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decided to make a night of it   left grimsby fish dock at first light friday port side light went west - but I had a set of temporary ones on board motorsailed all day then tw

I used to sail one of these   then in mid life one of these   now...... a telephone box on small tug    

four  words I do not care

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Just now, Panope said:

Most excellent, Dylan.  

I look forward to the forthcoming video of a fogbound fjord shot from the comfort of that wheel house.

Is the outboard motor intended to be primary propulsion or secondary?

Steve

it is for two reasons

 

the boat has not been to sea for five years - the engine has been run but there will be crud to stir up

and

I sail close to the edge when sailing. Twice a year  I get  fisherman's detritis and gear around my prop -

 

not the same fisherman obviously

 

he would be quite justified in being pissed off at me if it was always the same bloke

 

the outboard gives me a plan B when the old volvo shits on me as sailing out of trouble would be a challenge in a tub called the whale

I have done most of my sailing with an outbard bracket on the back and a long shaft slumbering aboard somewhere.  It has saved me a lot of embarassment over the years.

Being owed into port is too humiliating to contemplate

D

 

 

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4 minutes ago, dylan winter said:

it is for two reasons

 

the boat has not been to sea for five years - the engine has been run but there will be crud to stir up

and

I sail close to the edge when sailing. Twice a year  I get  fisherman's detritis and gear around my prop -

 

not the same fisherman obviously

 

he would be quite justified in being pissed off at me if it was always the same bloke

 

the outboard gives me a plan B when the old volvo shits on me as sailing out of trouble would be a challenge in a tub called the whale

I have done most of my sailing with an outbard bracket on the back and a long shaft slumbering aboard somewhere.  It has saved me a lot of embarassment over the years.

Being owed into port is too humiliating to contemplate

D

 

 

Cool.

Maybe outboard could also be used on a shore boat. 

Steve

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In the other thread, you mention launching, coming down the North Sea, and eventually into the Deben and home...where is the boat lying and how long do you anticipate the delivery will take? Delivery crew? I assume you will be documenting this first adventure in the whale...we shall look forward to it!

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18 minutes ago, Jim in Halifax said:

In the other thread, you mention launching, coming down the North Sea, and eventually into the Deben and home...where is the boat lying and how long do you anticipate the delivery will take? Delivery crew? I assume you will be documenting this first adventure in the whale...we shall look forward to it!

it is about 330 miles from Blyth - near newcastle to the Deben

first bit is day hops - lots of places to stop

 

after the humber it gets a bit harder

 

but two days and one night should do that bit

 

I have three days of sea trials this week so will see what progres I can expect during daylight hours and how easy she is to single hand

light at six am - dark at 8pm  - but daylight hours dropping fast 

I would rather not be arsing around in the dark in the north sea too much.

But I have time to sit in port waiting for the weather windows. 

as this is the east coast and westerlies are prevailing here it is generally sheltered and not too many lee shores.

D

 

 

 

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following my post on here PF has offered to send me a Maxie Metho with a grill he has had floating around his shed

all the way from Tassie

the web can be a wonderfully heart warming thing

I promise to keep it clean and cook only gourmet food on it

as well as grilled cheese on toast

baked beans and Fray Bentos pies

flat chips

egg banjos

D

IMG-0184.jpg

 

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3 hours ago, dylan winter said:

6hp long shaft tohatsu on the 9 foot clinker tender would be a challenge

D

 

You could always make a higher transom.  I have a longshaft/high transom project going on now albeit on a 12 footer

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12 minutes ago, dylan winter said:

following my post on here PF has offered to send me a Maxie Metho with a grill he has had floating around his shed

all the way from Tassie

the web can be a wonderfully heart warming thing

I promise to keep it clean and cook only gourmet food on it

as well as grilled cheese on toast

baked beans and Fray Bentos pies

flat chips

egg banjos

D

IMG-0184.jpg

 

They're nice little stoves. I 'modified' one (or a very similar unit) not so long ago for Troy & Pascale of Free Range Sailing. We took the griller part off to reduce the height.

