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Jules Verne Trophy 2020


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8 minutes ago, stief said:

I wish, or at least hope the vid automatically shows Closed Captions (FR). By the time I do the  5-7 click hell (Turning on the CC, going to settings and turning on the Auto translate, then getting the submenu to change language, scrolling to find English, and not making a mistake and restarting), the vid is usually done. Caaaaaaarefully I slide back to the start, et voilà! Several minutes of google-translate thinking wind noise is music. :lol:

Twenty times a day. But, enough of those times give some good info, and the visuals are woth it. And the tech keeps improving., so I keep clicking. Hell.

This ^^^^

'Sorry, you cannot add any more reactions today.'

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2 minutes ago, ivansh said:

I'm confused as to what exactly the axes and points are

Axes are lat and lon, points are (ais) reported positions. Labels are speed, course and age of each reported position at an instant the plot was generated - 15 mins ago.

Stray points are VG boats with weakish ais tx.

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Day 3 vid. I beat the game! Got the EN subtitles in only 5 clicks and 20 seconds. Hell, yeah.

More importantly, they are confident they are in the corridor that will make them down to the cold below the Hope

 

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14 minutes ago, Kenny Dumas said:

Time to buy more Sodebo!

Good idea--lunch time here, but when I asked for the nearest store  "0 STORE FOUND" in Canada. Oh well.

Lunch time? It's almost happy hour. My how time flies catching up. Will settle for the wine.

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Indeed they are onto the fringes of the low, however it is a monster with a massive area of high pressure in front of it, so I imagine they will race to the front edge of it and then get stuck, unable to break through to the low in front of it that the VG leaders are on. Things might change later in the Indian to give them a bridge to another low, but otherwise to overtake the VG field they will have to wait for all of them to fall off their low, and that doesn't look likely for a while.

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48 minutes ago, TheDragon said:

Indeed they are onto the fringes of the low, however it is a monster with a massive area of high pressure in front of it, so I imagine they will race to the front edge of it and then get stuck, unable to break through to the low in front of it that the VG leaders are on. Things might change later in the Indian to give them a bridge to another low, but otherwise to overtake the VG field they will have to wait for all of them to fall off their low, and that doesn't look likely for a while.

Also wonder if this might be the JVT where the dream of a boat that can jump to a low *ahead* is finally within reach. IIRC, that has been the major barrier to any big breakthroughs in the race record. 

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4 hours ago, stief said:

Also wonder if this might be the JVT where the dream of a boat that can jump to a low *ahead* is finally within reach. IIRC, that has been the major barrier to any big breakthroughs in the race record. 

Not sure they will need to do any "jump", according to forecast this low will move quite nicely at 750-800 nm a day. With that Sodebo could reach Good hope just when a bridge is forming, their window is just getting better especially now that they managed to catch the speedway. Won't be done until they reach France.

Positively impressed by their performance so far. It was probably the slowest and least reliable ultime during the Brest Atlantique. I guess refit did her good and then good sacrifices to Neptune (there is always a bit of luck for all the elements to fall at the right place). 

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36 minutes ago, stief said:

Sodebo makes sense, but the "marmite d’Olivier"? Shocking, I say, just shocking.. Marmite???!

Marmite in french is cauldron.

In this particular case (thanks Google) "La marmite d'Olivier" is a take away restaurant in Lorient.

Us french cannot stay french if we eat the english Marmite, it is not compatible with our citizenship...

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1 minute ago, Bebmoumoute said:

Marmite in french is cauldron.

In this particular case (thanks Google) "La marmite d'Olivier is a take away restaurant in Lorient.

Us french cannot stay french if we eat the english Marmite, it is not compatible with our citizenship...

True that. Can be fun noting cultural differences. Thought of adding  something about Vegemite to get the downunders in NZ and Australia going too. I had hoped Google would confirm  a vague memory about Andrew Cape, another great navigator who has worked with Nélias, and vegemite, but that only gave a mention of the British Marmite pots rolling around in the Fastnet. Quite entertaining.

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A long news report with the Sodebo team.

 

 

A few nuggets:

Thomas Coville expect to keep the same low pressure system all the way to Cape of Good Hope and maybe more.

He expects to be around CoGH after about 11days 10 hrs.

