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The only thing wrong with it is about 30' of LOA and 10,000 lbs of displacement too much boat. Maybe a sail training school could snap a boat like this up but what other serious use is there? $150k is doable for your average cruising retiree couple but the upkeep and dockage, to say nothing of handling the lines, is surely beyond this market's ability. And if some rich nostalgic person picked it up, it still is too old and narrow to make into a cruiser and too outdated to play with the modern racers.

 

That said maybe there is something really screwed with it beyond it being 70 wallet-fucking feet of boat. A lightly built boat that's been raced hard for decades has got to have some deeper problems.

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1 hour ago, Commercial Boater said:

$150k is doable for your average cruising retiree couple but the upkeep and dockage, to say nothing of handling the lines, is surely beyond this market's ability.

I was hot for this boat about 3 years ago. My intent was "cruising retiree couple" and that intent is impossible. It really is much too big and powerful for that use.

It has been upgraded since then, so even faster now. But is now even less appropriate for a retirement cruiser for a couple of (obviously old) retirees.

Of course, if I was into the group sex scene instead of monogamy, and was single instead of very happily married, it might well work fine!! Plenty of berths, that is for sure, and about the right amount of privacy for orgies: none!

 

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You could cruise it with two competent couples. Privacy? Heck there's always port and starboard. But, it will be picked up by someone wanting to get into the West Coast offshore scene. With a windy enough race or a parking lot just before the finish her rating could pay.

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1 hour ago, Commercial Boater said:

A lightly built boat that's been raced hard for decades has got to have some deeper problems.

We our notte hearre to discusse thisse boates mental state ...... butte we coude talkle rental rate.

Ime am thicking SA AmeriCup campaine funde coude by the boate foirre SAYC Mebbers charteres.  TransPacs, rellaxing rides to HI, runs to Mexicoe, druken excapades on Catalina, a voiyage to HK to finde Ian an tacke hime foire a midnite strolle in teh car parke.  The possibilities our endlesse.........              :)

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Yeah, it could be the ed's next Anarchy. He could branch off into the pay to play charter program. 

 

Or, J World could do what they already are set up to do.

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Oh you mean all those guys who got rich and bought 70' sleds in the last 3 years and now see the faully of their way?

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2 hours ago, Commercial Boater said:

The only thing wrong with it is about 30' of LOA and 10,000 lbs of displacement too much boat. Maybe a sail training school could snap a boat like this up but what other serious use is there? $150k is doable for your average cruising retiree couple but the upkeep and dockage, to say nothing of handling the lines, is surely beyond this market's ability. And if some rich nostalgic person picked it up, it still is too old and narrow to make into a cruiser and too outdated to play with the modern racers.

 

That said maybe there is something really screwed with it beyond it being 70 wallet-fucking feet of boat. A lightly built boat that's been raced hard for decades has got to have some deeper problems.

My only guess, and I’m not implying this is true, would be some de-lam going on forward of the mast. It’s happened to 2 of the 3 SC70’s I’ve sailed on. Not catastrophic by any means, but not cheap. Then there’s always the unholy sail budget!!  I still love those boats!

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7 minutes ago, Teener said:

I believe it was Robert Perry that once said that running costs for a 50 footer was about 2x running costs for a sailboat of 45 feet.  So how would be the running costs for a 70 footer compare?

I've got a 50'er that I cruise on. If you raced it and blew out sails on the regular, maybe. However, for my use pattern I'd say that last 5 feet adds 10% in length and 20% in costs.

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4 hours ago, El Boracho said:

SC 70 is only 68 LOA. I’ve been thinking of moving up. Who said the boat length in feet should equal the owner’s age in years? 

Feet should equal years plus 10, just for, you know, real comfort.

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11 hours ago, Commercial Boater said:

The only thing wrong with it is about 30' of LOA and 10,000 lbs of displacement too much boat.

It's in a conundrum, the boat for its age looks to be in beautiful shape and recently been maintained really well. Having said that, what are you going to do with it? Race it, then do the numbers, the price of sails are shockingly high, there's a lot of sq.ft. hoisted above your head that will be need paying for (insert: a smiling sailmaker) and that will easily be in the mid-high five figures just to start off, throw in the thought of a Transpac and that easily doubles into six f. If that's not a problem, potential problem #2; Have you tried getting crew recently for a race? How many penises do you think it needs?  It's brutal and the boat needs lots of them and they need to show up regularly, every time you want to race you'll need a pickup the phone all week, which a boat this size is a full time job for just being on the phone and it's like herding cats to get everyone on board and on time, so the new owner can try to do that themselves (not) or pay a salary to make that happen. While doing the above and not spending a ton on mods besides sails, how competitive of a boat is it? It is surprising how heavy the boat is (23,000 lbs). Does the bang for buck compare to a newer lighter racer that are currently on the used market? Most likely not.

