Jump to content

Daysailer for old people


Recommended Posts

My parents (75 & 76) have decided that since our transition to the dark side (bought a trawler this spring & sold our First 405) they miss sailing enough that they want something they can take out themselves on San Diego bay.  My mom's mobility isn't great.  Dad used to have a C&C24 about 15 years ago.  Honestly I may well end up be the one who sails it much of the time, but it should be as easy to handle as possible.  No accommodation necessary.  Beauty is imperative.  I've been showing them stuff as it comes on the market & they've gotten most excited about old wooden Herreshoffs (a Rozinante and a 12 1/2), though they're not really interested in the level of maintenance they require.  

I think an Alerion 28 ticks just about all of the boxes but they are pricey and a bit bigger than required.  There's a Morris 29 but obscenely expensive.  Something smaller like a Schock Harbor 20 might work, Pearson Ensign maybe.  There's hardly anything suitable available right now on YW, CL, or sailboat listings, so if anyone knows of anything please let me know.  No firm budget, but something in the $20-30k range or lower would be easiest to stomach.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 598
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

The happy conclusion of this thread is finally here!  Just took her out on her maiden voyage in San Diego.  Wonderful afternoon for a mellow shakedown sail; 4-6kts of boat speed in 5-10kts out of the

Update: funds have been transferred & documentation is complete!  We have a boat!   She should arrive here on Wednesday or Thursday; Driscoll yard will splash her and Rigworks will tension th

All packed up and ready to go.  Should arrive on Thursday!

Posted Images

Maybe a Cape Dory Typhoon, 22, or 25. It should be pretty easy to modify to have a self tacking jib. There are a bunch on Sailboatlistings.com for cheap to dirt cheap. Sure they are all over the country, but they are small enough to trailer back to San Diego easily.

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Bull City said:

H-Boat. 27 feet. My wife and I are almost 72.

How's the access to the outboard?  That's the one thing I worry about with them.  There's one listed via a really crappy craigslist ad not too far away: 

https://losangeles.craigslist.org/lgb/boa/d/long-beach-baltic-design-27ft/7205303948.html

13 minutes ago, See Level said:

Harbor 20?

I think that'd be a great choice - you'd think they'd be available here but can't find one.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, socalrider said:

How's the access to the outboard?  That's the one thing I worry about with them.  There's one listed via a really crappy craigslist ad not too far away: 

Honestly? Not great. Hadn't thought about that.

I think having a small cabin in a daysailer is a good idea. Ensign would be a good choice too.

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, weightless said:

Why wood? I know that there are fiberglass Fish class with inboards. I think there are glass Buzzards Bay 14s. There are various glass versions of the Bull's Eye / 12 1/2.

That’s just what’s come up locally. I think we’d jump on a glass version. Really I brought it up to illustrate their aesthetic sensibilities. 
 

Harbor 20 looking good if we can find one. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

The Capri 22 has been used in many rental fleets. I will say that when I traded up to a Hunter 28, i found the bigger boat's easier motion to be a plus. I rented a Capri 18 once and thought it sailed like a submerged log.

Ideal 18s were popular around here; I dont know how frisky they are.

You might be able to find a copy of Capt. Nat's original Alerion. The would be the top of the Herreshoff family that includes the 12 1/2 and the Fish.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

If they want to keep it very simple a cat boat may be an option. They have classic looks in their own way, but not with the long thin proportions considered so far. If you are willing to compromise on looks com-pac has some options.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If mom is getting a bit unsteady, look for something with high initial stability - getting on & off is where the most problems seem to occur in that situation.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, Alan H said:

You know, in the classifieds here on SA there was a custom, outrageously cute daysailor that Bob Perry did for a client.  You might take a look.

Thanks - Might have sold; can’t seem to find it. 

29 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

If mom is getting a bit unsteady, look for something with high initial stability - getting on & off is where the most problems seem to occur in that situation.

A good point. Might push us away from the older skinny stuff. 
 

I continue to be amazed at how tight the market is relative to when I was looking for our boat 9 months ago. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, SemiSalt said:

2020-10-03_13-33-45.png

And there there is the exciting twin-rudder Catalina 22!