He hopes to be on par with IDEC time at the Kerguelen Islands; and after that, the forecast is still too fuzzy to make any realistic estimate.

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On 12/4/2020 at 8:37 AM, stief said:

Good idea--lunch time here, but when I asked for the nearest store  "0 STORE FOUND" in Canada. Oh well.

Lunch time? It's almost happy hour. My how time flies catching up. Will settle for the wine.

Haha it was a bit surreal seeing all those big brands that sponsor the variety of Offshore campaigns first hand in a service station on the FR motor!  Was heading just south of La Trinite to view a cruising Pogo40 which we ended up buying!  Pointing out to my old man (skiff sailor, very green on the FR offshore scene!) They sponsor an IMOCA, they sponsor an Ultims, they sponsor anothet IMOCA...

Played my part leaving with a Sodebo salad and some other patisserie/biscuit - St Micheal??!!

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9 hours ago, plugger said:

Haha it was a bit surreal seeing all those big brands that sponsor the variety of Offshore campaigns first hand in a service station on the FR motor!  Was heading just south of La Trinite to view a cruising Pogo40 which we ended up buying!  Pointing out to my old man (skiff sailor, very green on the FR offshore scene!) They sponsor an IMOCA, they sponsor an Ultims, they sponsor anothet IMOCA...

Played my part leaving with a Sodebo salad and some other patisserie/biscuit - St Micheal??!!

You can always spot a branch of Banque Populaire, they all have big photos of the trimaran or the IMOCA on the windows on the west coast.

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Locked and loaded for the next stage:  Cape Hope and Aiguilles crossing expected Monday on day 12.

They're at 10d 7 hrs now. Passage records to beat:

Skipper Date Equator Good

Hope

Cape

Agulhas

           
Loïck Peyron 2011 5 d 14 h 55 min 11 d 21 h 48 min 11 d 23 h 49 min

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jules_Verne_Trophy

 

Quote

Jean-Luc Nélias summarized Friday's weekend program in his daily weather report: "From tonight, the speed race begins. And indeed, for several hours, Sodebo Ultim 3, after finishing the bypass by the west of the St. Helena high, has considerably lengthened the tread. This Saturday morning, his average over the last 24 hours is 34.2 knots and this long speed edge in the 40th, port tack in front of a depression, will last a few more days, until the Kerguelen. Previously, the crew will have switched to the Indian Ocean at Cap des Aiguilles, the southernmost point in South Africa located after Good Hope on Monday morning, in about 12 days, the objective from Ouessant on November 25.

In anticipation of the Great South, boat captain François Duguet is confident about Sodebo Ultim 3's ability to take advantage of these days at full speed: "I have no apprehension, the boat is ready, the crew too, I can't wait to go. Responsible for technically monitoring the trimaran, the 39-year-old sailor has, by his own admission, not had much to do on this side since the departure a little over 10 days ago: "For the first 4-5 days, I didn't even open the toolbox. Then, we took advantage of the crossing of the Pot-au-noir to do some DIY, but it was mainly preventive and safety. What does he look at first when he does a "check" of the boat?

"First of all, everything that is rigging: boom, guying mast, anchorage. After the connecting arms, the structure below to see if there is no impact; finally, the steering transmission systems and rudders. Basically, everything that is not visible from the life cell. "

https://tropheejulesverne.sodebo.com/actualites/sodebo-ultim-3-plein-pot/

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Sodebo going like a bat out of hell right now, 37 knots boatspeed in 16 knots of wind.

They blew right by the third chasing group of the VG and are now roughly 200 nm ahead (see arrow).

A question for Herman, any chance that  the low pressure system they're riding in front of will catch up to the LP to the east?

JVT-05-12-20-0800.png

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1 hour ago, silvestert said:

Huh... I do not know if this is only a glitch, but their speed dropped significantly... and they are heading almost DDW...

This shit is never fun because its always a question of did they just snag something on the foils and shut her down to dislodge? Did they break something? Having a bit of tea?

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14 minutes ago, stief said:

About two hours ago (tracker playback) they did a quick dodge south and then got back up to speed. 

Would be good if this wobble is a sign something like OSCAR worked

If Oscar is working then they would just bear away for a moment then come back up. They wouldn't make a noticeable on the tracker dive.

