Baldur

Everyone is buying boats...

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Local brokerage in Vancouver told me they sold more boats in May then ever before. As fall approaches I think the market will cool off.

A local surveyor was booked until end of Sept...

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The number of visiting boats here in Blakely harbor has greatly increased even since Covid-19 hit. Many more even some days during the work week. And weekends are usually packed. Much less rafting, but still some of that too. Great for boat watching. Good variety too, including some much larger vessels than usual.

B463D2D1-CB86-41B2-AA64-6D22EDF4E2E1.jpeg

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Way more people on the water here too (Marblehead). Even on weekdays the local swimming spots are packed. I did notice a drop in Craigslist activity as summer was starting but I think the number of boats for sale (sailboats) has gone back up as we near the end of the season.

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I've been on the boat hunt for a few months, and every broker has the same refrain - recreational boats are the hot ticket this summer.  Why....maybe ultra low interest rates,  lack of travel options,  social distancing requirements...and I think also a sense for some that the world is burning, why wait to do something they've always wanted.

 

 

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We just sold our boat.  It was on the market for 3 months before we had a nice offer.  Then it took 7 weeks to close.  Everything about the closing process took longer than normal.  In contrast we bought a boat in late February.  Process took less than 2 weeks.  

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A friend is in the market and I am assisting. I have been noticing much higher asking prices, and boats seem to sell, but don't have data on the actual sale price. He is not in a hurry and I suspect the fall will cool things down a bit. Some have told me that I am misreading the market, which might be true, but some the posts above suggest I am not off. 

On the other hand, I have seen some sweet deals as well, but mostly those were racing sailboats, not cruisers. 

The closing issue: This is a strange time in terms of financing, surveying, and what not. Neighbor friends are trying to get a loan for a renovation on their home. The home is worth a ridiculous amount of money, their double income is impressive, rates are really low, but actually getting the loan turns out to be quite challenging. You need to find the right broker who can navigate this. 

 

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Twice, last year I tried to sell a 50hp outboard - no luck.  A month ago, I tried again and it sold in minutes (craigslist).

My wife decided to sell her Moto Guzzi last month.  Sold first day (craigslist).

 Steve

 

 

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Seems to be all cruising or cruiser/racer boats here...

The racers are struggling as ever.

A fairly over-priced C&C 99 just went under offer because it is pretty much the only boat in it's "class" for sale.

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19 hours ago, kimbottles said:

The number of visiting boats here in Blakely harbor has greatly increased even since Covid-19 hit. Many more even some days during the work week. And weekends are usually packed. Much less rafting, but still some of that too. Great for boat watching. Good variety too, including some much larger vessels than usual.

B463D2D1-CB86-41B2-AA64-6D22EDF4E2E1.jpeg

That's a ship

Just for future reference

FB- Doug

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If people are rushing out to buy boats,  they're buying the wrong ones. 

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If anyone’s looking for a Sabre 402, tell them that mine’s for sale for one million dollars. I’ll throw in explaining how to fix the head solenoid.

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12 hours ago, Ajax said:

If people are rushing out to buy boats,  they're buying the wrong ones. 

'splain please

 

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6 minutes ago, Baldur said:

'splain please

 

Most people are buying powerboats. If the virus is going to lead to a boom in boating, I wish it would lead to a renaissance in sailing.

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39 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Most people are buying powerboats. If the virus is going to lead to a boom in boating, I wish it would lead to a renaissance in sailing.

The problem is that the boom is heavily driven by first time boat owners buying small runabouts, fishing boats, or pontoon boats. They want to get out on the water right away and not spend the time learning how to sail. 

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6 minutes ago, Monkey said:

The problem is that the boom is heavily driven by first time boat owners buying small runabouts, fishing boats, or pontoon boats. They want to get out on the water right away and not spend the time learning how to sail. 

This is my experience as well. We know a few families that bought small powerboats this summer, after never really expressing an interest in boating before.

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2 hours ago, Monkey said:
2 hours ago, Ajax said:

Most people are buying powerboats. If the virus is going to lead to a boom in boating, I wish it would lead to a renaissance in sailing.