2020-10-03_13-37-32.png

I don’t think my parents can handle a twin rudder boat - they’re too fast. 
 

What’s the first one?  Pretty!

Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, socalrider said:

What’s the first one?  Pretty!

Shields Class. S&S design, probably the last racing boats of any popularity with "full keel", i.e. fin keel with attached rudder. I think they race with 4 or 5 aboard. It's got approx 350 sq ft of sail on approx 4500 lbs displacement. 

No engine, of course, and putting an OB one would would be worse vandalism than Bull having an OB on an H-boat.

Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

A cute strip-planked rosinante in Sandy Eggo

 

https://www.boats.com/sailing-boats/1995-herreshoff-rozinante-6688847/

 

We’re going to take a look at that one. Concerned with maintenance requirements though even with the strip plank construction. 
 

Has a seized engine too - great candidate for electric re-power but I have enough projects on my trawler already...

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, socalrider said:

We’re going to take a look at that one. Concerned with maintenance requirements though even with the strip plank construction. 
 

Has a seized engine too - great candidate for electric re-power but I have enough projects on my trawler already...

Yeah, perfect boat for electric. I assume the strip plank is encapsulated in glass. If yes, it’s just another composite boat. Have fun!

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, kinardly said:

Socal, what are the launch options available to your parents? 

No access to a hoist; has to be in a slip realistically. 

1 hour ago, Alaris said:

Harbor 20 sounds spot on perfect. Pretty little things too. 
 

The new Alerion 20 would be even better but wooo... sticker shock: https://sailnorthwest.com/boat/alerion-20/

Yeah I saw the Alerion - nice but not 3x the Schock!  Anyone know sail away price for a new Harbor 20?  Asked but no response yet. 

2 hours ago, Raz'r said:

Yeah, perfect boat for electric. I assume the strip plank is encapsulated in glass. If yes, it’s just another composite boat. Have fun!

Yeah, still lots and lots of bright work though. Worth a look either way. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SeattleEngineer said:

I love the Typhoon, as others have suggested.  But what about the Typhoon Senior?

https://yotlot.com/the-typhoon-senior/

It even says Senior in the name.

A lovely boat, and very affordable.  Put a Torqueedo in the well, and you have a classy boat that can sit on a trailer when not in use, or in a slip ready to go.

Yeah...a friend of mine had a Typhoon Senior on Dillon Reservoir in Colorado. It was wonderful to sail in the mixed up conditions you get at ~8000 ft above sea level with funky wind conditions due to the surrounding big mountains. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

My dad is the same age, has a O'Day 27 in Wisconsin, keeps it on a lake they have a cabin on in the summer.  He still single hands it all the time.  Actual cabin and inboard diesel, trailerable etc.  Seems like a nice boat for SD, would be able to head to Catalina no problem and could store in the off season to cut costs.  Fun safe to double hand.  Not sure what they cost though.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Older you get bigger the boat you need....

That said... they need a Drascombe Lugger....

Webb Chiles did a near circumnavigation in one... as did some bloke from Vancouver in alugger  named 'Triangle Island'.

I have one in my shed... have sailed it in all Australian states except WA and NT... once sailed in 3 states (Vic/NSW/SA) over a long weekend...

Cisco... 74yo...

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, SeattleEngineer said:

I love the Typhoon, as others have suggested.  But what about the Typhoon Senior?

https://yotlot.com/the-typhoon-senior/

It even says Senior in the name.

A lovely boat, and very affordable.  Put a Torqueedo in the well, and you have a classy boat that can sit on a trailer when not in use, or in a slip ready to go.

I wonder if the Senior is a reprise of the Alberg 22 which I was pre-Cape Dory.

The CD 25 and 27 are both attractive.  The 27, when properly decked out, is particularly good-looking, and they sold a lot of them. The CD 28 is a much more modern boat.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m now 77 and sail a 20 foot Sonata solo . 
Bought three years ago as ‘bucket’ boat . A lot will depend on where you sail and how fit you are.