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1 minute ago, TPG said:

If Oscar is working then they would just bear away for a moment then come back up. They wouldn't make a noticeable on the tracker dive.

Likely, if we knew what system/procedure they use (was asked a few days ago).  OSCAR + avoidance /mainsheet release + dropping off the foils+ checking the seas + ??? before getting back up to flight might show on the tracker.

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4 minutes ago, stief said:

Likely, if we knew what system/procedure they use (was asked a few days ago).  OSCAR + avoidance /mainsheet release + dropping off the foils+ checking the seas + ??? before getting back up to flight might show on the tracker.

Same procedure as dodging a trap buoy, just with a tv telling you to dodge.

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4 hours ago, silvestert said:

I do not know if this was mentioned before, but Sodebo will have to speed up to have any chance of success...

IDEC Sport:

image.png.e8c5644e7421264e7e608422e711bb59.png

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IDEC_SPORT

They might just have a shot at that 24 hour record here. It would be amazing to see it pushed over 900

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I wonder how their decisions on avoiding ice risks will compare to VG's official ice limit.  If they're hoping to transition forward to the next LP, a deep south run might improve their odds of achieving that.

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Interesting bit where Coville discusses routing.

Nélias wants them to sail at 34/35 knots, they are a bot too fast, which is wny they only have the J2 up when Coville would like to have 1 reef in the main + J1. Discussions on where to position themselves relative to the front.

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Nice new video, with some light talk but also some discussion about weather and forecast for the coming days.

Once again, the automatic translate to English is jibberish. Maybe they will post it again later with a proper English subtitles, but here is my transcript.

 

Video by Martin Keruzoré, media man.

"Hello everybody! Live from the roaring forties; we have entered in the deep South a few hours ago. We have done our last jibe last night and since then we have very high speeds. The sea is flatish; we are on a treadmill, until the next jibe in a few days. Everything is fine on board, we have started to put on more layers and our fleece. (side note, just because it cracks me up: in French, the word "couche" means layer, as in "une couche de peinture"= a layer of paint. In this case, Martin is talking about adding layers of clothing because of the temperature drop.  BUT, it also means... diaper. The automatic translation from Youtube always get it wrong and translate that the crew is putting their diapers on...)

It is getting colder and there is fog on the horizon; we are sailing a bit blind... It is like a ghost train at night. Straight on, full blast... We hope it is going to continue on like this. Let me bring you to the rear part of the cockpit; our boss is going to give us a short weather brief for the coming hours/days."

Thomas Coville: "everything I am telling you is a bit complicated, because it depends on how fast we are going in relation to the front; Jean-Luc (Nelias) is expecting us to sail at 34-35 knots; for the past few hours we are above that speed. So it can shift a bit everything I am going to say now. The faster we go, the least amount of wind we have, and it delays further when the strong winds are coming in... And that is why we are not under J2 yet."

Thomas Rouxel asking: "do we take a reef first or not?"  ( the English automatic translation for this question is..... "Amorok"    :blink: WTF!!! )

Thomas Coville: "the plan is J2 first, but actually, I would rather do one reef and J1. ( the English automatic translation for this answer is..... "no my first me I like dogs"    :blink: WTF!!! ). So we keep power upfront, so if we speed up and the wind lightens up again, we are not under J2 and have to head up to keep the power on..."

François Duguet: "Lunch time ! It is a recipe in line with the weather, it is a Norwegian recipe, with fish and potatoes!"

Sam Goodchild: " It is not too cold yet, but each shift, we add a layer of clothing... But it is great right now, because the sea is flat so we can maintain really high speeds, heading South East; so it is perfect.   Yeah, I am eating a soup that nobody dared to try: chicken soup with croutons. It is too hot for now, so I have not tasted it yet, but it smells good! We will see."

Martin Keruzoré: "We continue sailing super fast, between 35 and 40 knots; pedal to the metal! See you later!"

 

 

EDIT: Bedmoumoute beats me to it...

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9 hours ago, silvestert said:

I do not know if this was mentioned before, but Sodebo will have to speed up to have any chance of success...