The problem is that the boom is heavily driven by first time boat owners buying small runabouts, fishing boats, or pontoon boats. They want to get out on the water right away and not spend the time learning how to sail. 

You have to let the seductive magic of sailing do it's work.

Engines are more reliable, cleaner, quieter, BETTER, that ever before and fuel is has rarely been cheaper. Why would they NOT buy motorboats? OTOH if the idea is to have fun out on the water, sailing is fun.

FB- Doug

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7 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

You have to let the seductive magic of sailing do it's work.

Engines are more reliable, cleaner, quieter, BETTER, that ever before and fuel is has rarely been cheaper. Why would they NOT buy motorboats? OTOH if the idea is to have fun out on the water, sailing is fun.

FB- Doug

No argument here. I enjoy both. I won’t complain. I make my money off powerboaters, so life is good right now! :D

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16 hours ago, Ajax said:

If people are rushing out to buy boats,  they're buying the wrong ones. 

 

2 hours ago, Slim said:

This is my experience as well. We know a few families that bought small powerboats this summer, after never really expressing an interest in boating before.

I think a lot are responding to Covid 19 by buying boats they never would otherwise have bought.

Some may take to boating. A lot will realize there were reasons they never went boating before.

In the larger boats (i.e. could be chartered) this is happening when used supply has been curtailed by a few of last year's hurricanes.

The increased demand and constrained supply is doing what economists would predict, supporting prices.

I could easily see those that rushed into something that was not for them and the longer run C-19 impact on the economy leading to a drop in pricing...in a season or two. But then I’ve predicted 8 of the last 4 recessions

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3 hours ago, Monkey said:

The problem is that the boom is heavily driven by first time boat owners buying small runabouts, fishing boats, or pontoon boats. They want to get out on the water right away and not spend the time learning how to sail. 

I think that part of it is that there are many people who have not had a negative impact in their finances and many of them are used to taking a family vacation every summer.  With everything being shut down they have that $$ sitting there and it makes a nice down payment on a small boat bringing the monthly payment down to something they think they can afford.  I give it a year and a bunch of them will be on the market as those people start seeing the maintenance costs of ownership or they look at those payments every month in the winter and see they are not getting any enjoyment out of the $$.  

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10 minutes ago, rockb said:

I think that part of it is that there are many people who have not had a negative impact in their finances and many of them are used to taking a family vacation every summer.  With everything being shut down they have that $$ sitting there and it makes a nice down payment on a small boat bringing the monthly payment down to something they think they can afford.  I give it a year and a bunch of them will be on the market as those people start seeing the maintenance costs of ownership or they look at those payments every month in the winter and see they are not getting any enjoyment out of the $$.  

I agree. I'm one of those people who haven't been financially impacted and I have a nice pile of cash growing...except that I'm paranoid that the other shoe is going to drop and I'll be laid off later on as a lagging indicator.

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2 minutes ago, Ajax said:

I agree. I'm one of those people who haven't been financially impacted and I have a nice pile of cash growing...except that I'm paranoid that the other shoe is going to drop and I'll be laid off later on as a lagging indicator.

Me too.  Only difference for me is instead of a 40 min commute I now have a 40 second commute.  Had some cash reserves and got in when the market went down so am looking at some decent returns as of right now but believe it is really 50/50 as to which way things go in the next couple months.   

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I was looking at a few boats in the Tampa/St Pete area in July. All three brokers said their yacht market was completely dead for large 40-50 foot range used boats. Had been since the March shutdown. I think the market is moving in the smaller "starter" sailboats and ski boat types. Boats that you can get easily and take the fam out for a day on the water. Larger sailboats, maybe not so much. It certainly hasnt caused a depression in prices IMO.

 

.

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I’m selling everything and buying nothing for once. Plus, I’m so busy working on “new”boats that I can’t take a day off to get some rest. 2 days off since I got back from a boat delivery in Maine last month...now one this week and one in late September. There is a hot market and I can’t even get free time to offload my collection.

I am tired but not complaining at all. I am a very lucky person at this time in my life after so much pain and suffering last year!