Ok, then how about fun sailing or cruising? Well there's not much of an interior although I like it and there's room for a couple of easy and cheap mods to help improve that but it will still be an aging racing boat interior. Then equate all the muscle needed just to go sailing and what happens when the breeze comes on? Boat is currently set up to be sailed with lots of muscle. The boats rigging will need to be modified to make it cruisy/able to sail it short handed; doing that will cost some big bucks and riggers will love to get that job to help pay his alimony and his ex's mortgage. But then why do all the rigging changes for short handed and then not do anything to the interior? If you do both then your talking a good six figures; don't forget the new sails that will also be needed for that new set up. 

It kind of sad that a boat like this can't get enough love but times have changed. When your doing the math and adding up all the numbers, the bang for the buck is not all that good compare to some newer, lighter, faster more efficient boats for not a whole lot more. Of course it could always be a candidate for the Family of Eight who want to a Transpac but probably not. Wouldn't be surprised if the price goes down even more although I think the new owner will be a total newbie with rose colored glasses on, thinking how great it will be.

I do wish it a happy future and many days of good sailing, reaching through life.

 

 

 

 

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It's a really nice Santa Cruz 70. Hull #15 which was in the later boats like Holua and OE which had foam decks and a much more usable cockpit layout. Only knock on the boat is it is still in original configuration. Aluminum rig, full width chain plates and the short elliptical keel. Decent set up for Great Lakes racing but not for the West Coast. It comes with another keel and rig but adapting those both to the boat would take some resources. That Runaway keel would probably need 2 tons of lead milled off and I would guess that the lower fin flange would end up too big for the ideal bulb shape. All stuff that can be done, but just takes some bucks. Hence the low starting price.

Anybody that wants a 70 to race in the Great Lakes should jump on that thing. It sailed pretty fast when it was back here. It's basically the same configuration that Nitemare was when it used to win some hardware.

And gotta think it needs a complete inventory. 

Nothing a box full of cash can't fix.

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12 hours ago, El Boracho said:

Who said the boat length in feet should equal the owner’s age in years? 

I was told after arriving in Bermuda to never cross an ocean in a boat shorter than your age...

 

Other than running cost, the handles on the pedestal are missing!

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there is nothing like the awesome power and beauty of a large racing yacht. if you can afford it, I recommend it. Just buy sails that last a bit longer , learn how to maintain some of the systems yourself, slip space that costs less is available in some areas. you will never have problems finding crew. people love sailing on big fast boats. personally though I am not so much into sleds. I like all around capable boats more, Volvo 60s, mini maxis and so forth..

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1 hour ago, lead_ior50 said:

 if you can afford it, I recommend it. Just buy sails that last a bit longer , learn how to maintain some of the systems yourself, slip space that costs less is available in some areas. you will never have problems finding crew. 

FIFY

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11 hours ago, Black Sox said:

Feet should equal years plus 10, just for, you know, real comfort.

Little kids should be starting out in Seascape 18s rather than Optis?

 

5 hours ago, eastern motors said:

What's the moorage for a 70ft well in Long Beach?

Just park it stern-to in a 20' side-tie.

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6 hours ago, eastern motors said:

What's the moorage for a 70ft well in Long Beach? 

 

Boat is just completely impractical for anything other than it's designed use, racing to Hawaii.  Perfect tool for the job but not much else.

One nut and a leg.

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6 hours ago, eastern motors said:

Boat is just completely impractical for anything other than it's designed use, racing to Hawaii.  Perfect tool for the job but not much else.

I think she would make a great cruiser. But that is just me. I'd rather cruise in 12 tons of SC 70 than 12 (20?) tons of any popular heavy cruiser. There is one SC70 out there, or was, cruising short/single handed. Lotsa sail area to handle and pay for, yes, but comparable to common 45-50ish catamarans which cruiser think are reasonable to cruise.

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26 minutes ago, El Boracho said:

I think she would make a great cruiser. But that is just me. I'd rather cruise in 12 tons of SC 70 than 12 (20?) tons of any popular heavy cruiser. There is one SC70 out there, or was, cruising short/single handed. Lotsa sail area to handle and pay for, yes, but comparable to common 45-50ish catamarans which cruiser think are reasonable to cruise.