Things to consider are masthead or fractional. With masthead you have a small main to contend with and if the headsail is on a furler little need to go forward although a fractional rig with small self tacker may be preferable for some. You don't want the mainsheet track cutting the cockpit in half to climb over . If you have to go forward climbing up out of the cockpit over the coachroof can be a strain , getting back can be bloody dangerous if you have little to hang on to so something with decent side decks is a plus. Inboard diesel or outboard ? I have transom hung outboard which is convenient for servicing etc. I get son to take to dealer and put back on.
Fixed keel or not. Where I sail there a lots of sandbanks so a swing keel is ideal.More than once I have hit bottom while reefing or whatever and I just raise the keel and sail/motor off and keep sailing. (Keel is on electric winch in cockpit) 
Personally I reckon 22-24 feet with 8 feet beam ideal . My boat with only 24% ballast/ disp. and narrow beam is tippy and heels quickly but then quite stable . 
Hmm perhaps I need another boat for my eighties

 

4ED80774-33EC-4B39-9644-16DA46921964.jpeg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, BBender said:

I’m now 77 and sail a 20 foot Sonata solo . 
Bought three years ago as ‘bucket’ boat . A lot will depend on where you sail and how fit you are.

Things to consider are masthead or fractional. With masthead you have a small main to contend with and if the headsail is on a furler little need to go forward although a fractional rig with small self tacker may be preferable for some. You don't want the mainsheet track cutting the cockpit in half to climb over . If you have to go forward climbing up out of the cockpit over the coachroof can be a strain , getting back can be bloody dangerous if you have little to hang on to so something with decent side decks is a plus. Inboard diesel or outboard ? I have transom hung outboard which is convenient for servicing etc. I get son to take to dealer and put back on.
Fixed keel or not. Where I sail there a lots of sandbanks so a swing keel is ideal.More than once I have hit bottom while reefing or whatever and I just raise the keel and sail/motor off and keep sailing. (Keel is on electric winch in cockpit) 
Personally I reckon 22-24 feet with 8 feet beam ideal . My boat with only 24% ballast/ disp. and narrow beam is tippy and heels quickly but then quite stable . 
Hmm perhaps I need another boat for my eighties

 

4ED80774-33EC-4B39-9644-16DA46921964.jpeg

Good on ya, Bender. I am almost 72, and single-hand my 27' H-Boat - fractional rig, jib furler. Although it has  the dreaded "mainsheet track cutting the cockpit in half to climb over," we have learned to get along.

Tonic_5.thumb.jpg.841a52931ec88944e9b0d5e3dcfb985d.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd suggest a Nonsuch 22. Standing headroom, enclosed head, some built with diesel inboard. No athletics needed for sail handling. 8.5' beam makes it transportable by trailer (not really launch rampable though). When you are 75 you don't really want a cabin you have to crawl around in.

Link to post
Share on other sites

How about the Harbor 29’s big brother the Harbor 25?  Small inboard diesel, head, space to throw some bags, etc.  
 

Would be more stable than some of the smaller boats, which might be good given age of your folks, esp 5 years from now...

Not too bad looking either...

https://www.cruisingworld.com/sailboats/harbor-25/

Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Good on ya, Bender. I am almost 72, and single-hand my 27' H-Boat - fractional rig, jib furler. Although it has  the dreaded "mainsheet track cutting the cockpit in half to climb over," we have learned to get along.

Tonic_5.thumb.jpg.841a52931ec88944e9b0d5e3dcfb985d.jpg

A young’en hey. Thats one very pretty ,functional boat , nice wide side decks.. Never heard of them so had a look on web sites. Classic . Looks to be very stable and pretty slippery thru the water . Your never to old to sail. 
I used to be with a motor cycle club for seniors called ‘Ulysses Club ‘ huge over here and their  motto is ‘grow old disgracefully’ . Not a bad way to go .
 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks all - parents are determining if they want a cabin or not; leaning toward not which honestly I think is the right path for them. Their house is ~10min from the slip, and they’d be doing 1-2hr day sails in the bay for the most part. 
 

As of right now the Harbor 20 sure looks like the right boat.  

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

When I hear "old people sailing", I think about the owner of a boat near me.  He's 88 years old and sometimes singlehands his 38 foot boat.  The only change he has made to the boat for his age is an electric halyard winch.

