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Under severe pressure from SWMBO I tackled cleaning up my workbench this weekend. Under the workbench is a box of sailing stuff...blocks, fairleads, a couple of winches, shackles, wire and so on.  The sources for this stuff vary from relatively recent...a few months ago, to "lost in the mists of time". 

In the "Mists" category, I came across this little treasure from my days of racing Mercuries out of Stillwater Cove in 9th grade. SOMEWHERE....I think. I ~think~ I still have a Line Seven foulie jacket.

All right, what you got?

timer.JPG

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3 minutes ago, Alan H said:

Under severe pressure from SWMBO I tackled cleaning up my workbench this weekend. Under the workbench is a box of sailing stuff...blocks, fairleads, a couple of winches, shackles, wire and so on.  The sources for this stuff vary from relatively recent...a few months ago, to "lost in the mists of time". 

In the "Mists" category, I came across this little treasure from my days of racing Mercuries out of Stillwater Cove in 9th grade. SOMEWHERE....I think. I ~think~ I still have a Line Seven foulie jacket.

All right, what you got?

timer.JPG

I still use an ancient windup stop watch for things like bouy flash sequences 

hand tool

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D0EB3E13-00C1-4A37-B529-A62634B1AE1D.thumb.jpeg.6dcc8a023b06305640e2091b2d94af2a.jpeg

These came off the 1958 Block Island 40 many years ago. They are 60s era. Sent them to Switzerland for repair and mounted them on a piece of broken teak from the 40 to install in my vintage ride. Lots of very large blocks and fittings were in the same vicinity but would look less appropriate in the car. 

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1 hour ago, IStream said:

What brand are those two large blocks on the left? Beautiful industrial design.

Made in the USA in the 60s and 70s by APM with stainless steel needle roller bearings.  Standard runner blocks on 12-metres, and mast-base blocks too.  Wonderful design and build.

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12 hours ago, Mr Moab said:

Come on, where are your j-locks ?   
I know you have ‘em somewhere. 

I had a pair of the Sparcraft version, but gave 'em to John Sweeney to use on his fleet of AC boats on SF Bay 10 years ago.

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14 hours ago, Alaris said:

D0EB3E13-00C1-4A37-B529-A62634B1AE1D.thumb.jpeg.6dcc8a023b06305640e2091b2d94af2a.jpeg

These came off the 1958 Block Island 40 many years ago. They are 60s era. Sent them to Switzerland for repair and mounted them on a piece of broken teak from the 40 to install in my vintage ride. Lots of very large blocks and fittings were in the same vicinity but would look less appropriate in the car. 

Very nice!

Hobot just posted this pic on the Random Pic thread.  Looke like a Mille Miglia Jaguar.  You can see the two clocks on the dash, similar to yours.  Excellent.

1952-Jaguar-C-Type-1480x987.thumb.jpeg.d9d864043275097fc9e038dda3b295fe.jpeg

 

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I think it’s one of those “it’s always been done this way” kind of things. The sheets are spliced on. They’re the smallest ones that were available when the boat was built in the 90s so they are not nearly as gnarly as some of the ones I’ve seen but yes I agree soft shackles would probably be better.

Bowman only goes forward for the spinnaker set/douse and the mast is fine. 

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22 hours ago, P_Wop said:

Very nice!

Hobot just posted this pic on the Random Pic thread.  Looke like a Mille Miglia Jaguar.  You can see the two clocks on the dash, similar to yours.  Excellent.

1952-Jaguar-C-Type-1480x987.thumb.jpeg.d9d864043275097fc9e038dda3b295fe.jpeg

 

I like the spare set of plugs, readily to hand.

Lucas distributor?

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2 hours ago, P_Wop said:

Here's a VERY old skool item.  On my last trip to the Isle of Wight I found several of these in a tattered cardboard box at Hayles' chandlers in Yarmouth.

20160614_112159.jpg.666bc31e0b9de2550067ea48c58005d9.jpg

So, what, you've got a bucket of oakum n the garage too?

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Well as a matter of fact. 

I don't think its oakum, not even sure if its suitable  but I think my dad used it to cork the seams on his 1939 motor sailer.  (Been there done that, right along with him).  Dad and boat are long gone but this was in his shed and I kept it all these years.  Now I'd like to run it up to Sampson Boat company and see if Leo could use it on Tally Ho.

  

P1030559.JPG

P1030560.JPG

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5 hours ago, woodpecker said:

You know why people in England drink warm beer?