FKT

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16 hours ago, dylan winter said:

old bloke without bikini wife  buys yet another four knot shit box

nothing to see here

 

move on lads

 

Oohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh no, we're going to have great fun with this.

"interior walls like a chip shop."  I died laughing when I read that.  I observed the green paint of a Volvo inboard. Yuck.

You do realize you could have applied anti-foul 3X faster with a roller than that itty bitty chip brush, right?  If that plotter is functional and has charts of a reasonable age, I'd think carefully before removing it.

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3 hours ago, Ajax said:

Oohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh no, we're going to have great fun with this.

"interior walls like a chip shop."  I died laughing when I read that.  I observed the green paint of a Volvo inboard. Yuck.

You do realize you could have applied anti-foul 3X faster with a roller than that itty bitty chip brush, right?  If that plotter is functional and has charts of a reasonable age, I'd think carefully before removing it.

lenovo tablet seems to do it all

 

and play music at the same time

D

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1 hour ago, SemiSalt said:

In your place, I'd be tempted to remove everything not bolted down, and only put back what you want or need. But, you might need a dumpster to hold it all.

The first thing I do with every new boat.

It's amazing the amount of useless crap that accumulates on a neglected boat.

I filled multiple dumpsters with the crap from a 43' I bought once.

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16 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

Fishcer 25. We need a drawing. I find this an amazingly clever layout in 25 feet of boat. 3D using varying levels, brilliant. 

4ea0fcc01289bf6bbb729bcf548224f9.jpg

Engine access is a nightmare though

 

Three hatches in the floor under the wheel House

 

It is like working down a man hole

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38 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

Fishcer 25. We need a drawing. I find this an amazingly clever layout in 25 feet of boat. 3D using varying levels, brilliant. 

4ea0fcc01289bf6bbb729bcf548224f9.jpg

Cool boat! Didn't Dylan look at one of these on his trip to Scotland? Seems the perfect vessel for sailing up North in the Summer. 

I'd be loathe to get rid of the in-board and that prop that's so nicely deep in the water. 

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12 minutes ago, Elegua said:

Cool boat! Didn't Dylan look at one of these on his trip to Scotland? Seems the perfect vessel for sailing up North in the Summer. 

I'd be loathe to get rid of the in-board and that prop that's so nicely deep in the water. 

Engine is staying

 

The outboard is for when the valve does what valves inevitably do

 

D

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35 minutes ago, dylan winter said:

Engine access is a nightmare though

 

Three hatches in the floor under the wheel House

 

It is like working down a man hole

I know the feeling. When we bought our Island Packet 31 tub, I was most impressed with the access via the lifting cockpit floor.  Then I found out that working on the engine requires one to dive in head first while supporting one's weight with one hand.  Grrrrr

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1 hour ago, Kris Cringle said:

Fishcer 25. We need a drawing. I find this an amazingly clever layout in 25 feet of boat. 3D using varying levels, brilliant. 

4ea0fcc01289bf6bbb729bcf548224f9.jpg

Thank you Kris!  I like it even more after seeing the drawing.  Although being 6'4" I think I would have to go full fetal to fit in the v birth.  Considering where Dylan sails though, that may be a feature.

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7 minutes ago, efrank said:
1 hour ago, Kris Cringle said:

4ea0fcc01289bf6bbb729bcf548224f9.jpg

Thank you Kris!  I like it even more after seeing the drawing.  Although being 6'4" I think I would have to go full fetal to fit in the v birth.  Considering where Dylan sails though, that may be a feature.

In the years-ago, I remember seeing pics of a catamaran built of two Fishers bolted together. Now I know what to get you for Christmas!

Didn't increase the V-berth space though.