I'll admit he's an inspiration to me.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, slap said:

I'll admit he's an inspiration to me.

All the old folks out doing what they love in your 70s and 80s are an inspiration!  Hope I am lucky enough to follow suit! 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

We've had at our club over 100 years olds racing their boats, reasonably well too..  It's not unusual to have 8 year olds and 80+ year olds out racing at the same time all in part, using the same course.

 The 8 year olds in toppers or Oppies though occasionally in something bigger. The 80+ plus year olds tend to be in a Yare and Bure One design (AKA the white boat). See below.

During our Regatta week the 8 year olds may well race the boats below in the Juniors in fixed keel races..

2006ybodhorning1.jpg.19104d8daeb6ebfa3d9e197d1a648ea0.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

6 hours ago, slap said:

When I hear "old people sailing", I think about the owner of a boat near me.  He's 88 years old and sometimes singlehands his 38 foot boat.  The only change he has made to the boat for his age is an electric halyard winch.

I'll admit he's an inspiration to me.

My dad is charging up on 74 and loves cruising his J/27 singlehanded, usually crews for me when we doublehand race the J/105, and we have also doublehanded the BI 40 together. I love his energy. Frankly he has more than I do. By the time he’s in his 80s I might give him back the helm but while he’s still jumping at the chance to trim the kite I’m happy to oblige him. He also does all the work on the boats himself or with me. No paid labor for anything except things we can’t do ourselves due to lack of equipment such as replacing rod rigging.

Inspiration, indeed.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Two young friends of mine crewed for an owner in his 90's in his Wednesday night beer can races aboard an Ericson 35 MkII.  This gentleman was a retired Army officer. I still make them re-tell the stories of sailing with this guy because they are so epic.

First of all, his sense of equilibrium was failing as he aged. He would lurch down the dock from piling to piling to the boat while my friends anxiously trailed him, with arms outstretched, prepared to catch him or worse, jump in the water to retrieve him.

Race starts were often filled with such lines as "Bob, do you see this guy coming at us?" to which Bob would peer around the jib, squint and say things like "Is he bigger than us?"

There's more, but you get the gist. I hope I'm like Bob if I reach my 90's.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Alaris said:

Ajax, do you know John Sherwood (former owner of the Metalmast 30 Witch’s Flower)? He must be 90 by now... he has raced with us for decades and is still as sharp as ever. Love racing with him.

Unfortunately, no.  As small as the racing community is, I'm not very up on all the local characters that helped shape our racing scene over the decades. Hell, people in CHESSS have heard of you and your father and were very excited to have you join us.  I've only been sailing since '09 and shit boats in PHRF "Z" at that, so I'd never heard of you.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Back in the 1970s, there was a fellow named Marty at Coconut Grove Sailing Club (Miami) who was in his 90s, and sailed his 25-27 footer very often. His crew always consisted of 2 or 3 attractive women in their 20s who wore skimpy bathing suits. Marty was Scandinavian. I guess they must do things right.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, socalrider said:

Thanks all - parents are determining if they want a cabin or not; leaning toward not which honestly I think is the right path for them. 

That seems sensible to me. My octogenarian father may have similar tastes. He had a Cape Cod Bull's Eye but I think he found it a bit small. Also, he decided that he wanted an auxiliary so he could get home if caught out in the calms.  He's not as spry as he used to be. He uses a cane most of the time. A floating dock with an easy step aboard and no lifelines in the way really helps. We added a pole on the dock that he can steady himself with.

This is his setup:

image.thumb.jpeg.8995270758b2a7b5f390fc241b3c992d.jpeg

 

dock.thumb.jpg.27b8e9b2229a9df91e23e9a189b066f0.jpg

sailing.thumb.jpg.35e25df179301e0640160f01c4d40b7d.jpg

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, weightless said:

That seems sensible to me. My octogenarian father may have similar tastes. He had a Cape Cod Bull's Eye but I think he found it a bit small. Also, he decided that he wanted an auxiliary so he could get home if caught out in the calms.  He's not as spry as he used to be. He uses a cane most of the time. A floating dock with an easy step aboard and no lifelines in the way really helps. We added a pole on the dock that he can steady himself with.