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On 9/3/2020 at 12:56 PM, Monkey said:

No argument here. I enjoy both. I won’t complain. I make my money off powerboaters, so life is good right now! :D

I bought a little powerboat about a year ago.  I remember the very first time I took it out, still well in the honeymoon phase, thinking "this is fun, sure would be a nice day for a sail."

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55 minutes ago, efrank said:

I bought a little powerboat about a year ago.  I remember the very first time I took it out, still well in the honeymoon phase, thinking "this is fun, sure would be a nice day for a sail."

You’re not the first. The used boat market will be flooded next year. Can’t force anyone to enjoy certain things. 

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You guys think you're funny

I would love to buy a boat, but I have to sell two first. Not a money issue, it's room at the inn.

FB- Doug

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1 hour ago, Monkey said:

The used boat market will be flooded next year. Can’t force anyone to enjoy certain things. 

Powerboats and smallish pieces of 1/8" clear plexiglass are going to be a glut on the market next year.

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On 9/2/2020 at 3:20 PM, Navig8tor said:

Sure it’s not a Feadship?

Looks American, probably Burger. 

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This may be the first time I've logged back into SA since early March. COVID delivered more work than ever for me, and I've had my head down getting it done. I have been able, when the weather has been good, to enjoy a number of good weekend sailing days since March.

My question is this:  What do you think will happen to the used sailboat market (specifically to well-kept 1980s offshore cruisers in the 40-45' range) during the next 12 months?  Will it seasonally drop through the winter, and rebound in the spring?  Will it collapse as everything goes to Hell in a handbasket?

It seems like this particular sub-market has had less of a lift during this boat craze.  I am interested in finally moving up, at this stage of my life, to a boat that can help live the dream.  At the same time, I share the concern expressed above about the possibility of a personal reversal of fortune, along with not wanting to buy high just before a collapse.  Soothsayers please comment on the future.

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Everyone is, indeed, buying boats. Sold my Catalina 30 last month within 10 days of listing her on Craigslist for asking, with 2-3 others next in line willing to apparently do the same. 

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Things look grim in the US, I think. Moratorium on evictions is ending and the money for PPP is gone. This could lead to a big lack of demand in the economy over-all, and that pain will trickle upwards.(For example, the biggest retail companies are making gains now, but what happens when consumers run out of money? Even the big boys will get hurt.)

BUT - Congress could act any day, and who knows what will come of the election? I'm assuming Congress will act, but who knows - the Fed has said basically, we are out of tricks, it's up to the legislature.

I am no economist and could be wrong about everything. Things are very weird. What if no one goes back to working in an office the majority of the time? Real estate market will turn inside out. Already happening in the cities. 

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21 minutes ago, Slim said:

Things are very weird.

Boy, howdy.

The commercial real estate market *will* turn inside out.  My wife and many people she knows have all been told that telework is the new normal. Office space will be greatly reduced and reconfigured to support periodic meetings rather than providing individual work space. She is a state gov't employee.

The savings in utility bills alone, will be massive. Consider this:  I will run my wood pellet stove 8-10 hours more each day this winter to heat my home while my wife is working. I will need to purchase an entire extra ton of fuel to support this. We used to shut it off at 7am and I would turn it on at 3pm when I returned home.  This is in addition to the extra electricity she consumes by being home 24/7.

Back to boats:

I think we'll see a repeat of the 2008 housing crash on a larger scale within a year.  Evictions will cause people to seek "alternative accommodations" in the form of derelict boats that will clog marinas and waterways.  Yards and marinas will happily sell the crappier abandoned boats that the "suddenly unemployed" abandoned in their yards for very cheap prices or may even give them away as long as the floating homeless promise to remove the boat from the premises.

This does not address @Israel Hands' question though.

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Who knows what the market will do.  I have a mariner 32 that we are looking to sell in the next few yrs as parents are getting older..  It is mint, but I convinced the rents to hold off..  (been trying to at least get it out there for years, but dad refused.) Reason was it is late in the season and with the crazy stuff going on, there is no way they can sell it for what they want, this late in the season.  Hopefully we can make something happen in the spring, but for now, I hope my thinking is sound...  