 

 


They have Lucas refrigerators.

It's about 5 decades past the expiry date of that one.

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On 9/22/2020 at 7:32 AM, slug zitski said:

I still use an ancient windup stop watch for things like bouy flash sequences 

hand tool

Have you tried just counting? If it is a west cardinal you can always just slip one of your Croc's off.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Love the trip down memory lane, I have stuff from the 40's, 50's from sailing with my grandfather as a kid, learned on a Flattie (Geary 18), spent every summer on our Owens Cutter.  More stuff from one design in the 60's 70's 80's.  Wait, I can't be this old, can I???

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On 9/24/2020 at 11:36 PM, eric1207 said:

Well as a matter of fact. 

I don't think its oakum, not even sure if its suitable  but I think my dad used it to cork the seams on his 1939 motor sailer.  (Been there done that, right along with him).  Dad and boat are long gone but this was in his shed and I kept it all these years.  Now I'd like to run it up to Sampson Boat company and see if Leo could use it on Tally Ho.

  

P1030559.JPG

P1030560.JPG

Whatever you do, just don’t smoke it 

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7 hours ago, USA 236 said:

I have titanium Gibb trigger shackles on my MORC custom boat. 

I remember back in the early part of the 80's, racing on my first real ocean racer (a Swan 44,  the S&s one), and losing a brace (guy) overboard.

I couldn't understand why the owner was quite so upset at the loss,  while excitable, as an experienced & old seaman he usually took these sorts of losses well unless negligence or stupidity was the cause. Being young and silly at the time I made things worse by saying something along the lines of oh well at least we have a full roll of that line in the locker.

His reply,  that he didn't give a F... about the line,  it was the $400 titanium clip on the end that he would have to fly to the US (from Tasmania),  to replace.

It shows my inexperience at the time that I was surprised to see a new brace with titanium clip on board the next week.  The bugger bought then by the box!

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On 9/24/2020 at 2:24 PM, P_Wop said:

Here's a VERY old skool item.  On my last trip to the Isle of Wight I found several of these in a tattered cardboard box at Hayles' chandlers in Yarmouth.

20160614_112159.jpg.666bc31e0b9de2550067ea48c58005d9.jpg

Multiple sizes of caulking irons, on top of an Osborne Ship Scraper. All purchased new, by me, ±50 years ago.   I have a couple of the scrapers and use them all the time, mostly as thin pry bars. If the ends get chipped or worn, just heat to cherry red and pound out a new edge. Great tool. I see you can still buy them.  

And a box full of Tufnol dinghy blocks. 

IMG_2317.thumb.jpeg.9ba5262377bd37a6a35041f0b8347976.jpeg

I was at Carmel HS in the late 60's and you reminded me of the Mercurys at Stillwater- had forgotten about that. 

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Inherited from a distant relative many years ago, who apparently wore it aboard "Ondine" when she broke the Sydney to Hobart record in 1962. Zips still working, and one of these days I'll get the corroded press stud replaced. 

20200507_124204.jpg

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7 hours ago, Oceanconcepts said:

Multiple sizes of caulking irons, on top of an Osborne Ship Scraper. All purchased new, by me, ±50 years ago.   I have a couple of the scrapers and use them all the time, mostly as thin pry bars. If the ends get chipped or worn, just heat to cherry red and pound out a new edge. Great tool. I see you can still buy them.  

And a box full of Tufnol dinghy blocks. 

IMG_2317.thumb.jpeg.9ba5262377bd37a6a35041f0b8347976.jpeg

I was at Carmel HS in the late 60's and you reminded me of the Mercurys at Stillwater- had forgotten about that. 

Send this to Leo!

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14 hours ago, ALL@SEA said:

Inherited from a distant relative many years ago, who apparently wore it aboard "Ondine" when she broke the Sydney to Hobart record in 1962. Zips still working, and one of these days I'll get the corroded press stud replaced. 

20200507_124204.jpg

I assume the 10' pole has something to do with the smell?

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On 10/6/2020 at 8:56 PM, 10thTonner said:

1.JPG

2.JPG

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Yeah - I have one of those too. I used it on my OK dinghy early 80'ies. But take a look at the video where Ken Read gives a tour of Comanche. That is the exact compass they have on that boat. I guess the rules say that they have to have a magnetic compass - this was the lightet they could find. Pretty good design to survive for 40 years.

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On 10/9/2020 at 3:31 PM, daan62 said:

mine is on the boat... (also still in the original box)

do you also have the bracket? (i still have mine)

Argh, shit! I sold the bracket together with my old boat! 
 