IDEC Sport:

image.png.e8c5644e7421264e7e608422e711bb59.png

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IDEC_SPORT

It will be interesting to see where Sodebo is at the Cape of Good Hope reference point.  Their relatively small 200 nm lead over IDEC allowed them to get on the “Southern Ocean Low Pressure Highway” a day prior to when IDEC did in 2016.  Sodebo are piling on some miles right now (as I write they are 525 nm ahead) … but Day 11 is when IDEC came alive are started putting up the unreal numbers highlighted below.

The crewed record to Cape of Good Hope is was not set by IDEC but by Loick Peyron in 2011 at 11 d 21 h 48.  The best time is Garbart’s (due to his amazing run in the South Atlantic) at 11 d 20 h 10 '.  IDEC was roughly 21 hours behind those times.

As I write this, Sodebo is over 1,150 nm from the Cape of Good Hope meridian.  The clock is at 10 days, 16 hours, 40 minutes.  At 800 miles a day, that is still over 30 hours to the Good Hope meridian.  So I don’t think that Sodebo will crush the Peyron/Gabart reference time.

I have been trying to calculate, as I have watched from my warm and safe couch, as Sodebo descends to the Southern Ocean, is how Sodebo is doing against Peyron/Gabart as a reference.  I remember IDEC was so far behind Peyron when they entered the Southern Ocean four years ago I didn’t think they had a real chance to break the record they ended up shattering.  My point is at least until this point on the course, IDEC was not the most compelling reference point.  Starting tomorrow, IDEC’s numbers are the numbers to beat.  Not only are the Southern Ocean numbers daunting, but Joyon’s Equator to Ushant time is the crewed record by 14 hours over Cammas in 2009 and 38 hours faster than Peyron’s time during his 2011 circumnavigation.

I am sure we all wish the Sodebo crew a safe a fast trip through the Southern Ocean.

 

Joyon’s Numbers (selected)

 

6 consecutive days at an average of 850.7 miles / 24 h (35.45 knots)

Cape Agulhas-Cape Leeuwin in 4 days 9 h 37 min 46 at an average speed of 35.08 knots over ground (3,705 miles) or 842 miles in 24 hours (6 days 8 min or 36% more for Loïck Peyron's previous record)

Cape Leeuwin - Cape Horn in 9 d 08 h 46 min (12 d 22 h 22 min or 38% more for Loïck Peyron's previous record)

 

Cape of Good Hope - Cape Horn in 13 d 20 h 13 min (19 d 00 h 31 min or 37% more for Loïck Peyron's previous record)

 

Indian Ocean: 5 d 21 h 7 min 45 s (WSSRC reference) (8 d 07 h 23 min or 41% more for Loïck Peyron during the 2011 record)

 

Pacific Ocean: 7 d 21 h 13 min 31 s (WSSRC reference) (10 d 15 h 07 min or 39% more for Loïck Peyron during the 2011 record)

 

North Atlantic return record: 5 d 19 h 21 min (7 d 10 h 58 min or 25% more for Loïck Peyron during the 2011 record)

 

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22 minutes ago, Laurent said:

Nice new video, with some light talk but also some discussion about weather and forecast for the coming days.

Once again, the automatic translate to English is jibberish. Maybe they will post it again later with a proper English subtitles, but here is my transcript.

 

Video by Martin Keruzoré, media man.

"Hello everybody! Live from the roaring forties; we have entered in the deep South a few hours ago. We have done our last jibe last night and since then we have very high speeds. The sea is flatish; we are on a treadmill, until the next jibe in a few days. Everything is fine on board, we have started to put on more layers and our fleece. (side note, just because it cracks me up: in French, the word "couche" means layer, as in "une couche de peinture"= a layer of paint. In this case, Martin is talking about adding layers of clothing because of the temperature drop.  BUT, it also means... diaper. The automatic translation from Youtube always get it wrong and translate that the crew is putting their diapers on...)

It is getting colder and there is fog on the horizon; we are sailing a bit blind... It is like a ghost train at night. Straight on, full blast... We hope it is going to continue on like this. Let me bring you to the rear part of the cockpit; our boss is going to give us a short weather brief for the coming hours/days."