Sure but then it will need a cruising interior and mods to the rigging to make it worth while. Add up all those numbers and then go compare it to other used racy cruisers that are ready to sail? Then you need to add the cost of the down time of not being able to use the boat while the mods are happening (it will be a while) and then also add your time (expense) needed (time is money) overseeing the project?  I think it's $15+ per foot in Long Beach. $15 x 70' = $1050/month. Which in the grand scheme of things, is not that bad at all, after considering all the other money being spent on it, it's a drop in the buck. The boat captain will be 3-4x's that per month..

It would be a fun cruising boat, especially in So. Cal if set up for it properly but it will never be comfortable going into weather beating. I remember in '85 bring a SC70 back from Hawaii while laying in the back berth looking at the bow. You can literally watch the hull ripple/reverberate back to you when crashing down over a swell, a second later, it would then hit your bunk and bounce you around. They were never designed to go into weather. 

 

 

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12 minutes ago, spectator said:

They were never designed to go into weather. 

2nd, 3rd and 5th Fleet Overall in this year's Bayview Mac that was upwind the entire way.  1st and 4th were TP52s.  Boat got a bad rep for upwind capability.  

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1 hour ago, spectator said:

Sure but then it will need a cruising interior and mods to the rigging to make it worth while...

I cruise a 100% original SC50. No mods other than a modern rudder. Original interior. Original rig configuration. Fantastic comfortable cruiser. Sailed singlehanded, too much of it to weather, from Singapore to California. Did just fine. I think your flex story from '85 is nothing more than mythology. Hear it often from dockwalkers. Never noticed it at sea. None of the tabbing is broken, anywhere, after 40 years, which certainly would be if things were visibly moving.

The only drawback to the OP boat would be that dark blue hull...hot in the tropics.

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2 hours ago, Alaris said:

Well I was all set to pull the trigger until I realized it was about 30’ taller than my local bridge. What kind of split rig goes best with a sled? Three masted schooner?

You do realize that the clearance thing is only an issue the first time through the bridge?

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11 hours ago, eastern motors said:

What's the moorage for a 70ft well in Long Beach? 

 

Boat is just completely impractical for anything other than it's designed use, racing to Hawaii.  Perfect tool for the job but not much else.

gotta be $1500ish ...

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5 hours ago, El Boracho said:

I cruise a 100% original SC50. No mods other than a modern rudder. Original interior. Original rig configuration. Fantastic comfortable cruiser. Sailed singlehanded, too much of it to weather, from Singapore to California. Did just fine. I think your flex story from '85 is nothing more than mythology. Hear it often from dockwalkers. Never noticed it at sea. None of the tabbing is broken, anywhere, after 40 years, which certainly would be if things were visibly moving.

The only drawback to the OP boat would be that dark blue hull...hot in the tropics.

I was going to with hold comments about the SC 50 vs the 70. But, then you posted this.  The 50 was and is a superior boat in pretty much every way.  Even more so when you consider it for a performance cruiser. I've sailed and surveyed both, even the one (70) that was not built by Bill Lee boats.

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7 hours ago, Cal20sailor said:

2nd, 3rd and 5th Fleet Overall in this year's Bayview Mac that was upwind the entire way.  1st and 4th were TP52s.  Boat got a bad rep for upwind capability.  

Not with only a few on the rail nor comfortable.  Have you actually been on a SC70 in big swell going the wrong way?

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3 minutes ago, spectator said:

Not with only a few on the rail nor comfortable.  Have you actually been on a SC70 in big swell going the wrong way?

Many, many times.  It's a lot more fun going the other way.  Great Lakes so I'd say waves vs swell and it wasn't comfortable, but reasonably fast and competitive.  

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6 hours ago, El Boracho said:

II think your flex story from '85 is nothing more than mythology. Hear it often from dockwalkers. 

Certainly not a myth and thanks for the jab of just being a dock walker but ok. To this day I remember it well and did several transpacific deliveries and countless ones from So. Cal to SF, going to weather off Pt. Sur is no joy but it is fairly dry with a high freeboard. The Nelson Marek 68's were even worse, I brought back Prima from Hawaii, now thats a noodle. There's a ton of other seasoned sailors, especially delivery crews that can speak about that so just don't take my word (which I'm totally ok on).

SC50's are great boats and I would certainly enjoy cruising one myself, I like the interior and feel of it when down below and yes the boat is manageable. The SC70 is a whole other beast, it's over 50% more boat to deal with and the ergonomics down below are totally different and deck layout and size of gear and distance away from each other is on a whole other level. Dont get me wrong, I love the SC70's, so fun dropping in, chute up and feels like a massive surfboard but its a conundrum when it comes from a shopping perspective for a used boat and how much is it really worth (bang for the buck). It has it quirks and associated costs that can sneak up on you pretty fast but I guess anything is great when the rosy glasses are on.

If you want to sail one of these, then the best deal in town, hands down is to charter one for a regatta and then go back to your other boat for regular use.

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8 hours ago, spectator said:

Sure but then it will need a cruising interior and mods to the rigging to make it worth while. Add up all those numbers and then go compare it to other used racy cruisers that are ready to sail? Then you need to add the cost of the down time of not being able to use the boat while the mods are happening (it will be a while) and then also add your time (expense) needed (time is money) overseeing the project?  I think it's $15+ per foot in Long Beach. $15 x 70' = $1050/month. Which in the grand scheme of things, is not that bad at all, after considering all the other money being spent on it, it's a drop in the buck. The boat captain will be 3-4x's that per month..

It would be a fun cruising boat, especially in So. Cal if set up for it properly but it will never be comfortable going into weather beating. I remember in '85 bring a SC70 back from Hawaii while laying in the back berth looking at the bow. You can literally watch the hull ripple/reverberate back to you when crashing down over a swell, a second later, it would then hit your bunk and bounce you around. They were never designed to go into weather. 

 

 

Consider a beercan race with 20 of you closest friends.  Now, with most cocktails being more than $10 each, your fist round of drinks is over $200.  I, for one, am rarely satisfied with one or three.  Now, the tab is up to around a grand.  Oh, dinner you say?  How many bottles of wine did I order?  How many weeks of this?  Yes, I have been involved when the nightly tab reached five figures. I just don’t remember much of it!  Luckily, it wasn’t my money!

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22 minutes ago, silent bob said:

Consider a beercan race with 20 of you closest friends.  Now, with most cocktails being more than $10 each, your fist round of drinks is over $200.  I, for one, am rarely satisfied with one or three.  Now, the tab is up to around a grand.  Oh, dinner you say?  How many bottles of wine did I order?  How many weeks of this?  Yes, I have been involved when the nightly tab reached five figures. I just don’t remember much of it!  Luckily, it wasn’t my money!

But at least when you buy those $200 rounds, getting the sails folded and put away is much easier. But without those 20, how much fun is folding the sails? Especially the main if you're folding it on the boom. Here's some pics I took many, many moons ago delivering a particular SC70 up the coast to SF for Big Boat Series, look at the height of the boom from the deck, you need a ladder. Now try doing it with just two other friends after sailing all day. An oh, notice the couple of those pulley thingys on the foredeck, there's a reason why they're there.

Also, a view from mast top looking down and nice shot of a SeaTek spreader and Golden Gate in the fog. Looking down at it, the boat still has good looking lines for such an old boat.

 

SC70, up to SF.jpeg

SC70, SF mast top.jpeg

SC70, SF mast top & Spreader.jpeg

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23 minutes ago, spectator said:

But at least when you buy those $200 rounds, getting the sails folded and put away is much easier. But without those 20, how much fun is folding the sails? Especially the main if you're folding it on the boom. Here's some pics I took many, many moons ago delivering a particular SC70 up the coast to SF for Big Boat Series, look at the height of the boom from the deck, you need a ladder. Now try doing it with just two other friends after sailing all day. An oh, notice the couple of those pulley thingys on the foredeck, there's a reason why they're there.

Also, a view from mast top looking down and nice shot of a SeaTek spreader and Golden Gate in the fog. Looking down at it, the boat still has good looking lines for such an old boat.

 

SC70, up to SF.jpeg

SC70, SF mast top.jpeg

SC70, SF mast top & Spreader.jpeg

Ah, the mighty Kathmandu!  Rafted up to the yellow bus?

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18 hours ago, El Boracho said:

I cruise a 100% original SC50. No mods other than a modern rudder. Original interior. Original rig configuration. Fantastic comfortable cruiser. Sailed singlehanded, too much of it to weather, from Singapore to California. Did just fine. I think your flex story from '85 is nothing more than mythology. Hear it often from dockwalkers. Never noticed it at sea. None of the tabbing is broken, anywhere, after 40 years, which certainly would be if things were visibly moving.

The only drawback to the OP boat would be that dark blue hull...hot in the tropics.

Although I’ll agree they go to weather quite nicely, I’ve seen the hull flex myself. I’ve also seen tabbing separate, albeit not from waves. Our main sheet winch tried to pick the deck up off the boat and ripped it right off the bulkhead. 

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12 hours ago, spectator said:

But at least when you buy those $200 rounds, getting the sails folded and put away is much easier. But without those 20, how much fun is folding the sails? Especially the main if you're folding it on the boom. Here's some pics I took many, many moons ago delivering a particular SC70 up the coast to SF for Big Boat Series, look at the height of the boom from the deck, you need a ladder. Now try doing it with just two other friends after sailing all day. An oh, notice the couple of those pulley thingys on the foredeck, there's a reason why they're there.

Also, a view from mast top looking down and nice shot of a SeaTek spreader and Golden Gate in the fog. Looking down at it, the boat still has good looking lines for such an old boat.

 

SC70, up to SF.jpeg

SC70, SF mast top.jpeg

SC70, SF mast top & Spreader.jpeg

Brrrrr. Time for the steam room and some French Onion Soup in the Mens' Grill 

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50 minutes ago, silent bob said:

AKA the Starshit?!  Er, Starship?

Yep. Primaries all the way aft and foot wells for the grinders. The original used a Z crank to drive the primaries, but the photo looks like it was changed to a permanent pedestal with the No Step drive shafts. 

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1 hour ago, silent bob said:

AKA the Starshit?!  Er, Starship?

Super lightly built and incredibly flexi hull.

 

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3 hours ago, silent bob said:

AKA the Starshit?!  Er, Starship?

Heh.  One of my favorite memories from the 90? 91? Cabo race was watching the Starship owner's very-enhanced girlfriend pop 'em out at Squid Roe.  (the race itself was pretty forgettable...)

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20 hours ago, Hitchhiker said:

I was going to with hold comments about the SC 50 vs the 70. But, then you posted this.  The 50 was and is a superior boat in pretty much every way.  Even more so when you consider it for a performance cruiser. I've sailed and surveyed both, even the one (70) that was not built by Bill Lee boats.

Delivery back from Cabo on a SC50 upwind in lump.  Pounding hard.  Boat twisting.  Every seam and portlight leaked.  Every bunk was saturated.  It was a rainstorm down below.  Ugly, ugly hate mission.  

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36 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

Delivery back from Cabo on a SC50 upwind in lump.  Pounding hard.  Boat twisting.  Every seam and portlight leaked.  Every bunk was saturated.  It was a rainstorm down below.  Ugly, ugly hate mission.  

Hmm.  Sounds like a pretty normal delivery from Cabo to me!

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If I could afford to own, properly maintain, and campaign that boat I would :

1. Buy an appropriate comfortable RV

2. buy a fleet of dinghies and a trailer that  could Hold everything including some other dinghies other than mine. 

3. invite friends to sail ...  in various regattas in places I would love to sail 

 

Then I would  spend a few months every year hitting fun regattas where my arrival would significantly boost the fleet size. 
My guess is I would cause others to see larger fleets and join the fun. 

 

note: it wouldn’t take very many folks doing this to cause sailing to boom.

now if only the USA had an enthusiastic  well funded builder of singlehanded sailing toys who would support a dealer network, fleets, and regattas.

 

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2 minutes ago, Gouvernail said:

If I could afford to own, properly maintain, and campaign that boat I would :

1. Buy an appropriate comfortable RV

2. buy a fleet of dinghies and a trailer that  could Hold everything including some other dinghies other than mine. 

3. invite friends to sail ...  in various regattas in places I would love to sail 

 

Then I would  spend a few months every year hitting fun regattas where my arrival would significantly boost the fleet size. 
My guess is I would cause others to see larger fleets and join the fun. 

 

note: it wouldn’t take very many folks doing this to cause sailing to boom.

now if only the USA had an enthusiastic  well funded builder of singlehanded sailing toys who would support a dealer network, fleets, and regattas.

 

You can’t drive a Winnebago to Honolulu.  Even if you could, it wouldn’t be as fun.

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On 9/15/2020 at 1:49 PM, Editor said:

 

A decent looking Santa Cruz 70 for $149,000 asking??  Check the listing here and then jump in the thread here.

whats wrong with it.jpg

On 9/15/2020 at 1:49 PM, Editor said:

 

A decent looking Santa Cruz 70 for $149,000 asking??  Check the listing here and then jump in the thread here.

whats wrong with it.jpg

 

Buy an ad

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21 hours ago, spectator said:

But at least when you buy those $200 rounds, getting the sails folded and put away is much easier. But without those 20, how much fun is folding the sails? Especially the main if you're folding it on the boom. Here's some pics I took many, many moons ago delivering a particular SC70 up the coast to SF for Big Boat Series, look at the height of the boom from the deck, you need a ladder. Now try doing it with just two other friends after sailing all day. An oh, notice the couple of those pulley thingys on the foredeck, there's a reason why they're there.

Also, a view from mast top looking down and nice shot of a SeaTek spreader and Golden Gate in the fog. Looking down at it, the boat still has good looking lines for such an old boat.

 

SC70, up to SF.jpeg

SC70, SF mast top.jpeg

SC70, SF mast top & Spreader.jpeg

top photo.... in the words of Latitude 38, "Point SUR is bad enough to piss off the Good Humor Man". ?Conception has always been somewhat OK to me. But I know there is always next tmem.

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2 hours ago, Hitchhiker said:

Hmm.  Sounds like a pretty normal delivery from Cabo to me!

True that! Cant think of a worse delivery/pounding except maybe going north, off the coast of Oregon heading to Seattle; same shit, potential for a lot more nasty and a lot colder. There's never enough food. Always better to have a surfboard and hug the coast with a lot of time available to eat lobster and surf.

But we've digressed from the OP

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11 hours ago, Gouvernail said:

If I could afford to own, properly maintain, and campaign that boat I would :

1. Buy an appropriate comfortable RV

2. buy a fleet of dinghies and a trailer that  could Hold everything including some other dinghies other than mine. 

3. invite friends to sail ...  in various regattas in places I would love to sail 

 

Then I would  spend a few months every year hitting fun regattas where my arrival would significantly boost the fleet size. 
My guess is I would cause others to see larger fleets and join the fun. 

 

note: it wouldn’t take very many folks doing this to cause sailing to boom.

now if only the USA had an enthusiastic  well funded builder of singlehanded sailing toys who would support a dealer network, fleets, and regattas.

 

You could call yourself Team LYRA - Redux

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That is a surprisingly low asking price. She looks in great condition. Maybe there is a survey problem....like wet core. Or maybe the owners of such a race yacht don't really care about the sale price bcuz as said above the cost of running a race program is so much greater.

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As the last charterer of Mirage from spring ‘17 to summer ‘18 I can verify that Mirage is a GREAT boat.  Prior to the charter the rig and hull were surveyed (out of the water), some minor repairs were recommended and made and we went sailing and had a blast.  The engine was checked, repaired and maintained as were the electronics and winches.  From what I was told by those in the know, the boat has been maintained well for at least a decade prior to my getting involved.  The sails on the boat are fine to get you around the course and the interior is original and in great shape.  So what’s wrong with the boat....nothing.   What’s wrong is that, excepting the rudder, as far as I know, everything is original, aluminum rig, and the rating systems don’t adjust for that so excepting a miracle you can’t win.  Having said that, as a nostalgic, I’d rather finish lower in the fleet speeding around in a 70 with little water on the deck than being on the podium in a tippy and uncomfortable washing machine.  Mirage is an opportunity waiting for someone that appreciates Bill Lee’s vision and wants to experience it.

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3 minutes ago, Mr. Nostalgic said:

As the last charterer of Mirage from spring ‘17 to summer ‘18 I can verify that Mirage is a GREAT boat.  Prior to the charter the rig and hull were surveyed (out of the water), some minor repairs were recommended and made and we went sailing and had a blast.  The engine was checked, repaired and maintained as were the electronics and winches.  From what I was told by those in the know, the boat has been maintained well for at least a decade prior to my getting involved.  The sails on the boat are fine to get you around the course and the interior is original and in great shape.  So what’s wrong with the boat....nothing.   What’s wrong is that, excepting the rudder, as far as I know, everything is original, aluminum rig, and the rating systems don’t adjust for that so excepting a miracle you can’t win.  Having said that, as a nostalgic, I’d rather finish lower in the fleet speeding around in a 70 with little water on the deck than being on the podium in a tippy and uncomfortable washing machine.  Mirage is an opportunity waiting for someone that appreciates Bill Lee’s vision and wants to experience it.

How is Johnny?  Haven’t seen him in 20 years.  It’s a little sad that his daughter was the only shining light out of the family.  She was feisty, just like her dad!  

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