FB- Doug

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 Our dock neighbor in SoCal lived aboard his Fischer 25 for many years. Nice size for a single guy without too much stuff to live aboard. One day he invited us out for a day sail around Anacapa Island. It was a beautiful, flat 12 knots from the west day and after 3 hours we were only halfway to the island 12 miles offshore.  In our H-28 in those conditions we would have already rounded the island and been well into the channel homeward by then.

We politely asked him to fire up the deisel  and head in as we had plans for supper that night.

Nice boat, well conceived and executed, and perhaps even fun to sail in a gale, but otherwise it's a motorboat IMHO.

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24 minutes ago, Willin' said:

 Our dock neighbor in SoCal lived aboard his Fischer 25 for many years. Nice size for a single guy without too much stuff to live aboard. One day he invited us out for a day sail around Anacapa Island. It was a beautiful, flat 12 knots from the west day and after 3 hours we were only halfway to the island 12 miles offshore.  In our H-28 in those conditions we would have already rounded the island and been well into the channel homeward by then.

We politely asked him to fire up the deisel  and head in as we had plans for supper that night.

Nice boat, well conceived and executed, and perhaps even fun to sail in a gale, but otherwise it's a motorboat IMHO.

Speed has not been important since I stopped racing

 

I am a patient man

 

I sailed the slug for 5 years

 

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2 hours ago, dylan winter said:

Engine access is a nightmare though

 

Three hatches in the floor under the wheel House

 

It is like working down a man hole

You need a gynaecologist, those guys can wallpaper a hall, stairs and landing through the letterbox. Your engine would be no problem.

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4 hours ago, dylan winter said:

Volvos suck

Old big flywheel Volvo's were great - except for that weird dynastarter and of course their extortionate parts prices.

To my mind they were what a marine diesel should be - heavy, slow turning lunkers with a monster flywheel to smooth things out

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11 minutes ago, dylan winter said:

If it craps out on me I will probably convert to electric

I'd really, really like to see you do that.

For a person who self-confessed hates 'fettling' any such conversion attempt will be hugely entertaining.

And when you're finished - if ever - you'll be able to enjoy maybe 20nm of range under power, in a boat designed to be a motor-sailer.

FKT

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1 minute ago, SloopJonB said:

Old big flywheel Volvo's were great - except for that weird dynastarter and of course their extortionate parts prices.

To my mind they were what a marine diesel should be - heavy, slow turning lunkers with a monster flywheel to smooth things out

Pretty much why I bought a Bukh.

FKT

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1 minute ago, SloopJonB said:

Old big flywheel Volvo's were great - except for that weird dynastarter and of course their extortionate parts prices.

To my mind they were what a marine diesel should be - heavy, slow turning lunkers with a monster flywheel to smooth things out

My md1 had a flywheel that would do justice to a tractor

It would also run at v low revs

V useful given that the cones were stuck in fwd gear

 

Made coming into a marina berth a ticklish affair

d

the dynastart was horrible

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Old big flywheel Volvo's were great - except for that weird dynastarter and of course their extortionate parts prices.

To my mind they were what a marine diesel should be - heavy, slow turning lunkers with a monster flywheel to smooth things out

Same thing with those Ford Lehman 4 and 6 cyls. Stone axe technology that just won't die. 

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11 hours ago, IStream said:

Same thing with those Ford Lehman 4 and 6 cyls. Stone axe technology that just won't die. 

the volvos rot from the inside outwards

 

and volvo parts are made of unobtainium

 

I worked as a tractor and forklift mechanic for a couple of  summers

 

so easy to work on

no bilges to lose stuff in for starters

 

 

D

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Very happy to see you back, Dylan. Ought to be a bit more dry than the cockpit of a Centaur, though getting to the back end of my MD2B feels the same. I just lay down in the cockpit and work halfway upside down, best with a lady friend to pass tools down and what not. Quality relationship time.

Good luck on the clutter. I've been clearing stuff out of the Centaur for six months now, and still sorting out the wheat from the chaf. Found leather cup seals for the hand pump on the kerosene heater's tank yesterday...