Thomas Coville: "everything I am telling you is a bit complicated, because it depends on how fast we are going in relation to the front; Jean-Luc (Nelias) is expecting us to sail at 34-35 knots; for the past few hours we are above that speed. So it can shift a bit everything I am going to say now. The faster we go, the least amount of wind we have, and it delays further when the strong winds are coming in... And that is why we are not under J2 yet."

Thomas Rouxel asking: "do we take a reef first or not?"  ( the English automatic translation for this question is..... "Amorok"    :blink: WTF!!! )

Thomas Coville: "the plan is J2 first, but actually, I would rather do one reef and J1. ( the English automatic translation for this answer is..... "no my first me I like dogs"    :blink: WTF!!! ). So we keep power upfront, so if we speed up and the wind lightens up again, we are not under J2 and have to head up to keep the power on..."

François Duguet: "Lunch time ! It is a recipe in line with the weather, it is a Norwegian recipe, with fish and potatoes!"

Sam Goodchild: " It is not too cold yet, but each shift, we add a layer of clothing... But it is great right now, because the sea is flat so we can maintain really high speeds, heading South East; so it is perfect.   Yeah, I am eating a soup that nobody dared to try: chicken soup with croutons. It is too hot for now, so I have not tasted it yet, but it smells good! We will see."

Martin Keruzoré: "We continue sailing super fast, between 35 and 40 knots; pedal to the metal! See you later!"

 

 

EDIT: Bedmoumoute beats me to it...

Well you did a much better job !

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2 hours ago, Former MDR Vandal 1 said:

It will be interesting to see where Sodebo is at the Cape of Good Hope reference point.  Their relatively small 200 nm lead over IDEC allowed them to get on the “Southern Ocean Low Pressure Highway” a day prior to when IDEC did in 2016.  Sodebo are piling on some miles right now (as I write they are 525 nm ahead) … but Day 11 is when IDEC came alive are started putting up the unreal numbers highlighted below.

The crewed record to Cape of Good Hope is was not set by IDEC but by Loick Peyron in 2011 at 11 d 21 h 48.  The best time is Garbart’s (due to his amazing run in the South Atlantic) at 11 d 20 h 10 '.  IDEC was roughly 21 hours behind those times.

As I write this, Sodebo is over 1,150 nm from the Cape of Good Hope meridian.  The clock is at 10 days, 16 hours, 40 minutes.  At 800 miles a day, that is still over 30 hours to the Good Hope meridian.  So I don’t think that Sodebo will crush the Peyron/Gabart reference time.

I have been trying to calculate, as I have watched from my warm and safe couch, as Sodebo descends to the Southern Ocean, is how Sodebo is doing against Peyron/Gabart as a reference.  I remember IDEC was so far behind Peyron when they entered the Southern Ocean four years ago I didn’t think they had a real chance to break the record they ended up shattering.  My point is at least until this point on the course, IDEC was not the most compelling reference point.  Starting tomorrow, IDEC’s numbers are the numbers to beat.  Not only are the Southern Ocean numbers daunting, but Joyon’s Equator to Ushant time is the crewed record by 14 hours over Cammas in 2009 and 38 hours faster than Peyron’s time during his 2011 circumnavigation.

I am sure we all wish the Sodebo crew a safe a fast trip through the Southern Ocean.

 

Joyon’s Numbers (selected)

 

6 consecutive days at an average of 850.7 miles / 24 h (35.45 knots)

Cape Agulhas-Cape Leeuwin in 4 days 9 h 37 min 46 at an average speed of 35.08 knots over ground (3,705 miles) or 842 miles in 24 hours (6 days 8 min or 36% more for Loïck Peyron's previous record)

Cape Leeuwin - Cape Horn in 9 d 08 h 46 min (12 d 22 h 22 min or 38% more for Loïck Peyron's previous record)

 

Cape of Good Hope - Cape Horn in 13 d 20 h 13 min (19 d 00 h 31 min or 37% more for Loïck Peyron's previous record)

 

Indian Ocean: 5 d 21 h 7 min 45 s (WSSRC reference) (8 d 07 h 23 min or 41% more for Loïck Peyron during the 2011 record)

 

Pacific Ocean: 7 d 21 h 13 min 31 s (WSSRC reference) (10 d 15 h 07 min or 39% more for Loïck Peyron during the 2011 record)