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Actually I was thinking that maybe I should put my Bene on the local market right now, because the sailing continues here in ENC.  It's in good shape and is right for the local waters.  

On the purchasing side, I have had my eye on a particular boat. I've looked at several similar boats during the summer. Owners just lowered the price and the broker said they are "ready to sell." But he also said that they will not go much lower than their new asking price. 

I am therefore in the position of either a)  offering $12-15K less than their price but likely having to pay within $5K of their asking price in order to buy it, or b) waiting at least 2 months and seeing if it sells in the meantime.  At that point I might well be able to buy it at $15K less than asking price, and I'll know if the world has turned into shit post-election.  (At the price it's now listed for, it may sell anyway, because it is a popular offshore model.  But of course it's not the last boat in the world.)

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And yet my marina just sent six boats out to be chopped up and crushed. A couple of them were trashers. The 1972 Islander Bahama Mk 1 was sure no trasher, but the Marina couldn't find a buyer for $500.

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I know boat launching activity and interest in boats for sale went high in the spring due to Covid, here in my sailing area. And it looks as though several boats have sold after checking local brokerages. 

Houses are selling at an increased rate though and higher prices. Some buyers have put deposits down based on smartphone videos from brokers without inspecting. 

Local schools are reporting an increase in enrollment(I've heard from newly enrolled families the increase looks big). 

More than a few 'summer' residents will be spending the winter 2020-21, many are second gen. with kids. 

Labor Day has come and gone and few left here, it seems.

Maines economy (no big machine,...), is bouncing back pretty strongly due to our Covid status, which is only behind #1 Vermont.

A friend from VT just sold his house, full price, and had at least 2 backups, less than a month on the market. 

Both my adult kids are moving back to Maine. Living away for over 10 years, NYC and Boston aren't as much fun(they liked it there but they think the new normal is here to stay). One is still working remotely out of Boston and he hasn't seen the office since he left in April. 

Car sales are up I read somewhere,...Heck yes, everyone is buying boats! If they can afford to re-locate due to Covid, they'll buy boats once we get our hands on them. 

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Similarly different, the market for campers, RVs and motor homes has gone completely  insane. Stopped at the dealership where my wife bought her very modest 13' camper last year a few days ago on the way home from a month long camping trip. The showroom, full with easily 15 top end large units in June was empty. Likewise the used camper lot.

The dealer was happy right now but fearful he won't be able to get replacement inventory for next year.

Strange days!

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I bought two sailboats in the last 12 months.  I guess that makes me part of this trend.  It was killing me not having a sailboat I could use during the early lockdown phase of covid.  The plan was to buy a small racing boat in partnership with my racing friends and a comfy cruising boat for SWMBO and myself.  

It was extremely hard to find a cruising boat in decent shape for a decent price.  I had an accepted offer on a boat in February but it turned out to be an osmosis farm on survey.  The boat I ended up buying seemed like a good deal but it does need a lot of work - the kind of work most people pay others to do, but all stuff that I have done before on my previous boat.  Being retired helps a lot.

OTOH there seem to be a ton of 40'+ offshore cruising boats being advertised on-line in the USA/Mexico for decent prices.  If I wanted a larger boat like that or wanted to go offshore, this would be a good time to buy.

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On 9/3/2020 at 1:59 PM, Ajax said:

I agree. I'm one of those people who haven't been financially impacted and I have a nice pile of cash growing...except that I'm paranoid that the other shoe is going to drop and I'll be laid off later on as a lagging indicator.

This year's paranoid is next year's common sense. 

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Data point- recently widowed friend sold their boat... having only known them more recently, I did not realize the extent of their cruising life together, and had made the mistake of thinking of it as "his" boat.... before it even listed. We were helping her get personal items off it, this morning.

1990s-era Catalina 34, relatively up to date. No idea what price range. Not my cup of tea but practical.

FB- Doug

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2 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

Data point- recently widowed friend sold their boat... having only known them more recently, I did not realize the extent of their cruising life together, and had made the mistake of thinking of it as "his" boat.... before it even listed. We were helping her get personal items off it, this morning.