ACtC-3fTFzuynMxfE0Zt_vu8QY1YjDYM_6OlJBrz

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8 hours ago, dylan winter said:

the volvos rot from the inside outwards

 

and volvo parts are made of unobtainium

 

I worked as a tractor and forklift mechanic for a couple of  summers

 

so easy to work on

no bilges to lose stuff in for starters

 

 

D

Is there reason to believe the Volvo has problems? What are the details (age, history), of this engine? 

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Just now, Kris Cringle said:

Is there reason to believe the Volvo has problems? What are the details (age, history), of this engine? 

1998,

volvo 2030

 

2,500 hours

 

indirect cooling

 

new exhaust elbow

 

not run at sea for seven years

 

I am expecting the fuel supply to give me gyp

 

no glass water trap, no fuel guage

 

fingers crossed = and god bless the tohatsu - which is now in the back of the prius and will be driven to northumberland in the morning

 

hopefully the new outboard bracket will be delivered to the marina weds and I can drill soome holes in the transom

launching at 5.30 in the evening

mankie weather thursday/friday so I will head out into the north sea and give the boat a bit of a thrashing - see if anything is minded to break

D

 

 

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10 minutes ago, dylan winter said:

1998,

volvo 2030

 

2,500 hours

 

indirect cooling

 

new exhaust elbow

 

not run at sea for seven years

 

I am expecting the fuel supply to give me gyp

 

no glass water trap, no fuel guage

 

fingers crossed = and god bless the tohatsu - which is now in the back of the prius and will be driven to northumberland in the morning

 

hopefully the new outboard bracket will be delivered to the marina weds and I can drill soome holes in the transom

launching at 5.30 in the evening

mankie weather thursday/friday so I will head out into the north sea and give the boat a bit of a thrashing - see if anything is minded to break

D

 

 

You could have a good one there. Not that old, not that many hours. It may have survived the storage period unscathed. Have you been able to start it or are you waiting to launch?

The outboard bracket is a smart insurance move. 

I found a shot of access from above. Doesn't look too bad. 

123465488gallery_wm.jpg

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1 minute ago, Kris Cringle said:

You could have a good one there. Not that old, not that many hours. It may have survived the storage period unscathed. Have you been able to start it or are you waiting to launch?

The outboard bracket is a smart insurance move. 

I heard it start from cold and fired right up after two seconds of cranking - this was ashore - so not run long enough to get hot.

it was the only thing I asked the owner to do - the rest  I can see for myself

I am a bit of a pessimist with inboards

I remember staring down at the broken MD1 through  cockpit hatch the dimensions of a teatray on the mirror offshore and having no idea how to get the spares other than buy another dead engine and cannibalising the two

bastard things

I prefer outboards in wells because you can just go buy another one from  ebay - and carry a spare

but I hope the engine should be okay - heat exchanger and not yet that old

fingers crossed

D

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A well-found inboard diesel is wonderful thing. Here's my drill with a new-to-me diesel:

Replace everything made of rubber (belts, hoses, impeller)

Pickle the heat exchanger

Sort out the fuel filter setup and make sure you have an easy way to bleed air out of the fuel lines

Clean and coat the starter and alternator electrical connections

Change the oil and filter, run her hard for 30 minutes, and change them again

After that, you're very likely to enjoy thousands of trouble-free hours with just the usual oil and impeller changes.

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23 minutes ago, dylan winter said:

I heard it start from cold and fired right up after two seconds of cranking - this was ashore - so not run long enough to get hot.

it was the only thing I asked the owner to do - the rest  I can see for myself

I am a bit of a pessimist with inboards [...] bastard things[...]

but I hope the engine should be okay - heat exchanger and not yet that old

fingers crossed

D

I love a good diesel...or getting an old diesel purring again. Just my outlook. I had a Volvo MD6A that everyone told me was junk; it was reborn and is still going strong 20 years later AFAIK. The only complaint I had with Volvo was the cost of parts, but they were cheaper in the UK at that time, as I recall. I prefer Yanmar nowadays but I wouldn't give up on a Volvo.

