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Cold Feet, But Not Sea Boots


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I see the thread on waterproof socks.

I think a good many of us want something more nimble than boots for winter (not shoulder season) sailing. I've worn...

  • Goretex shoes with fleece socks. Good if there is just some spray or a little water splashing in the cockpit. Comfortable. My usual wear.
  • Deck shoes with waterproof socks. Not very warm, unless you can fit another pair of socks inside. Gets sweaty. But pretty good.
  • Dry suit with attached feet with deck shoes. You need to be a size up on the deck shoes, which is clumsy. Not real comfortable.
  • Dinghy boots, either with dry suit or fleece socks. Warm with a dry suit in any conditions, but not that comfortable. More comfortable with fleece socks, but not very warm.

What say you?  I feel like I don't have the right combination for cold, wet, sporty conditions. Or maybe that's all there is.

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One of my pairs of "waterproof/breathable" socks are as thick as rag wool socks. Very warm, way too warm for anything except winter wet sailing. If your feet sweat, you will feel moisture, mine do but still way more comfy than seaboots for me.

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21 hours ago, slug zitski said:

The dubarry sea boots are first class

expensive and clumsy for everyday use when cruising 

 

the problem with the dubarry boots (and i think with a lot of sailing gear) is that the Gore-Tex is subject to failure,

Dubarry replaced my boots, which is great, but i'd rather they just stayed waterproof.

i have had jackets and pants replaced by Musto and other manufacturers because of Gore-Tex delamination inside the "lifetime" of the garment.

 

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I've been wearing an attached-foot drysuit inside deck shoes for a few years, and so far, no leaks. If there were, they could be patched. I haven't tried waterproof socks in 30 years; I was not impressed for hiking boots, but this is different (lower mileage, less dirt) and they've gotten a lot cheaper. Time to try them again. I see Gill sells them now. Any experience?

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On 9/25/2020 at 6:38 AM, us7070 said:

 

the problem with the dubarry boots (and i think with a lot of sailing gear) is that the Gore-Tex is subject to failure,

 

I have had many gore-tex shoes, jackets, and pants over the years and it has been my experience, consistently, that the gore-tex does not last for the life of the garment.

It is also my observation that no one who works outside in the weather on a daily/ongoing basis uses any of this stuff.

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  • 2 months later...
On 9/23/2020 at 8:47 PM, thinwater said:

I see the thread on waterproof socks.

I think a good many of us want something more nimble than boots for winter (not shoulder season) sailing. I've worn...

  • Goretex shoes with fleece socks. Good if there is just some spray or a little water splashing in the cockpit. Comfortable. My usual wear.
  • Deck shoes with waterproof socks. Not very warm, unless you can fit another pair of socks inside. Gets sweaty. But pretty good.
  • Dry suit with attached feet with deck shoes. You need to be a size up on the deck shoes, which is clumsy. Not real comfortable.
  • Dinghy boots, either with dry suit or fleece socks. Warm with a dry suit in any conditions, but not that comfortable. More comfortable with fleece socks, but not very warm.

What say you?  I feel like I don't have the right combination for cold, wet, sporty conditions. Or maybe that's all there is.

I've had fair success with foam neoprene socks.  Your feet sweat, but they stay pretty warm.  Keeping the moisture inside keeps it from outer socks and shoes, so their insulation my do a better job.  That's more of a snow camping thing than sailing, since any outer footwear would still likely end up wet, but the neoprene socks aren't bad.  Have to match thickness to shoe size.

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On 9/26/2020 at 9:29 PM, 2airishuman said:

It is also my observation that no one who works outside in the weather on a daily/ongoing basis uses any of this stuff.

IIRC, that was Matt Rutherford's conclusion while underway on his round-the-Americas solo trip-- he threw the fancy ($$$) stuff away and reverted to what commercial fishermen use: rubberized Grundens (and the like)

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I wear a pair of rubber soled scuba booties with a pair of wool socks inside. You can stay warm even if your feet get wet. 

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On 12/7/2020 at 6:29 PM, Baldur said:

I wear a pair of rubber soled scuba booties with a pair of wool socks inside. You can stay warm even if your feet get wet. 

I have been thinking about doing this. Do you ever get water trapped in the shoe and end up spending long periods of time walking around with submerged feet. Fear of this is the reason I haven't bought a pair yet. I figured out a long time ago with backwoods hiking. In wet areas don't try to keep your feet dry (You Can't) instead the boot needs to let the water out. I know it is a different environment on a sailboat.

BTW I used my hiking boots on-board at first worked wonderful until I picked up a rock somewhere in the tread and damaged some Gel coat. 

JJ

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