This is his setup:

dock.thumb.jpg.27b8e9b2229a9df91e23e9a189b066f0.jpg

 

Beautiful, what is it? No backstay, so a custom gallows?

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, weightless said:

Ah! A raked rudder post. :o  There is/was a good pissing match about these going on over at the "To Lust Over on YotLot.com" thread. It may rival off-set companionways. Check it out. :P

Sailing a Herreshoff Fish in a blue oxford cloth button down shirt. @weightless your dad is living right! :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Bull City said:

There is/was a good pissing match about these going on over at the "To Lust Over on YotLot.com" thread. It may rival off-set companionways. Check it out. 

I saw that. I would have commented but I had already posted in the anchoring thread and didn't want to get entangled in two religious wars at the same time. :)

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a daysailer for old people, seeing as I'll be retiring shortly, and retiring from solo racing and the incredible money sump that it is. I have a Scottish Piper One Design, but you'll never find one in the USA.

Alternatively, McVey Bluenose 24...

 

img.php?t=1&id=5909158

bluenose-24-5.jpg

 

bluenose-24.jpg

 

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

The 19 foot version of the Bluenose is the Minuet. There's one in Bellingham, WA that I've seen pop up on Craigslist off nd on for  couple of years. It was listed just a couple weeks ago and it's got to be this one.

https://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/69031

Here's a blog about them with lots of pictures....might be a little small for your folks. I'm suspecting they might want to sit more IN the boat, and these seats are pretty small and not deep.

https://mcvayminuet.wordpress.com/

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, Alan H said:

The 19 foot version of the Bluenose is the Minuet. There's one in Bellingham, WA that I've seen pop up on Craigslist off nd on for  couple of years. It was listed just a couple weeks ago and it's got to be this one.

https://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/69031

Here's a blog about them with lots of pictures....might be a little small for your folks. I'm suspecting they might want to sit more IN the boat, and these seats are pretty small and not deep.

https://mcvayminuet.wordpress.com/

 

The Bluenose is glorious!  Minuet does look small. Why do people post ads with just one exterior picture?  

 

13 minutes ago, weightless said:

 On small boats with low topsides it's hard to get both nice seats and a self bailing cockpit.

Yeah, the Harbor 20 seems pretty miraculous in that respect. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

As was mentioned up the thread, the Harbor 25 is also worth a look. Very comfortable, very forgiving, but still a nice sailing little daysailor (with the ability to do some weekending as well). If the Alerion 28 was ticking all of the boxes, I would certainly recommend checking out the Harbor 25.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Rambunctious said:

As was mentioned up the thread, the Harbor 25 is also worth a look. Very comfortable, very forgiving, but still a nice sailing little daysailor (with the ability to do some weekending as well). If the Alerion 28 was ticking all of the boxes, I would certainly recommend checking out the Harbor 25.

 

Plus PHRF ratings give the Harbor 25 J-24 like speed (+/-) depending on area, so that’s not too shabby either...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Crash said:

Plus PHRF ratings give the Harbor 25 J-24 like speed (+/-) depending on area, so that’s not too shabby either...

 

30 minutes ago, Rambunctious said:

As was mentioned up the thread, the Harbor 25 is also worth a look. Very comfortable, very forgiving, but still a nice sailing little daysailor (with the ability to do some weekending as well). If the Alerion 28 was ticking all of the boxes, I would certainly recommend checking out the Harbor 25.

For some reason the Harbor 25 leaves me a bit cold relative to the Alerion 28. Also the ones I’ve seen have wheel steering which seems silly for a boat that size. And they seem over-finished below (marble countertops!). 
 