 

North Atlantic return record: 5 d 19 h 21 min (7 d 10 h 58 min or 25% more for Loïck Peyron during the 2011 record)

 

4 years passed by and still those Idec's numbers are amazing. Specially for an old man with an old boat (non foiler). Hard to beat. We will see in one week

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1 hour ago, bonox said:

4 years passed by and still those Idec's numbers are amazing. Specially for an old man with an old boat (non foiler). Hard to beat. We will see in one week

Sodebo will basically have to show another gear that they have not yet had a chance to demonstrate.  I thought that a much more modern crewed foiler would be comfortably ahead of the fastest reference times at this point so that they would only have to match the IDEC Southern Ocean numbers.  Right now Sodebo  are showing 850 nm over the last 24 hours with a 562 nm lead.  They will certainly have to reel off several 890 + nm days to keep themselves in contention by Cape Horn.

I was surprised they legged out on Gitana 17 during those first few days …

And as I mentioned I was completely wrong in 2016 about IDEC’s chances due to the deficit they faced as they entered the Indian Ocean ...

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It may be that this is the first real stab at what a foiler like this can show and do, and they may be reining her in a bit still.  It is important to get around without mishap, hence, just some consistency.  IDEC was such an incredible run!!!!   Especially in their climb back up the Atlantic, along with the S Ocean sprint speed they had.  All this is so awesome to watch and follow!

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We should remember that the first version of the MACIF trimaran went round en 42 days 16 hours, with François Gabart sailing solo. He was still in it to beat the overall record after the Horn until he had to go round the Azores high, which I think IDEC didn't do.

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Latest plot.

jules.png

There was obviously a bug on my ais-tracking code when the sign of the longitude changed. Bummer that, lost few hours of data - seems like 3h is missing, but luckily they didn't change course or speed much it seems.

 

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Last 24 hours are 884 nm or 36.9 knots. That's already almost idec's best 24 hours (894nm). It seems they have the pace to "hold off" idec's amazing southern ocean run. Now let's see how far this low brings them. Idec got to new zealand on one low if I remember correctly.

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Holy smokes, Sodebo has caught up to the second chasing pack in the VG (see arrow) !

Let's hope that they can jump to the low to the east before the high pressure in front of them turns their current low southward.

Calling Mr. Herman to a white courtesy telephone,

Mr. Herman to a white courtesy telephone, please.

 

jvt-06-12-20-1300.png

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To jump off the high pressure in front they need the performances of a modern AC boat. When I started following the first Orma Multi flleet  in the 90's  they were  making speed 1.5-1.8 of the current wind. Now these huge foilers are able of clocking speeds  2 or 2.5 times higher than the wind. AC boats are able of achieving speeds of 3 or 3.5. in some cases (low wind).  Theoretically   you can do a sub 30 days JV with those performances. I guess I have to wait 20 years to see that.  I will be more than happy if I see a <40 days tour this time. But difficult, very difficult. 

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Hmm, digging through sat ais logs,

MT latlon: -47.257950 7.771237

VF latlon: -47.25206 7.74414

This is consistent difference of around 2150 meters. Timestamps match, positions are current, so one of these is off, but which one? 

Hmm, would need a third reference point, does the tracker expose raw lat lon somewhere?

Or maybe they indeed come from two different sat ais feeds and they are indeed two different reports, which I would not have suspected... Will have to continue comparing. Interesting.

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I’m literally on the edge of my seat checking this page, and the tracker almost hourly. It’s amazing how a boat going 40 knots can feel like your watching paint dry as they inch their way across the tiny globe on my phone...

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What a fantastic beast, but sadly now down to 17 knots in 18 knots of wind, some kind of problem? End of 24 hour record chance.

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5 minutes ago, noaano said:

Where do you see this? Solid 35kts ish lately. 34.9kts right now.

You see it on the left column on the tracker, boat speed and wind speed, or by clicking on the boat.

Severall times the tracker has shown speeds like that, wonder if it is sail cahnges or measurements glitches, I doubt a sail change would slow hem down as much, must be done with always a sail in front .

Btw, thanks a lot for the Sat AIS tracking, but last pics not readable at all, maybe put the file in addition to the pic ?

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59 minutes ago, yl75 said:

You see it on the left column on the tracker, boat speed and wind speed, or by clicking on the boat.

Severall times the tracker has shown speeds like that, wonder if it is sail cahnges or measurements glitches, I doubt a sail change would slow hem down as much, must be done with always a sail in front .

 

This is not evident in AIS data at all. Strange.

The speed never dropped below 32.7kts.

 

Quote

Btw, thanks a lot for the Sat AIS tracking, but last pics not readable at all, maybe put the file in addition to the pic ?

 

Good to know, my own image is clear, there must be some resampling there.

Uploading the image does not work either... Produces an error.

Is this any better:

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On 12/5/2020 at 7:49 AM, TheDragon said:

It would be amazing to see it pushed over 900

And if/when they beat the outright record of 908.2nm. They have to beat it by a full mile, so 909.2 is the number to watch.

(WSSR Ratified time set in 2009 by "Banque Populaire 5, the 131 ft Tri skipped by Pascal Bidegorry FRA, av. 37.84 kts)

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Sadly, they are going too fast to pick up Nélias' ice routing teammate, Sam Davies.

Had hoped to hear the agreements and arrangements with Sodebo, the IC project, and the FR Navy had allowed her to transfer her Initiates Coeur campaign to Sodebo, so we could click through the Sodebo site to save lives while her IMOCA was fixed in time.

Would have been glorious to see her transferred back to IC when Sodebo got near to Les Sables, and watched her sail into Les Sables and later greet the winner on the docks.

That would have gotten lots of clicks.

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13 minutes ago, noaano said:

Now they _did_ slow down:

38.8 -> 13.0 -> 12.5 kts.

Problems?

I think it must be a glitch in the tracker. 
36.8 again!

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4 minutes ago, Solarbri said:

I think it must be a glitch in the tracker. 
36.8 again!

This is btw not tracker, its "real" ais data, updated every few mins.

38.8 -> 13.0 -> 12.5 -> 11.2 -> 11.9 kts.

They have not recovered after slowdown. Sail change? 30+ mins now.

And it has been solid 35 - 40 kts before for a long time before hitting the brakes.

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1 hour ago, noaano said:

 

This is not evident in AIS data at all. Strange.

The speed never dropped below 32.7kts.

 

 

Good to know, my own image is clear, there must be some resampling there.

Uploading the image does not work either... Produces an error.

Is this any better:

14917266.jpg

 By zooming in, I can read the numbers. Otherwise it's unintelligible.

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58 minutes ago, noaano said:

This is btw not tracker, its "real" ais data, updated every few mins.

38.8 -> 13.0 -> 12.5 -> 11.2 -> 11.9 kts.

They have not recovered after slowdown. Sail change? 30+ mins now.

And it has been solid 35 - 40 kts before for a long time before hitting the brakes.

Shit, indeed most probably an issue ..

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14 minutes ago, yl75 said:

Shit, indeed most probably an issue ..

It dropped all the way to 4.0kts, but now it picked up again:

4.0 -> 25.7 -> 17.1 -> 33.3 -> 33.1 kts.

Maybe they sorted it out. Lost 1h 45 mins, so no 24h record this time I think.

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6 minutes ago, noaano said:

It dropped all the way to 4.0kts, but now it picked up again:

4.0 -> 25.7 -> 17.1 -> 33.3 -> 33.1 kts.

Maybe they sorted it out. Lost 1h 45 mins, so no 24h record this time I think.

Yep... They were slow for about 15 miles, with various jibes/maneuvers in the mix. Back to normal speed now, hopefully, the boat is still at 100%...

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5 minutes ago, noaano said:

It dropped all the way to 4.0kts, but now it picked up again:

4.0 -> 25.7 -> 17.1 -> 33.3 -> 33.1 kts.

Maybe they sorted it out. Lost 1h 45 mins, so no 24h record this time I think.

Would say they probably hit something or at least got entangled in something, took sometime to check/remove and restarted.

But them still being 4 or 5 knots slower is worriying.

Or maybe some deck gear or rigging issue.

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How is Sodebo generating electricity?  Just a generator?  I didn't see any watt & sea's on the back in the videos.  Must be tough to keep one of those in the water / running at 30+ knots, but also how would you get cooling water for a genny?

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Wow.  That was amazing watching Sodebo drop into that low and take off.  I think the highest 24 hour average I saw 880 + nm and they were close to 700 nm ahead of IDEC at one point … They were going right down the rhumb line for the majority of the day.  They remain about 175 miles further south than IDEC’s track where you get big gains by being a few more degrees south.

They clearly have the speed to put up the numbers required.  Now the question becomes if the boat is reliable, the weather cooperates and ice is not an issue (Peyron had to jog north in 2011 due to ice).  I don’t think there is any question the crew is up to the task.

Sodebo crossed the Cape of Good Hope meridian at about 12 days, 2 hours.  That is about 4 hours and 15 minutes slower than Peyron in 2011 (and about 5 hours, 50 minutes slower than Garbart in 2017).

IDEC is currently 17 ½ hours behind.  We know that they are about to reel off ten 800 mile days in a row and turn a 21 hour 45 minute deficit into a 17 hour advantage by Cape Leeuwin.

Sodebo is currently in the midst of an 830 mile 24 hour period.  The crazy thing is IDEC is in the midst of an 850 24 hour run.  So they are slowly reeling in Sodebo.  Can’t imagine doing 830 nm AND lose ground to the competition.  Other worldly numbers …

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2 hours ago, noaano said:

An aircooled radiator, like in cars, maybe?

Could be a hybrid system, a watercooled heat exchanger for slower going, maybe?

I would guess they do not have a lot of requirement for power. Sat comms are probably the biggest drain, then electronics...anything else?

So an air cooled gen would do the job fine, maybe a fuel cell? I know IDEC took a fuel cell on the solo RTW.

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8 hours ago, Airwick said:

Not sure if there is something wrong or just sea-state related but they seem a bit off pace going "only" 34 in 21kt of wind...
Hope it's nothing too serious...

By the way quite funny to say : "this sailboat is only doing 34 knts in 21 of wind, must for sure have an issue !" :)

But I hope they will tell what it was, nothing in this morning messages

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On 12/4/2020 at 2:51 PM, stief said:

Also wonder if this might be the JVT where the dream of a boat that can jump to a low *ahead* is finally within reach. IIRC, that has been the major barrier to any big breakthroughs in the race record. 

What's interesting today is the fast moving low, that Coville & company are riding in front of, is catching up to the low ahead. The high pressure ridge dividing the two lows is disappearing. I don't think we can say 'jump to' yet, in the sense that Sodebo crosses a HP ridge to get to the low ahead, but they might get unceremoniously dumped onto the next low anyway. Once there, they have the speed to move to the front.

Who knows what happens when a low overtakes another low ? 

Sodebo has passed the second chase group in the VG (see arrow).

JVT-7-12-1200.png

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3 hours ago, Potter said:

maybe a fuel cell? I know IDEC took a fuel cell on the solo RTW.

Fuel cells if methanol need a lot of fuel. its like 1L = 1kWh, whereas with diesel you get 3-5 kWh per liter. But maybe simpler, overall, combined with pv-panels should be plenty.

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They don't mention anything wrong so that's good!
They do say the seas are rough so that explains the slightly "lower" speeds (relative to what the boat can do in this kind of wind) and they expect to be slower than Idec to Leuwin...

Water at 0C and watching for ice, scary stuff!

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In a recent video the helm is steering with one hand and adjusting a line with the other. The line is tensioned with a bungee to hold the slack. Anyone know what this line does? Is it foil related, or trimming control?

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2 hours ago, Airwick said:

 .... they expect to be slower than Idec to Leuwin (sic)...

 

Interesting.  Where did you get that information?  It is true that the Cape of Good Hope to Cape Leeuwin IDEC time is close to unassailable.  You’d need flat water, perfect weather and a foiler to get ahead of the 4 ½ day reference time.  That’s about a 35 knot average and about an average of 840 nm a day.

I assume the brain trust on Sodebo feels the Leeuwin to Cape Horn reference time is “softer.”  Maybe they are banking on foiling from Cape Horn to the Equator, a reference record that IDEC doesn’t own.

IDEC pouring it on, taken about 50 miles back.  Lead now 644 nm.

Belo