Jump to content

When offered the Vaccine, will you take it?


Recommended Posts

Shit's getting real over here in WA state. Many of the vaccination sites are converting from appointment only to walk-up, all the major universities are mandating vaccinations for their students (and probably eventually for the staff, but not yet), and the Governor is floating the idea of tying the opening phases of the various counties to the percentage vaccinated rather than to case levels. 

It seems that the trend is slowly but surely to establish social consequences for the socially irresponsible among us and I am here for all of it.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 1.1k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

The private sector has embarked on a major campaign to reassure the public that they will not release a vaccine until they are confident it is safe and effective. We can expect a joint statement from

Had my first one on Saturday 

I am a PhD Bioengineer, a serial entrepreneur, and affiliate faculty at a large public university. I dearly want there to be a safe and effective vaccine as soon as possible. I also believe that the C

Posted Images

On 5/3/2021 at 9:14 AM, Al Paca said:

I get my 2nd Pfizer shot in about an hour. How long before that nano chip kicks in? 

It’s been 24 hrs. If anything a very, very slight lightheaded feeling.  Gonna stay home from work and get my taxes together. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/3/2021 at 2:15 PM, Kate short for Bob said:

Then wrap yourself in cling wrap, hermetically seal your house and get food delivered.

Make sure your TV can split screen CNN and MSN.

Did you stop to think that the reason you didn't die from Covid-19 is because even though it was "rampant" through your community is because you may have had some prior immunity or you had it and didn't know it (like the majority of people) or it isn't as contagious as you think it is?

Did you stop to think that it was because she took all the  recommended precautions to protect herself?

Do you stop to think about anything?

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, accnick said:

Did you stop to think that it was because she took all the  recommended precautions to protect herself?

Do you stop to think about anything?

 

Certainly don't wait for the Government to tell me what to think.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Local community is 43% two doses and 55% single dose (pop over 16 years old), we are slowly getting there. Sadly, just over 70% fully vaccinated for folk over 65 and hence we still have deaths among those stupid enough not to get vaccinated. Most cases now are in younger people, and while few of them die, some are still ending up in hospital. 

State of Illinois has now decided that rate of immunization as well as case levels and hospitalization percentages will determine re-opening. But trends are all positive so we should move to next level of opening next week, and hopefully fully open next month.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/4/2021 at 10:52 AM, Al Paca said:

It’s been 24 hrs. If anything a very, very slight lightheaded feeling.  Gonna stay home from work and get my taxes together. 

Got my second Pfizer shot on Thursday.  24 hours later I had the worst headache of my life.  Now I'm on day 2 and the headache is still there, though thankfully not as severe.  I've got my fingers crossed that the side effects only last the 48 hours I hear so much about.  

The first time I went to the vaccination center, there were hundreds of people in line ahead of me.  The second time it was a ghost town and I was able to walk right in.  

Hopefully that was just coincidence, and not validation of the stories I've read about fewer and fewer people getting their second injection.  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Here in the UK we so far we've about 58% of adults having had 1 jab, 26% having had 2 jabs. Every one should have been offered their first jab by the end of July , the second by the end of September.

The local area due to our high average age, has had 72% having had at least 1 jab, 35% 2 jabs. Our second is on Thursday. Pfizer only had sore arm after the first one.

The projections indicate a 94% final take up rate.

Our county of 2074 square miles has a covid rate of just under 15 per 100,000 people, but the local area the sailing club is in, 371 square miles, has  just 6 per 100,000 and no deaths for several weeks.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

My employer gave us an incentive (8 hours paid time off) to show proof of full vaccination with a deadline of Sep.

The only person I know who is too tin-hat to take advantage of something like that would be my mother in-law but my wife assures me that she was sane before she retired and went full FQX News.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Teener said:

My employer gave us an incentive (8 hours paid time off) to show proof of full vaccination with a deadline of Sep.

The only person I know who is too tin-hat to take advantage of something like that would be my mother in-law but my wife assures me that she was sane before she retired and went full FQX News.

That is another example of a good idea.  Its using the carrot not the stick so it doesn't feel quite as oppressive or coercive but achieves the desired outcome.

Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, Tharsheblows said:

That is another example of a good idea.  Its using the carrot not the stick so it doesn't feel quite as oppressive or coercive but achieves the desired outcome.

Agreed, but it's a shame you have to bribe some people to get them to do the right thing.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Teener said:

My employer gave us an incentive (8 hours paid time off) to show proof of full vaccination with a deadline of Sep.

The only person I know who is too tin-hat to take advantage of something like that would be my mother in-law but my wife assures me that she was sane before she retired and went full FQX News.

My employer did similar, but unleashed a new weapon today. We intend to keep the mask requirement for at least another six months. However, anyone who stops by HR and shows proof that they’re fully vaccinated (plus two weeks) can get a sticker to go on their ID badge. If you’ve got the sticker, no mask required. So now they’re offering the carrot and the stick. I like it. 