1990s-era Catalina 34, relatively up to date. No idea what price range. Not my cup of tea but practical.

FB- Doug

The Catalina 32/34/36 can be a lot of boat for the money. 

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8 minutes ago, IStream said:

The Catalina 32/34/36 can be a lot of boat for the money. 

You should put the 30 in there as well. I am still amazed at how much volume a Catalina 30 has, compared to my previous Pearson 30 and they can be had for very reasonable prices.

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33 minutes ago, Ajax said:

You should put the 30 in there as well. I am still amazed at how much volume a Catalina 30 has, compared to my previous Pearson 30 and they can be had for very reasonable prices.

For sure - after a fairly comprehensive trawl, it was the smallest boat I could stand up in & fit in both berths. Didn't feel like only 30' loa. 

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What's really impressive about all the Catalina products is the level of builder/mfg support. 

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Yup. They've figured out the formula for "not great in any one way but pretty good in all of them", including customer support.

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10 minutes ago, Elegua said:

What's really impressive about all the Catalina products is the level of builder/mfg support. 

Tartan could take a lesson from them.

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11 minutes ago, Ajax said:
22 minutes ago, Elegua said:

What's really impressive about all the Catalina products is the level of builder/mfg support. 

Tartan could take a lesson from them.

Well, to be slightly fair to them, Tartan is not the same company that built your boat. They wanted the public reputation that came with the name, and as good capitalists I assume they paid the lowest possible price for it.

FB- Doug

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1 hour ago, IStream said:

The Catalina 32/34/36 can be a lot of boat for the money. 

a lot of boat for the money is one of the most frightening phrases in the sailing world

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9 minutes ago, dylan winter said:
1 hour ago, IStream said:

The Catalina 32/34/36 can be a lot of boat for the money. 

a lot of boat for the money is one of the most frightening phrases in the sailing world

That, and cruising to a schedule

FB- Doug

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BUT - 80's offshore boats in the 40-45 foot range? Seems specific enough that it will all come down to the boat/buyer rather than the macro outlook for the economy.

I'm picturing a Baba 40 or something like that.

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I've got a buddy with a Nauticat 44 in decent condition for sale at a very reasonable price. Steady stream of nibbles but no bites yet. 

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3 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

That, and cruising to a schedule

FB- Doug

I have heard it said that the most dangerous thing on a boat is a calendar

D

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3 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

That, and cruising to a schedule

FB- Doug

There is a saying in aviation that the most dangerous thing on an airplane is a calendar. 

 

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19 hours ago, Willin' said:

Similarly different, the market for campers, RVs and motor homes has gone completely  insane. Stopped at the dealership where my wife bought her very modest 13' camper last year a few days ago on the way home from a month long camping trip. The showroom, full with easily 15 top end large units in June was empty. Likewise the used camper lot.

The dealer was happy right now but fearful he won't be able to get replacement inventory for next year.

Strange days!

The RV market has gone nuts. I know someone who bought one a few weeks back. Shopping for used RV's was crazy - dealers had very little inventory in used ones, and things would come and go off the Craiglists/Facebook Marketplace type listings in a day or two, sometimes it seemed like in hours. The one he eventually bought, he was the first and only person to look at.

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3 hours ago, IStream said:

I've got a buddy with a Nauticat 44 in decent condition for sale at a very reasonable price. Steady stream of nibbles but no bites yet. 

Based on the activity on our boat here in NZ, had people been able to come here to get it (or see it) I'm guessing we would have had more than nibbles. We've done live virtual walk-through showings with people outside the country, etc. and there have been a good number of serious inquiries.

None of whom can get to the boat yet...

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That must be frustrating. 
 

I always thought “free” boats were the most scary. Price is zero so value must be infinite. 
aVYYM2y_700b.jpg

 

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I had never seen one of those until fairly recently.

They look like some sort of time portal.

image.thumb.png.661d2cda480dbcf9e0c01706501c0798.png

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Went in a power boat dealer in Newburg, MD today looking for a part.  I was thinking he was going out of business, no he sold every boat he had, never before.  The place was empty except for a happy owner and some mechanics.  Has boats on back order.