(I think they still make them, don’t they?) 

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1 hour ago, 10thTonner said:

Argh, shit! I sold the bracket together with my old boat! 
 

(I think they still make them, don’t they?) 

A piece of PVC pipe screwed to the bulkhead works just fine.

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On 10/9/2020 at 11:40 AM, Oceanconcepts said:

Multiple sizes of caulking irons, on top of an Osborne Ship Scraper. All purchased new, by me, ±50 years ago.   I have a couple of the scrapers and use them all the time, mostly as thin pry bars. If the ends get chipped or worn, just heat to cherry red and pound out a new edge. Great tool. I see you can still buy them.  

And a box full of Tufnol dinghy blocks. 

IMG_2317.thumb.jpeg.9ba5262377bd37a6a35041f0b8347976.jpeg

I was at Carmel HS in the late 60's and you reminded me of the Mercurys at Stillwater- had forgotten about that. 

CHS Class of '75.

I have a mess of tufnol blocks in that same box I pulled the stopwatch out of. I'm restoring a Piper One Design, built in '72 and of course it came out, originally with tufnol blocks. I'm torn between updating everything and using my leftover Harken self-tailing winches, or going Old Skool with the boat and using all the tufnol stuff I've got, plus whatever I can scrounge up.   Try and find those old Gibb winches, tho...not so easy.

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4 hours ago, Alan H said:

CHS Class of '75.

I have a mess of tufnol blocks in that same box I pulled the stopwatch out of. I'm restoring a Piper One Design, built in '72 and of course it came out, originally with tufnol blocks. I'm torn between updating everything and using my leftover Harken self-tailing winches, or going Old Skool with the boat and using all the tufnol stuff I've got, plus whatever I can scrounge up.   Try and find those old Gibb winches, tho...not so easy.

Go for less friction, go modern for the running rigging.  You can always spray paint the Harkens baby shit brown for effect.

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It's a shame that new gear is not as indestructible as those horrible Tufnol things. I'm sure most sailors have some of that stuff kicking around.

Archeologists centuries from now will be finding it the way we find Roman bronze.

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On 9/22/2020 at 11:39 AM, P_Wop said:

The Harken bullet block for scale.

shackles_sm.jpg

That's a bunch of great memories,,,,,,  Larger blocks are APM (American Precision Marine) from the early 70's, designed for 12 meter loads

. The Sparcraft is a #8, original Ted Mangles patent, 17- 4PH not Titanium,

 

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19 hours ago, Alan H said:

CHS Class of '75.

I have a mess of tufnol blocks in that same box I pulled the stopwatch out of. I'm restoring a Piper One Design, built in '72 and of course it came out, originally with tufnol blocks. I'm torn between updating everything and using my leftover Harken self-tailing winches, or going Old Skool with the boat and using all the tufnol stuff I've got, plus whatever I can scrounge up.   Try and find those old Gibb winches, tho...not so easy.

I was CHS class of 69-70 (complicated times) and one of the group that started the Pottery. 

Piper OD looks like a lovely boat and well worth the effort- since going bigger from my Aphrodite 101 I miss having the ability to be on the water sailing in minutes, solo or not, in an uncomplicated way. 

I'd advocate for modern blocks- they just work so much better. I have a Finn dinghy, molded wood from 1954, believed to be US #11. That has been outfitted with new style gear, though still has the original spruce mast, a thing of beauty. I need to get that back out on the water... 

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On 9/26/2020 at 6:43 PM, solosailor said:

I used to carry a jar of Lucas replacement wire smoke.   

What did Sir Lucas tell his wife just before he died?

”Darling, don't drive after dark.”

 

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There's a story behind the Finn. I bought it in the late '70's in Seattle, though it was from the Bay Area and had been owned by Peter Sutter- I bought it from his son. I sailed it off the Shillshole I-14 dock for several years. I loved sailing that boat, watching the sun set over the Olympics. As simple and pure as sailing gets. 

I moved to Santa Cruz in the mid 80's to go to work for West Marine,  just when they moved HQ there- which ended up being a short lived career choice. But in the turmoil of moving, the Finn & trailer were stolen from the Santa Cruz yacht harbor parking lot. I filed a police report, but not much could be done. I still had the sail & other gear, which I held on to for some reason. 