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, accnick said:

Agreed, but it's a shame you have to bribe some people to get them to do the right thing.

Yes, but the softer approach is good for a few reasons.  First, it is your assumption that it is the “right thing.”  (Which is probably a good assumption).

But there are many people in the world with various different conditions and situations which might make it not “the right thing.”  It certainly was not the “right thing” for those very, very few people that were healthy until they died of blood clots caused by the vaccines.

Also, many young people may feel that the vaccine is a bigger threat to their personal health than the virus.  (You may reply that they should do it for others but you must remember that in the US we have a fundamental right to bodily integrity) 

By offering incentives instead of mandates companies/governments are getting voluntary cooperation without unleashing their inner Musolini.

And it is also allowing those who feel strongly against the vaccine the option to continuing to take other precautions.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Tharsheblows said:

Yes, but the softer approach is good for a few reasons.  First, it is your assumption that it is the “right thing.”  (Which is probably a good assumption).

But there are many people in the world with various different conditions and situations which might make it not “the right thing.”  It certainly was not the “right thing” for those very, very few people that were healthy until they died of blood clots caused by the vaccines.

Also, many young people may feel that the vaccine is a bigger threat to their personal health than the virus.  (You may reply that they should do it for others but you must remember that in the US we have a fundamental right to bodily integrity) 

By offering incentives instead of mandates companies/governments are getting voluntary cooperation without unleashing their inner Musolini.

And it is also allowing those who feel strongly against the vaccine the option to continuing to take other precautions.

 

Yep, and I’m ok with that. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

 (You may reply that they should do it for others but you must remember that in the US we have a fundamental right to bodily integrity) 

I wonder what the Venn digram of bodily integrity vaccine refusers and bodily integrity right to choosers looks like. 

But what about the OTHER LIFE?  Yeah, exactly.  Externalities can be inconvenient. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, NeedAClew said:

 (You may reply that they should do it for others but you must remember that in the US we have a fundamental right to bodily integrity) 

I wonder what the Venn digram of bodily integrity vaccine refusers and bodily integrity right to choosers looks like. 

But what about the OTHER LIFE?  Yeah, exactly.  Externalities can be inconvenient. 

lol, exactly!  Its precisely the same argument but many parties are on the polar opposite sides depending on the subject matter.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.pbs.org/video/vaccines-huvzkv/

This is a documentary on how vaccines came about with the history of the smallpox one including an effective treatment before Jenner's, then how the resistance to getting it was overcome (Thomas Jefferson tried it out on his slaves first).  Some time is spent on the improvements up to the current ones and how they could go  so quickly.  It ends with how we as a world ended smallpox and what it took to get there. Now, covid could be ended the same way but unless the anti-vaxxers and those hesitant don't do it it's going to be here for a long time and as it circulates it will continue to mutate.

Not getting vaccinated? Enjoy being a self centered entitled prick while much of the world would do anything to take your place.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, d'ranger said:

https://www.pbs.org/video/vaccines-huvzkv/

This is a documentary on how vaccines came about with the history of the smallpox one including an effective treatment before Jenner's, then how the resistance to getting it was overcome (Thomas Jefferson tried it out on his slaves first).  Some time is spent on the improvements up to the current ones and how they could go  so quickly.  It ends with how we as a world ended smallpox and what it took to get there. Now, covid could be ended the same way but unless the anti-vaxxers and those hesitant don't do it it's going to be here for a long time and as it circulates it will continue to mutate.

Not getting vaccinated? Enjoy being a self centered entitled prick while much of the world would do anything to take your place.

Except that smallpox used to kill almost 30% of the people who caught it, many of whom were children and young adults and COVID kills about .5% (or less) of the people who catch it and almost none of the fatalities are children and young adults...so the numbers are dramatically different.

That said, science is much better now so the "risks" associated with the vaccine are much less too.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, NeedAClew said:

But what about the OTHER LIFE?  Yeah, exactly.  Externalities can be inconvenient. 

But if Bob chooses to have a vaccine and Kate doesn't is there really an externality involved?

Does Kate not getting vaccinated harm Bob?

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Tharsheblows said:

Except that smallpox used to kill almost 30% of the people who caught it, many of whom were children and young adults and COVID kills about .5% (or less) of the people who catch it and almost none of the fatalities are children and young adults...so the numbers are dramatically different.

That said, science is much better now to the "risks" associated with the vaccine are much less too.

Smallpox was a huge psychological issue because of facial scarring. Sounds dumb but humans are driven by vanity. NOBODY wanted to risk smallpox, it made you ugly... killing you might actually be preferable.

The problem with risk assessment is two fold IMHO.... one, many people who are smart about many things are still bad at math, or more likely (for the truly smart ones) they don't apply math. They jump to a conclusion and then exert effort justifying it.