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35 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

I had never seen one of those until fairly recently.

They look like some sort of time portal.

image.thumb.png.661d2cda480dbcf9e0c01706501c0798.png

That looks big enough to be a threat to small boats... kayaks, paddleboards... probably not sailboats unless there is a lot of rain upstream.

But that kind of pipe outfall is pretty common on lakes. Usually there is some kind of crenelation or projections coming up around the rim. It both helps control flow rate and makes it less likely that stuff you don't want going in there, goes in there.

FB- Doug

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Listed my Melges 20 (not exactly a "cruisy" type of boat) on Aug 10th.  Closed yesterday and new owner drove it away.  Just over 1 month.

He is selling a racer cruiser (C&C29) - too slow and I'm selling a racer to get something we can race and cruise.

Not much inventory out there, hopefully more shows up as haulout approaches up in the Great White North.

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On 9/17/2020 at 2:12 PM, Ajax said:

I think we'll see a repeat of the 2008 housing crash on a larger scale within a year.  Evictions will cause people to seek "alternative accommodations" in the form of derelict boats that will clog marinas and waterways. 

Ajax, I hope you're wrong on this. I fear that mass evictions and hunger could result in civil unrest. I hope Congress comes up with an extension of relief soon.

OK, back to sail boats.

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friend of mine is a broker here in maine and thats what I've heard from her as well. 25ft and under motorboats  and 30ft and under sails boats have been selling faster than she's ever seen before. 

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Outdoor recreational assets are flying off the shelves and it's not just boats or RVs.  In some places you need to hunt for that Big Green Egg, patio heater or outdoor fireplace.  People are reallocating their vacation budgets because they're not travelling this year or maybe even next.  I have friends whose travel plans were cancelled so they redid their patio so that it can be used for deep into a New England Fall and early Spring. 

I'm not yet in the market for a boat but might be in 2-3 years when the market gets flooded by all of the 2020 purchases.    Will need a good surveyor because a lot of first time boat owners are buying more boat than they know how to own.

With people full time remote and with the resources, you're going to see a lot of relocation as well. Case in point, one college friend of mine, his whole family will be remote this year be it work or school.  So they spent a chunk of their summer living aboard their J/44 and are now in Killington, VT for the winter instead of being cooped up in the Mid-Atlantic this winter.  Other New England folks I know are looking at renting in Florida for a month or two just to survive being cooped up inside this winter.  

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So a decent, rebuilt, much loved Mariner 32 in the 1000 islands.  Mint condition for those who love wood, but want a fiberglas hull.  On the hard now, masts newly varnished and put to bed...  Boat loved by my parents for the last 30 yrs..  They are contemplating going back in next yr or so (depending on dad's health) spent most of the time in B&B's this summer so this is a serious question...  

 

Put it on the market now??  Or wait till next spring.  Remember the 1000 islands..  Upstate NY...  Is the market still strong or??  

Thanks in advance...  

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On 9/18/2020 at 12:59 PM, Slim said:

BUT - 80's offshore boats in the 40-45 foot range? Seems specific enough that it will all come down to the boat/buyer rather than the macro outlook for the economy.

I'm picturing a Baba 40 or something like that.

In this specific niche, the market seems to have remained the same as far as I can tell.  (Basing this in part on actual selling prices of a particular make during the past 4 years.) 

Probably best to at least wait until just after the election.  I'm afraid that @Ajax and @Bull City may both be right in their forecasts. That'll upend the market on everything.

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Just talked to one of the Turner fam... apparently they are stacking up several boats to scrap. They are all leaners, so I don’t know what they are.  A couple were in the water, and some on the hard. I guess they were abandoned for derelict rent
 

contact:

http://turnermarine.com/

 

probably want to talk to Roger or Prince

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On 9/23/2020 at 5:04 PM, Max Rockatansky said:

Come on down to Turner Marine in Mobile Alabama. There is a Vagabond gonna be cut up, they couldn’t give it away

Wow. I sold my 1979 Vagabond 47 for full ask in 12 hours on craigslist Saturday. Got 17 inquires. First guy to see it bought it. A sellers market I guess. 