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Just now, Jim in Halifax said:

I love a good diesel...or getting an old diesel purring again. Just my outlook. I had a Volvo MD6A that everyone told me was junk; it was reborn and is still going strong 20 years later AFAIK. The only complaint I had with Volvo was the cost of parts, but they were cheaper in the UK at that time, as I recall. I prefer Yanmar nowadays but I wouldn't give up on a Volvo.

I will not give up on it until it gives up on me

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4 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

That it started right up means a great deal. I feel good about this one,.... 

the volvo in the first centaur needed a lot of  heat and 20 seconds of agonising cranking

 

the second centaur had a one hour old beta that started right away

this 20 year old lump  kicked into life just as quickly - so I am optimistic

 

but also pessimistic too

 

I have also got used to having a boat free of the reek of diesel while sailing the traiiler sailer which had petrol and meths on board but no diesel

this one smells like an oil refinery

D

 

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The VP 2030 is a great engine, Perkins base.

Not surprisingly I also have a spare one in my shed Dylan...

My local boat has a 2003 on a saildrive, the 2030 is a direct replacement if the old motor ever plays up, I am not wasting my money on repairing a 2003.

If the PO started your 2030 up without connecting the cooling water, the impeller will be toast....
 

I am really a Yanmar guy, but living with a Volvo has been interesting, they have their quirks but are surprisingly good engines. The story I heard to explain their market share is that builders don’t have to pay VP for the motor until the boat is sold, so they get credit right through the build and commissioning period.

Then VP has a captive owner to milk for the rest of the boats life.

 

 

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It would be a good idea to hire a fuel polisher to clean your tanks.  There is bound to be plenty of goop in there and probably a little water too.  The machines those guys use clean both the tank itself and the fuel in it.  Even if the fuel is 7 years old you can still use it after polishing.  The process will also remove whatever water is in the tanks.  Drain and refill the separator bowl, change the impeller, replace the filter and you should be good to go.  Saying that the engine runs well on land doesn't cut it.  As soon as the boat starts bouncing around on the ocean the goop will lift up into suspension and clog the filter.  I agree that you should replace everything made of rubber and you should also pull out the heat exchanger and clean it.  There is bound to be a pile of salt scale in there.

I have been through this routine.  My boat had been sitting in a yard for 3 years when I bought it.

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^ this ^

A good fuel filter, that can be easily accessed and filter changed and water seperator bowl drained, is really a must-have on a boat that relies on a diesel engine.

Not a bad idea for gasoline engines, either, but really important for diesels. I'm constantly amazed at the number of cruisers with persistent fuel problems who chase after some magic pill instead of fixing the basics.

FB- Doug

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2 hours ago, dylan winter said:

the volvo in the first centaur needed a lot of  heat and 20 seconds of agonising cranking

 

the second centaur had a one hour old beta that started right away

this 20 year old lump  kicked into life just as quickly - so I am optimistic

 

but also pessimistic too

 

I have also got used to having a boat free of the reek of diesel while sailing the traiiler sailer which had petrol and meths on board but no diesel

this one smells like an oil refinery

D

 

If you can smell diesel then you have a leak.

Fix it.

No smell.

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2 hours ago, dylan winter said:

the volvo in the first centaur needed a lot of  heat and 20 seconds of agonising cranking

 

the second centaur had a one hour old beta that started right away

this 20 year old lump  kicked into life just as quickly - so I am optimistic

 

but also pessimistic too

 

I have also got used to having a boat free of the reek of diesel while sailing the traiiler sailer which had petrol and meths on board but no diesel

this one smells like an oil refinery

D

 

With a clean bilge and a fuel system that doesn't leak, you should never smell diesel inside the boat.

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19 minutes ago, IStream said:

With a clean bilge and a fuel system that doesn't leak, you should never smell diesel inside the boat.

If you have a puke bottle, re-breather on an older unit or a very good engine fan. 