Is the risk of the vaccine comparable to the risk of the disease? Obviously not, by a HUGE margin. So how come more people are not convinced by simple rational demonstrations of this?

They think there is a comparison of getting vaccinated versus not getting vaccinated, instead of thinking of it in terms of getting vaccinated versus catching the disease.

- DSK

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

They think there is a comparison of getting vaccinated versus not getting vaccinated, instead of thinking of it in terms of getting vaccinated versus catching the disease.

 

Some may think that but many are thinking in terms of - getting vaccinated versus catching a disease that is unlikely to cause them harm.  So a 70 year old obese person suffering from diabetes has a different risk profile to a 25 year old fit and healthy individual.

Similar to an already immune compromised person they have to weigh the possibility that getting vaccinated may precipitate an adverse reaction vs the chances of getting the disease.

In the latter example someone getting vaccinated has the same effect as someone catching the disease as both have helped progress towards herd immunity.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The risk is that if the virus is not eradicated it will mutate. Nobody knows what those mutations might entail. We have the technology to eradicate it, now we just need the will to do it.  Tonight I had dinner at a restaurant with friends (sat outside) because we are all vaccinated. I would like this to be normal again. I am racing again (doing the shoe regatta this weekend) because we are vaccinated.

If not it will continue to impact those who are most vulnerable and/or less fortunate. Get it and get your friends to do so as well.  Watch the video, it's science, not rocket science. Don't be Mikey.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Kate short for Bob said:

Some may think that but many are thinking in terms of - getting vaccinated versus catching a disease that is unlikely to cause them harm. ...

How many of the same people ran out to buy gas at $7/gal when already had enough in their tank to get thru the week?

These people are stupid as fuck and deserve ridicule. So do you.

 

1 minute ago, d'ranger said:

... ... it's science, not rocket science. Don't be Mikey.

Good advice on any topic

- DSK

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, d'ranger said:

The risk is that if the virus is not eradicated it will mutate.

You assume that the virus can be eradicated.  80 years we haven't eradicated influenza and I think it took 20 years to eradicate small pox although the first vaccine was developed in 1796.  Polio hasn't been eradicated yet.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

How many of the same people ran out to buy gas at $7/gal when already had enough in their tank to get thru the week?

The same people that filled their boot with toilet paper when stay in place orders were issued.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Y'all do realize there is a big difference between the standards for an EUA vs an approval right?  And that not all on the Expert Panel voted for the EUA?  And that this is the shortest timeline in terms of a safety database for a vaccine by like miles... and that the mortality risk for somebody not old is like similar to getting killed in a lighting strike?

Very glad my parents got vaccinated  .Not surprised or offended in the least that many of the young want nothing to do with it.  Don't blame them at all. 

My gosh y'all are so black and white.  Many shades of grey here IMHO.

  • Downvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Kate short for Bob said:

You assume that the virus can be eradicated.  80 years we haven't eradicated influenza and I think it took 20 years to eradicate small pox although the first vaccine was developed in 1796.  Polio hasn't been eradicated yet.  

There are plenty of good reasons to get the vaccine but eradicating COVID for planet Earth is not one of them.  That will not likely ever happen.  Only about 60-70% of the first world countries want the vaccine now and we will soon learn that if you got the vaccine over a year ago you will need another.  The annual or semi-annual booster program will likely have even less participation becasue by then the COVID death rates will be much lower because most of the vulnerable people will be vaccinated and treatments will also be better. 

Then there is the third world.  It took decades to get very basic one-time vaccines (like small pox and polio) to the whole third world.  There is no way we are going to be able to vaccinate the entire third world, every year.

And the final nail in the coffin will likely be when companies and countries decide to step up the coercive tactics to persuade people who are on the fence about the vaccine.  This will likely solidify opposition making high vaccine rates impossible to ever achieve.

That said, COVID death rates will likely go way down and the vaccines will have played a major role in that good result.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My hope is that this coronavirus will become like several others that are now part of the variety that cause the common cold, generally affecting only kids who then largely become immune. The worry, however, is that this coronavirus has more widespread and severe effects in human bodies than those that today cause colds. Maybe the cold viruses started out as nasty viruses like this one, hundreds to thousands of years ago, and then evolved into the relatively benign forms we tolerate today without much problem. Meanwhile it is a worthwhile goal to try to get to herd immunity, at least so societies can return to relatively normal activities, and in this context the covidiots who refuse immunization just because of their political or other bizarre beliefs are being jerks who are holding us all back.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

As long as they keep making updated vaccines I am happy to pay for them, out of pocket or via taxes. It's the only way I see to take care of me given the realities.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/19/2021 at 12:17 PM, Sail4beer said:

Just got my 2nd Moderna vaccination. I hope it helps us.

The thundering herd applauds . .  

though it is a bit hard to do that with these pesky hooves.  

The Thundering Herd (1933) - IMDb

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Announcements


×
×
  • Create New...