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Neighbor around the corner just sold his house to the first person who looked at it. Long time friend retired and is moving back to the part of the state he is from.  4 days to sell the house.

Brokerage listings around here are pretty thin. Kind of looking to get back in the game.  Saw a listing for a Beneteau 33.7 that looked interesting.  But the logistics , in our COVID 19 world, were more than I wanted to deal with.  Boat sold after owners dropped the price by about $5k.  

 

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On 9/1/2020 at 7:51 PM, Roleur said:

We just sold our boat.  It was on the market for 3 months before we had a nice offer.  Then it took 7 weeks to close.  Everything about the closing process took longer than normal.  In contrast we bought a boat in late February.  Process took less than 2 weeks.  

I'm finding the same thing trying to sell my Catalina 42 which is very well equipped for racing (yes it's possible). 

Everybody says the market is hot, but perhaps slower than expected in the ~40 foot range.

It could also be that the potential US-based buyers can't get to Canada.

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1 hour ago, gspot said:

It could also be that the potential US-based buyers can't get to Canada.

This.

Clean 42's are always in high demand if your pricing is reasonable. Regarding that, I suspect most people are looking to use them as cruisers so a big sail inventory and racing gear may not add much pricing power. 

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2 hours ago, gspot said:

I'm finding the same thing trying to sell my Catalina 42 which is very well equipped for racing (yes it's possible). 

Everybody says the market is hot, but perhaps slower than expected in the ~40 foot range.

It could also be that the potential US-based buyers can't get to Canada.

I should have been more clear. The 3 months on the market were quite reasonable.  The entire state was on lock down for half of that.  It was the 7 weeks to close that I found surprising.  And yes we did have a potential buyer in Canada that could never get to the boat. 

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Thanks for clarifying - the three months is reasonable especially if the state was locked down for half of that. 
 

The seven weeks to close sounds excessive but my broker says closing times are longer now due to long wait times for surveys.

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49 minutes ago, gspot said:

The seven weeks to close sounds excessive but my broker says closing times are longer now due to long wait times for surveys.

I recently needed an insurance survey - got it the next day.

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An insurance survey might take a couple of hours on site and an hour to write up. A thorough pre-purchase survey can take the better part of a day on 35 - 40 footer... Just sayin'.

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I thought for sure that COVID was going to kill the boating industry, but everyone I know in the business says they have NEVER been busier.   That's great news I think.  My broker says that he has been receiving HIGHER than ask on many of the boats. I also thought having no boat shows was going to hurt the manufacturers, and now I hear there are waitlists for new boats.  Longer delay times to receive your newly ordered boat.

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On 9/23/2020 at 1:37 PM, shaggy said:

So a decent, rebuilt, much loved Mariner 32 in the 1000 islands.  Mint condition for those who love wood, but want a fiberglas hull.  On the hard now, masts newly varnished and put to bed...  Boat loved by my parents for the last 30 yrs..  They are contemplating going back in next yr or so (depending on dad's health) spent most of the time in B&B's this summer so this is a serious question...  

 

Put it on the market now??  Or wait till next spring.  Remember the 1000 islands..  Upstate NY...  Is the market still strong or??  

Thanks in advance...  

If you wan to sell, put it on the market and see what happens. A buddy of mine just sold his C&C 29, in Ottawa in a matter of days

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10 hours ago, py26129 said:

If you wan to sell, put it on the market and see what happens. A buddy of mine just sold his C&C 29, in Ottawa in a matter of days

Age old conundrum..  Dad wants to keep on keeping on, and mom wants to....... well, it's mom...  :)

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Our marina always had many empty slips. Not any longer. And people are using their boats! Mostly to hang out on, though. I know it will change again, and I am also debating putting my boat up for sale. Maybe start with a high price to see what happens...

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Wow, all the boys say COVID is good for business?

Just came back from a trip and one usually busy marina in North Queensland is 40% capacity.

Some of you guys are just talking it up, standard industry tactic.  Real Estate vipers do it too.

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Our insurer is “ reviewing” coverage of  boats kept north of Noosa, and I am sure they are not alone.

 

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