running rigging package was put together by Todd Cooper - he's a kiwi rigger working out of Palma de Mallorca. Check out his instagram page as he has plenty of posts about the Sea Eagle work (and plenty more of his vintage motorbikes and espresso machines).

https://instagram.com/cooperrigging?igshid=drwwqye76yd0 

More and more of the the big superyachts are getting wound up, some are more suited to it than others. Watching the big Perini Navis, such as Zenji, lurch around their 'race' courses is fucking ridiculous and terrifying - the loads on those things will be monstruous and they were never designed to be pushed that hard.

Others such as the J's, Wally Cento's and performance Baltic's such as Visione, Win Win and Hetairos are more suited to being pushed but the loads are still phenomenal. One of the main reasons so many big name pro's are onboard is safety rather than performance - there is no space for fuck-ups as even the simplest error could have pretty dire consequences (see Svea vs Topaz earlier this year)...

There was a lot of chatter circulating earlier this year (or maybe last year, time is elastic right now) about Hetairos (67m carbon fibre ketch) hitting 50 knots on a west-east transatlantic crossing. The story was that they hit a low pressure system which happened to have the perfect swell period that was just launching Hetairos to a point where mid-surf all the sails were just flogging on centreline much like on a small dinghy... apparently they had nav data to prove it as not even the rest of the crew could beleive it to begin with.... don't know if anyone else on here has any more info about this story? I never saw any actual figures to confirm the max speed but it does at least suggest they had the thing going like a train....

Still a marvel of technology. keep safe distance when high loads: might snap, doesn't feel safe but that is part of the charm of these monsters as well.
I worked in heavy industry and it might look even dumb, but handling big loads is a challenge in itself.
Requires mechanical insight en cautionness. The above examples prove enough.

By the way:  sea faring was always like this, hundreds of books are written about these impressive achievements.
Pretty sure the dutch yards and engineers gives you a trustworthy safe yacht. At a price but still an achievement.
I like Heitaros, does someone have pictures of her surfing like a small dinghy on hudge waves?
50 knots? Was on the log probably, that's scary but great.
riu-orig_hetairos-by-michael-kurtz-2280x

 

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On 8/28/2020 at 12:44 PM, Schakel said:

When smaller the Mac Gregor becomes ridiculious as very frequently discussed.
On boat design.net she was honoured by her multitasking and waterballast.
maxresdefault.thumb.jpg.6767b2f9ab3293f8cae184ec03c9532a.jpg
 

Oh Good God...  Not this again.....  

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15 minutes ago, 10thTonner said:

*10

I thought is more like a 'Brazillion'...

A large number, equal to the entire GDP or population of Brazil.
Donald Rumsfeld is giving the president his daily briefing. He concludes by saying: "Yesterday, 3 Brazilian soldiers were killed."

"OH NO!" the President exclaims. "That's terrible!"

His staff sits stunned at this display of emotion, nervously watching as the President sits, head in hands.

Finally, the President looks up and asks, "How many is a brazillion?"
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Not sure about the forces on the rigging of these monsters but the big racked, ex model third wives of the owners of these boats can sure take a load. That is their primary function. 

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6 minutes ago, LB 15 said:

Not sure about the forces on the rigging of these monsters but the big racked, ex model third wives of the owners of these boats can sure take a load. That is their primary function. 

With a not so sympathetic pipe in his mouth.
You knows this is  kind of role play as well?
Piping: two dumbheads on one stick.

I am somewhat familiar to what these owners have to endure.
Believe me: it's not for the fainthearted.
They endure more jealousy and envy and like in the case of DT they crack under the negative opinion.
Some decency might be appropriate.

But enjoy your trolling; I am a trollcatcher in the end...

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On 8/30/2020 at 1:01 AM, LB 15 said:

Of course not. Sailing sucks. I only come here to troll people.

Says enough doesn't it?

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2 hours ago, Schakel said:

I am somewhat familiar to what these owners have to endure.
Believe me: it's not for the faint hearted.

Yes those poor little billionaires- you must feel so sorry for them. Life mustn’t be easy having a head the exact size and shape as a basketball.

6D19F2B0-6625-4347-B06A-DAB5510208A2.jpeg

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2 hours ago, Schakel said:

But enjoy your trolling; I am a trollcatcher in the end...

Oh I am enjoying myself. And thanks for playing even if you were an easy catch.

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On 8/27/2020 at 12:33 PM, Student_Driver said:

I used to think that I’d want one of those if I hit the jackpot. Today, not.  So many reasons but the recent account in the Sailing forum about one anarchist’s personal experience with a broken boom on a 120’ sailing yacht is sobering. 

It's be said already:

If it floats, flies or fucks

RENT it!

 

I'd pay to do a trans oceanic delivery on Hetairos!

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4 hours ago, shaggy said:

Oh Good God...  Not this again.....  

You gifte them thet reactione, thelle do it againe................   juste sayeng                            :)

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13 hours ago, NZK said:

There was a lot of chatter circulating earlier this year (or maybe last year, time is elastic right now) about Hetairos (67m carbon fibre ketch) hitting 50 knots on a west-east transatlantic crossing. The story was that they hit a low pressure system which happened to have the perfect swell period that was just launching Hetairos to a point where mid-surf all the sails were just flogging on centreline much like on a small dinghy... apparently they had nav data to prove it as not even the rest of the crew could beleive it to begin with.... don't know if anyone else on here has any more info about this story? I never saw any actual figures to confirm the max speed but it does at least suggest they had the thing going like a train....

50 knots??? Yeah nah. I'd need to see that nav data! Unless racing, these things are so heavily reefed down on a ocean passage, with delivery crew mostly, they might surf at 30kn for a moment, but 50? Nah. VO65's or a Comanche can't do those speeds.

As for needing Pros to help us "sail" these things. Also BS. Pro's do drive in regattas, call tactics and starts etc. so I guess they help in that sense. There is a whole other technique to sailing one of these things and handle the loads safely, which pro's only learn when we teach them! You can't tack one of these, i.e. throw the sheet, to let sails & sheets flog going through a tack... You'd absolutely flatten stanchions, break windows, ripping tenders off fore decks, kill people, destroy radars, destroy the carbon mast with clew fittings, not to mention trashing a pretty expensive head sail... There's a veer function on the primary, which gets eased to match the speed of the furler, with the sail under control and mostly furled you make your tack. All at the push of a button, controlled by one guy, usually exclusively by the Captain or Mate only. You may even need to start the engine to help you make the tack!! Over about 50m LOA, a head sail should never be allowed to flog...

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Posted in another thread. My pics.

When it goes wrong, it goes terribly wrong! Motor sailing downwind with just the head sail... Bang!

image.png.070ef3b12f1b9c07ed7c651508c7a7f0.png

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3 hours ago, charisma94 said:

You can't tack one of these, i.e. throw the sheet, to let sails & sheets flog going through a tack... You'd absolutely flatten stanchions, break windows, ripping tenders off fore decks, kill people, destroy radars, destroy the carbon mast with clew fittings, not to mention trashing a pretty expensive head sail... There's a veer function on the primary, which gets eased to match the speed of the furler, with the sail under control and mostly furled you make your tack. All at the push of a button, controlled by one guy, usually exclusively by the Captain or Mate only. You may even need to start the engine to help you make the tack!! Over about 50m LOA, a head sail should never be allowed to flog...

So I am sure that is true of the cruisy ones, but is it also true of the racy ones? I guess the J-s aren't really that big at 140' LOA, but some of those big fuckers at the Bucket look pretty racy.

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37 minutes ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

So I am sure that is true of the cruisy ones, but is it also true of the racy ones? I guess the J-s aren't really that big at 140' LOA, but some of those big fuckers at the Bucket look pretty racy.

No question - J's are big boats by any measure...

But, unless they're using a high clew, short footed Yankee with staysail, they don't tack often. J's don't run with fixed inner forestays when racing, so you can get away with a "normal" tack. No furlers either, radar's and domes removed for racing. Fractional head sails too, so a good bit smaller than mast head rig genoas.

Racing J's pay the price ($$$) for racing them like dinghy's. For the "cruisier" ones, consider they have to preserve their sails & gear for a long time. You can't arrive after a trans Atlantic with a ripped sail and a charter/owner commitments in a week or so... A simple thing like a broken batten on a mainsail could ruin a charter season, losing millions of dollars potentially.

It's the little things... break a batten mid Atlantic... The logistics of getting a +100ft batten made, then ship to Antigua, we're talking weeks if not months lead time... Repairing the torn batten pocket (or any small tear) involves cranes removing the sail off the boom onto a truck, then off the truck once you've found a loft that can do a repair... Logistically, if we're in the Caribbean, we'd motor back to FLA to be closer to to services & people that could handle such a job.

Most of our sailing was done in a straight line...

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12 hours ago, LB 15 said:

Yes those poor little billionaires- you must feel so sorry for them. Life mustn’t be easy having a head the exact size and shape as a basketball.

6D19F2B0-6625-4347-B06A-DAB5510208A2.jpeg

Better sail around the world in a threemaster then doing nothing and being bored about everything.

 

12 hours ago, LB 15 said:

Oh I am enjoying myself. And thanks for playing even if you were an easy catch.

And do you reallly have nothing better to do?
 

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11 hours ago, charisma94 said:

No question - J's are big boats by any measure...

But, unless they're using a high clew, short footed Yankee with staysail, they don't tack often. J's don't run with fixed inner forestays when racing, so you can get away with a "normal" tack. No furlers either, radar's and domes removed for racing. Fractional head sails too, so a good bit smaller than mast head rig genoas.

Racing J's pay the price ($$$) for racing them like dinghy's. For the "cruisier" ones, consider they have to preserve their sails & gear for a long time. You can't arrive after a trans Atlantic with a ripped sail and a charter/owner commitments in a week or so... A simple thing like a broken batten on a mainsail could ruin a charter season, losing millions of dollars potentially.

It's the little things... break a batten mid Atlantic... The logistics of getting a +100ft batten made, then ship to Antigua, we're talking weeks if not months lead time... Repairing the torn batten pocket (or any small tear) involves cranes removing the sail off the boom onto a truck, then off the truck once you've found a loft that can do a repair... Logistically, if we're in the Caribbean, we'd motor back to FLA to be closer to to services & people that could handle such a job.

Most of our sailing was done in a straight line...

WOW, Great insight.  THX...

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