That said if they want a cabin I’ll steer them toward both. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I looked seriously at the H25 before buying an A28 (you may see me on SD bay).  Both are potentially budget busters for the OP, but they do tick a lot of boxes.  I felt it important to have a big cockpit, an inboard and a proper head (the last two as concessions to advancing years), and that narrows the choices quite a bit.  I felt that the H25 was basically a knockoff of the A28 concept, albeit with a number of details that were better worked out, but the overall impression was much less aesthetically pleasing.  Agree that the wheel steering is overkill.  Haven't regretted my choice so far.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, Son of Hans said:

I looked seriously at the H25 before buying an A28 (you may see me on SD bay).  Both are potentially budget busters for the OP, but they do tick a lot of boxes.  I felt it important to have a big cockpit, an inboard and a proper head (the last two as concessions to advancing years), and that narrows the choices quite a bit.  I felt that the H25 was basically a knockoff of the A28 concept, albeit with a number of details that were better worked out, but the overall impression was much less aesthetically pleasing.  Agree that the wheel steering is overkill.  Haven't regretted my choice so far.

We’re on the same page!  Lovely boat - are you at Kona Kai per chance?  There’s a nice A28 there where we keep our trawler.

A28 was my first thought for them; just not sure if they need the accommodations. My mom never once went below in our First 405. The head is a consideration though. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, socalrider said:

We’re on the same page!  Lovely boat - are you at Kona Kai per chance?  There’s a nice A28 there where we keep our trawler.

A28 was my first thought for them; just not sure if they need the accommodations. My mom never once went below in our First 405. The head is a consideration though. 

No, I'm at Harbor Island West.  There are a couple around - haven't tracked them all down yet!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Helped haul a Capri 26 the other day. I had never seen this model boat before and was surprised how attractive it appeared on the water. I thought it was a very nice looking boat, in more of a modern sense, not in a traditional manner. This boat had an inboard which due to the reverse transom probably makes more sense than an outboard. Enclosed head and minimalist interior are nice touches. Cockpit appeared to be fairly roomy. All in all it took me by surprise. Probably would fit the budget if the non-traditional look isn't a deal breaker.

I'm guessing the performance might be a bit lacking, but for an older couple it might work.

Link to post
Share on other sites

WITCH: a 16' Herreshoff - not sure about that coachroof but the sheer sure is nice.  Fiberglass version of the 12 1/2?  Would love to see a pic of her on the water.  

Looks like a sloop rig.  Pinged the broker for details.  

https://orangecounty.craigslist.org/boa/d/newport-beach-1970-herreshoff/7209285033.html

image.png.07b31ca23b745cc8c01f1fb1d692adc9.png

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, socalrider said:

WITCH: a 16' Herreshoff - not sure about that coachroof but the sheer sure is nice.  Fiberglass version of the 12 1/2?  Would love to see a pic of her on the water.  

Looks like a sloop rig.  Pinged the broker for details.  

https://orangecounty.craigslist.org/boa/d/newport-beach-1970-herreshoff/7209285033.html

image.png.07b31ca23b745cc8c01f1fb1d692adc9.png

Another OCC owned boat, I think.

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, socalrider said:

WITCH: a 16' Herreshoff - not sure about that coachroof but the sheer sure is nice.  Fiberglass version of the 12 1/2?  Would love to see a pic of her on the water.  

Looks like a sloop rig.  Pinged the broker for details.  

https://orangecounty.craigslist.org/boa/d/newport-beach-1970-herreshoff/7209285033.html

image.png.07b31ca23b745cc8c01f1fb1d692adc9.png

Looks in nice shape, and $4900 sounds pretty reasonable to me. Funky gallows, I like.

witch_port_quarter.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot of the success of the 12 1/2 was that it was fairly safe in the wind and wave action of Buzzards Bay, one of the windiest and waveiest areas on the New England coast. This also implies it's underpowered for light airs.

The story was that there were two molds over which Herreshoff built these boats. Cape Cod Shipbuilding got the better one and produced the Bullseye.  The lesser one eventually was used to produce a boat called the Doughdish which copied the appearance of the wooden boats much more exactly. 

Whether the story was true, I don't know.

Link to post
Share on other sites

That might be a little slow in San Diego Bay, socalrider, but you know, it's so damn pretty that it's worth it.  And you can trailer it.  $4900 seems a little steep to me, but you know what.... you'll likely never find another one on this coast.  I'd sure snap that up.

 

If you don't happen to get that one, but Mom and Dad approve, then remember that and keep an eye out for a Cape Dory Typhoon.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites