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Jules Verne Trophy 2020


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A few more details on the conditions needed for Gitana, but weather briefing will be tomorrow

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It's not extraordinary but..."

With the weather cell, Franck Cammas and Charles Caudrelier, and their router Marcel van Triest, scanned the forecast files morning and evening to find a weather window. A possibility is looming and could lead to a line crossing off Ouessant between December 29 and 31. "This is not an extraordinary niche as we hoped at the beginning of the stand-by, but it is a niche to take seriously because it offers correct passage times on the first third of the journey," explains the router. Marcel van Triest continues: "Currently the weather is very turbulent off Brittany with storm Bella that swept the Atlantic coasts and those of La Mancha. The wind will turn north - northwest and then it should weaken from tomorrow evening (Monday evening). The state of the sea should also become more practicable again. These muscular and overly engaged conditions block any departure for the moment. But we won't have to drag too much on because in the coming days if the models just see a depression forming in the southwest of the Canary Islands, in the middle of the Atlantic, and its displacement to the African coasts could completely break the trade wind regime..."

It will therefore be necessary to be opportunistic if the openness is confirmed and jump into the waxes.

Monday morning, the six sailors of the "Maxi Edmond de Rothschild" (*) will meet at the Lorient base: weather briefing with Marcel van Triest, PCR tests, loading of refuelling and preparation of personal belongings will follow one another.

Safari trans from Le Telegramme

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20201228_083655.thumb.jpg.3b24273a77a6fd2ab17cfaab63771014.jpg

Mommy to son... "Now you listen here. You are doing this thing and you better bring home that damn trophy!"

It least that is what I think the caption read. My french isn't too good (nor my English).

Talk about pressure.

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21 hours ago, stief said:

Nice clear view of the Cape of Good Hope. Not often we see it on starboard. Expect Sodebo will have a better vid up later.

https://twitter.com/Sodebo_Voile/status/1343271337545129985?s=20

 

Cape Point, a bit to the SE, is much more impressive than Cape of Good Hope. We went past much, much closer, motoring as there was zero wind - going the other way.

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6 hours ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

Cape Point, a bit to the SE, is much more impressive than Cape of Good Hope. We went past much, much closer, motoring as there was zero wind - going the other way.

The other way? Like Sodebo E->W, or the other way? Either way, sounds intriguing.

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14 hours ago, stief said:

The other way? Like Sodebo E->W, or the other way? Either way, sounds intriguing.

Sorry if I wasn't clear from E to W as is the norm for people doing a 'regular' circumnavigation. We were in SImonstown which is just around the corner from Cape Town (it actually is an outer suburb of CT) and waited for a good forecast to go around to the city. Turned out to be too good as we had no wind at all. We stayed quite close to land and the scenery is spectacular.

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Coville and crew with New Year's greetings near the equator. Coville with inspiring quotes too (don't recognize the songwriter/poet). Worth the 5 click hassle ;) 

 

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Gitana Code yellow.  

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Yellow code, the window seems to be coming true

The weather scenario is becoming clearer for the men of Maxim Edmond de Rothschild, more than ever waiting for a green code to cast off the mooring lines and reach the start line of the Jules Verne Trophy off the Breton tip. The update of this Tuesday evening's forecast files is eagerly awaited. Indeed, the weather cell of the five-arrow stable will refine the right time after the analysis of the latter to leave Lorient and point the bows of the giant by 32 meters towards Ouessant. Two major trends are in the balance: a departure tomorrow, Wednesday, January 6, in the early morning or 48 hours later to finish this first week of 2021 in style.

 

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From Sodebo . . .  includes some  footage with Gitana in the background

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For this winter's challenge, our skipper, familiar with solo experiences, took on the role of team leader by taking on board 7 sailors with varied experiences. Discover Thomas Coville through the eyes of the team members of the Jules Verne Trophy 2020 attempt!

 

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On 1/3/2021 at 9:40 AM, stief said:

Coville and crew with New Year's greetings near the equator. Coville with inspiring quotes too (don't recognize the songwriter/poet). Worth the 5 click hassle ;) 

 

This is a text from Jacques Brel; he was a singer/song writer from Belgium and sang in French. He was one of the masters of French (speaking) song writers in the 60s and 70s.

He is our Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen and Tom Waits combined.

 

 

 

 

But better...

 

:D

 

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Was about to post the same. Like the effort to share their plans. Much better than waiting for the US Senate results ;) 

Hmm. Almost the same ice zone as the VG. 444822067_ScreenShot2021-01-06at11_35_40AM.thumb.png.7cd69c739f750938da087ecc150143c1.png

 

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8 minutes ago, stief said:

Much better than waiting for the US Senate results ;) 

B)  Those aren't keeping me on the edge of my seat like this anticipated start again for the Gitana Team.

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20 hours ago, Laurent said:

This is a text from Jacques Brel; he was a singer/song writer from Belgium and sang in French. He was one of the masters of French (speaking) song writers in the 60s and 70s.

He is our Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen and Tom Waits combined.

But better...

:D

The best french chansonnier imho, who was indeed Belgian. And he actually not only sang about sailors (Port d'Amsterdam), he was a proper cruising sailor himself. He made it to the Marquesas in French Polynesia, where he later died of lung cancer and was buried in the local cemetery, next to Paul Gauguin.

Here, in his last song, he sings about death, Gauguin and the lovely islands, in his usual poetic way. And what a nice video too!

 

Lyrics in French and English:

https://www.kcrw.com/music/articles/jacques-brels-haunting-song-les-marquises

And btw, two Belgium sailmaker brothers organised the immense restoration of the rather nice 20 metre steel "Askoy II".

https://www.oostendevooranker.be/en/the-yacht-once-owned-and-sailed-by-singer-jacques-brel/

 

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No code green today (thursday), so time for a bit more Jaques Brel thread drift.

This Cathedral song and supurb video is in fact all about his boat and the voyage.

 

And here the lyrics in English, not really as poetic as in French, but it explains it's connection with the sea.

 

 

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Sometime between yesterday evening and Saturday morning they're going.

Per AIS, she's still on the dock at La Base.

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"strong yellow" on the way to code Green

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Patience and concentration

For several days, the succession of grib files which Franck Cammas and Charles Caudrelier have been studying with the router and 7th man, Marcel van Triest, have been in agreement that it will soon be time for the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild to cast off and set sail. This Thursday, all the lights are taking on a strong yellow hue as they prepare to switch to green. All the members of the five-arrow racing stable have been on the alert for the past few days so as not to let slide this fine opportunity taking shape ahead of the offshore charger’s bows. This Saturday 9 January 2021, the six sailors on this trimaran designed for oceanic flight could well make for the start zone off the island of Ushant with a view to setting sail on this outright round the world record attempt.

http://www.gitana-team.com/en/news_actu.aspx?id=1267

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Let's go! Something else to watch, good luck to them, don't hit anything.

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12 minutes ago, Bebmoumoute said:

Good question:

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What tools do you have to avoid collisions with Ofni and cetaceans?

We have a vision system, at the head of the mast, but it didn't work very well for everything between two waters, we have the radar, we also have a system that makes noise to frighten marine animals, and our eyes especially. But it is certain that there is a part of the unknown, we can clearly see it in the Vendée Globe. This will also be part of the Jules Verne Trophy. We are not yet close to finding the perfect system in this area.

(I assume the "two waters" = submerged) 

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3 hours ago, Bebmoumoute said:

Just a casual top speed of 45.2 knots on the way to the start line...

Best time to find out if something falls apart at speed. :lol:

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Boom they are off!!!!!

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3 minutes ago, Bebmoumoute said:

No exclusion zone or ice limit for the Jules Verne

I thought it was the Finisterre TSS, but ok I guess. 

Hang on though, if it’s irrelevant to their trophy challenge course, why have it marked on their custom tracking map? Still a bit puzzled...

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2 hours ago, Bebmoumoute said:

No exclusion zone or ice limit for the Jules Verne

Goulp! How does one awoid turning it into some kind of Russian roulette? Weren’t ice gates and zones introduced in the Volvo and Vendee because the sailors took higher and higher risks? 

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1 minute ago, 10thTonner said:

Goulp! How does one awoid turning it into some kind of Russian roulette? Weren’t ice gates and zones introduced in the Volvo and Vendee because the sailors took higher and higher risks? 

This is not a race.

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Just wondering about maritime law and TSS zones...  I realize Jules Verne doesn't have a Race Committee, NOR, etc...  So they can sail anywhere they feel is safe to sail, but...  Is it legal to sail through there?

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4 hours ago, jimmyuk81 said:

Are they allowed to go here? :huh:

Yes--covered under international laws (not what we usually think of as normal racing rules)

Easiest explanation is here

The JVT rules are pretty simple, and some fine pics and history of how this became seen a French thing.

Love this trophy sculpted by the American artist Thomas Shannon

TJV_HISTOIRE_sculpture2.jpg

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A rendezvous with sailors

To draw up the simplest possible regulations, Titouan and Florence met up with experienced navigators, lovers of freedom who were driven by dreams resembling their own. They frequently gathered at the houseboat of Dany and Yvon Fauconnier. Moored on one edge of the Seine, on the banks of the Île de la Jatte, this was a meeting spot for sailors in Paris. Also with them were the ever-loyal Jean-François Coste , Yves Le Cornec, Eugène Riguidel, Jean-Yves Terlain, but also, for this purpose, Philippe Monet and the Peyron brothers.

It was namely here that the itinerary of their world tour was sketched out: with no assistance and no stopovers, the crews would sail from east to west, on the open sea, passing three capes to the portside: Good Hope, Leeuwin and Horn. At the departure and at the finish, they would go over an imaginary line at the entrance of the English Channel, between the UK's Lizard Point and France's Ushant Island (2)(2) TJV_GENESE_5-689x1024.jpgThe Créac'h lighthouse of Ouessant, one of the two ends of the Jules Verne Trophy departure line. © Photo Christian February.

The Jules Verne Trophy was placed under the High Patronage of the French Ministry of Culture. It was created following a call for tenders financed by the ministry, won by US artist Tom Shannon. The original sculpture remains the property of the French State and is conserved in the Paris Marine Museum. The Trophy would be presented to the skipper who beat the circumnavigation speed record in under 80 days. And its holder would in turn hand it over to whoever bettered his or her record.

Verne, Blake and Knox-Johnston (3)(3) TJV_HISTOIRE_RobinBlake-681x1024.jpgSir Peter Blake and Sir Robin Knox-Johnston on the doorstep of the Yacht Club de France. The Sir Peter Blake Trust Collection / Alan Sefton.

Florence and Titouan headed to Portsmouth to present the “Jules Verne” to Peter Blake. The winner of the Whitbread dreamed of a new challenge to fill out one of the most prestigious prize lists in the world of sailing. “For those tempted by adventure, it's becoming more and more difficult to be first. There aren't many more mountains left to climb; very few challenges remain that deserve being called records, and that can bring us personal satisfaction, ”regretted the New Zealander skipper. The Jules Verne Trophy could however - he was convinced - “drive his adrenalin levels back up.” 
“What makes this challenge so attractive is that it is possibly possible,”added his sailing companion Robin Knox-Johnston. The holder of the first non-stop, single-handed circumnavigation record (Golden Globe Challenge, 1968) was also a believer. “Mix technology in with the harsh reality of the Forties and the challenge becomes irresistible,” he continued with enthusiasm. “If we succeed, it will be the triumph of ingenuity and the human spirit.” 
For Florence and Titouan, the support of these ocean-racing giants gave their challenge international legitimacy as of its launch.

 

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3 hours ago, 10thTonner said:

Goulp! How does one awoid turning it into some kind of Russian roulette? Weren’t ice gates and zones introduced in the Volvo and Vendee because the sailors took higher and higher risks? 

JV is russian roulette, to a degree. 9/10 attempts, maybe  more, fail to make it all the way due to breakages, bad weather, etc. But the point is that its a no-holds-barred record. At the same time, it usually isn't faster to go low enough to where you start dodging icebergs in the antarctic.

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14 minutes ago, crashtack said:

JV is russian roulette, to a degree. 9/10 attempts, maybe  more, fail to make it all the way due to breakages, bad weather, etc. But the point is that its a no-holds-barred record. At the same time, it usually isn't faster to go low enough to where you start dodging icebergs in the antarctic.

I love it when people start quoting some undocumented numbers... bloody hell it is not complcated to find the real numbers...

Anyway see table below (doesn't include the current attempt from Gitana and only includes fully crewed attempts). The reality is far from what you are picturing:

  • 58% abandoned
  • 15% finished without a new record
  • 27% broke the record

Source: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trophée_Jules-Verne

 

Sans titre.png

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3 hours ago, Bebmoumoute said:

I love it when people start quoting some undocumented numbers... bloody hell it is not complcated to find the real numbers...

Anyway see table below (doesn't include the current attempt from Gitana and only includes fully crewed attempts). The reality is far from what you are picturing:

  • 58% abandoned
  • 15% finished without a new record
  • 27% broke the record

Source: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trophée_Jules-Verne

 

Sans titre.png

I doubt that includes *all* attempts, but the exact numbers aren't really relevant to the point I was trying to make.

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Pretty sure that is all the attempts at the Jules Verne..There are rules and fees for Jules Verne.

I think Steve Fossett did at least one attempt on beating the Jules Verne time but refused to pay the relevant fees so that even if he had beaten the time (or maybe he actually did, I can't remember) he could not have held the Jules Verne Trophy. No fees = no trophy.

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11 minutes ago, DtM said:

Pretty sure that is all the attempts at the Jules Verne..There are rules and fees for Jules Verne.

I think Steve Fossett did at least one attempt on beating the Jules Verne time but refused to pay the relevant fees so that even if he had beaten the time (or maybe he actually did, I can't remember) he could not have held the Jules Verne Trophy. No fees = no trophy.

Yes.

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10 minutes ago, DtM said:

Pretty sure that is all the attempts at the Jules Verne..There are rules and fees for Jules Verne.

I think Steve Fossett did at least one attempt on beating the Jules Verne time but refused to pay the relevant fees so that even if he had beaten the time (or maybe he actually did, I can't remember) he could not have held the Jules Verne Trophy. No fees = no trophy.

Right---13 days. 

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Just did some checking Fossett on Cheyenne broke the Jules Verne time in 2004 by nearly 6 days. but paid no fees so did not get the Jules Verne even though he held the fastest time.

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Fossett was a great adventurer. Play Station and or Cheyenne was one of the fastest racing cats at that time... M&M designed.

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1 hour ago, DtM said:

Just did some checking Fossett on Cheyenne broke the Jules Verne time in 2004 by nearly 6 days. but paid no fees so did not get the Jules Verne even though he held the fastest time.

Fossett was a typical arrogant, rich American arsehole.  He refused to pay the fees to the JV association, tried to beat them down to something like 10-20% of the asking.  He sailed anyway, boasting that he would bust the association's control of the record.  That didn't work - every attempt since has been through the JV gatekeepers, and Fossett's name doesn't appear in the lists, so he is the forgotten one and the JV association goes from strength to strength.  When on the return up the Atlantic it looked very likely they would beat the record time, Fossett tried to pay the fees (again, reduced IIRC) so he would be recognised as the holder of the JVT, but Lamazou (IIRC) told him to pound sand.  

My memory is fading, but wasn't the boat still called "Playstation" at the time?

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