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1 hour ago, savoir said:

Here is some of the goop that came out of one of my tanks.  You don't want this much clogging thee fuel lines.

 

DSCN0138.JPG

 

Savoir is absolutely correct.  @dylan winter, you hate fettling.  In order to minimize the amount of fettling that you'll have to do to the engine, clean the fuel, clean the tank, replace the filters and carry plenty of spare filters.

Based on the fact that the engine started and ran easily, if you just clean the fuel, the tank and replace the filters you might forestall any other corrective maintenance.

I will say that my boat sat on the hard for 6 years with 1/4 tank of diesel in it. That means lots of empty volume for water condensation to accumulate over the years.  Like you, I had the owner perform a very brief engine test on the hard. The engine fired up in 3 revolutions and I was stunned.  I had him shut it down after just a few minutes.

I pumped out the remaining fuel, swabbed out the tank, replaced the filters before launching the boat and I've had nothing but happy times for the last 4 years.

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It doesn't sound like Dylan has that much time. All good advice on fuel but why assume the tank is dirty?

If he has no gauge then perhaps he has a fill pipe that you 'stick' to check fuel tank contents. If so, he could easily run a hose down the fill pipe that is attached to a drill pump, find the bottom or lowest corner,  and pull out a pint or so from the bottom into a clear container.

That would tell him if he had water or other contamination. I had to remove the fuel sender and run a hose down to the bottom of my tanks. They had not been cleaned for at least 30 years and spend most of the year varying between 1/2 and full. 

I pumped from the lowest crevice the stiff hose could find and filled a couple of coke bottles full. This is one of the samples. Maybe it's our colder climate but I've never had problems with growth type contaminations in diesel tanks. 

1948772318_Dieselsample.thumb.jpg.63d6cdcfa36fd8c0c34028c1b541b889.jpg

 

 

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1 hour ago, Kris Cringle said:

It doesn't sound like Dylan has that much time. All good advice on fuel but why assume the tank is dirty?

If he has no gauge then perhaps he has a fill pipe that you 'stick' to check fuel tank contents. If so, he could easily run a hose down the fill pipe that is attached to a drill pump, find the bottom or lowest corner,  and pull out a pint or so from the bottom into a clear container.

That would tell him if he had water or other contamination. I had to remove the fuel sender and run a hose down to the bottom of my tanks. They had not been cleaned for at least 30 years and spend most of the year varying between 1/2 and full. 

I pumped from the lowest crevice the stiff hose could find and filled a couple of coke bottles full. This is one of the samples. Maybe it's our colder climate but I've never had problems with growth type contaminations in diesel tanks. 

1948772318_Dieselsample.thumb.jpg.63d6cdcfa36fd8c0c34028c1b541b889.jpg

 

 

If you can see inside the tank, even through a small hole, an oil suction extractor pump on a bit of aluminium pipe does the trick.

I have a removable port, and suck out  all of the crappy fuel I can see, but if I didn’t have a port I could do the job through a small opening with the help of an endoscopic camera.

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I did it by removing my fuel tank level sender and snapping photos with my phone camera pressed against the opening. I was able to cran the camera around several different angles for a complete view of the tank.

You can probably buy a cheap, endo cam that connects to your phone on Amazon now.

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It floats, does not leak yet, windy wet shitty day for a boat launch

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=_EgqWlMXgX8

Now down below on pontoon in blyth Harbour

Fan heater, good WiFi

The rain is pounding on the windows

About to start sympathetically  sifting the remains of another man's marine gubbins while healthily eating gouda and ryevita

 

the previous owner single handed her to shetland when he was 72

 

Goodonim

D

 

 

 

 

 

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There is no way that a diesel tank can sit for years and not attract moisture.  The muck in the tank is dead bugs and those bugs live in the water not in the diesel.  The muck sits on the bottom of the tank and stays there until the boat starts bouncing around on the ocean.  Running the motor while the boat is on land doesn't prove anything.

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