Forward to 2001- I'm living in Seattle, but frequently flying to the Bay Area. Just prior to a trip I see an ad in Latitude 38 for a wood "Fin" dinghy, no sail. I call,  get the address, and resolve to go by- the seller says he won't be around but I can look at the boat. He doesn't seem to know much about it other than it is called a Finn, and it has no sail. 

I get to the address- it's a rough looking neighborhood, bars on the windows of the houses, pit bulls in the yards behind the chain link fences- I pull up, and it's my old boat. It's been sitting in the open, uncovered, for 16 years and is much the worse for wear, but it has the kick up rudder I made, the trailer we welded, the mast- though peeling, is intact- there was absolutely no doubt.

I pulled into a parking lot nearby and call the San Jose Police. "I realize this is going to be a strange story, but it's true, and I'd like some advice on what I can do." I connected with an officer in the auto theft division, who amazingly listened to my story and took notes. When I give him the address he strongly advised me against going back there or confronting the seller- I was on a schedule in any case. He promised to look into it, and I figured I would never hear more about it. 

A few weeks later I get a call from the SJPD officer. The found the Santa Cruz theft report, and want to know if I can provide identifying information about the boat- which I can- things like the color of the glue lines in hidden areas. A few days later I get a call that they have recovered and impounded the boat. It seems the seller was unfamiliar with the boat, could not say how he got it, and displayed little interest in pursuing the matter when confronted with the theft report. It's mine if I come pick it up and pay the minor impound fees. 

I drove down to San Jose, had the trailer repaired to make it roadworthy, and returned the boat to Seattle. I eventually re-laminated some small damaged sections around the CB trunk, but the hull was sound. The decks needed to be completely replaced. I still had all the parts- comes from hanging on to that old skool gear, I guess.

It's been on a trailer under a cover in my side yard for at the last few years now, as other, bigger boats took over. It needs a small bit of work to get out sailing, but it's looking good again. I wish I had it ready this summer, with covid it would have been great sailing therapy. But other tasks got in the way. I don't have a good place to work on it indoors, so at this point it probably needs to wait for spring.

But yeah, it needs to be out sailing. 

Pic is what it looked like after recovery, with the decks just stripped off. 

PA040001.thumb.JPG.3cc498adc00046953174cdba523f1bc3.JPG

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There are a few Finn Woodies getting the full restoration treatment at the moment - ISO projects. The results have been magnificent with hours & hours spent stripping and epoxying and varnishing....and worth every minute! Good luck with the resto - and please post pics!

 

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  • 1 month later...

Somewhere in the back of the shed is an Old hand held RDF, back from the days when Lighthouses put out a Morse code identifying signal.

Also In the shed is also an old part used tin of TBT antifoul.

There's a variety of old Tufnol Blocks, acquired over the years.

 

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On 9/21/2020 at 11:28 PM, Alan H said:

Under severe pressure from SWMBO I tackled cleaning up my workbench this weekend. Under the workbench is a box of sailing stuff...blocks, fairleads, a couple of winches, shackles, wire and so on.  The sources for this stuff vary from relatively recent...a few months ago, to "lost in the mists of time". 

In the "Mists" category, I came across this little treasure from my days of racing Mercuries out of Stillwater Cove in 9th grade. SOMEWHERE....I think. I ~think~ I still have a Line Seven foulie jacket.

All right, what you got?

timer.JPG

Even though I started sailing during the 80s, I've never seen one of these. What is it for? Counting minutes toward the start ?

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30 minutes ago, Alan H said:

Panoramix...that's exactly what it is!   And I've still got it on my desk. If anybody wants it, PM me with a mailing address and I'll send it to you.

Thanks, I am just old enough to have experienced the 10+5 minutes procedure but not quite old enough for the mechanical countdown watch. These 10 minutes faffing around the line were long!

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On 12/11/2020 at 12:54 PM, Alan H said:

Panoramix...that's exactly what it is!   And I've still got it on my desk. If anybody wants it, PM me with a mailing address and I'll send it to you.

I raced with a Heuer countdown watch. 1976 in the GP-14. I can't seem to find it.

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Ok - Tufnol all good...IMG_2207.thumb.JPG.04ccca4300abec1ead9e5ec74a76d921.JPG

 

...Bot wot about these babies?IMG_2205.thumb.JPG.cad32630aa5d929b8de9178b90936abd.JPG

(Actually I don't know if these were ever used on a boat. Could be some gear from some construction site from the 1950's... My father gave them to me and even he didn't know where they were from. He did use the Tufnol stuff on his boats in the 1960s at least.)

 

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