Jump to content

J/111 2011 questions


Recommended Posts

I'm looking at a 2011 J/111 and I see that there are four different spec sheets for 2011, 2014, 2016 and 2019. I'm comparing them, but for those of you who know this boat well, is there any concern with getting a 2011 as opposed to a newer one? I also saw that at some point the class did away with the furler, but I suspect that would only be an issue with one design racing.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, George Dewey said:

I'm looking at a 2011 J/111 and I see that there are four different spec sheets for 2011, 2014, 2016 and 2019. I'm comparing them, but for those of you who know this boat well, is there any concern with getting a 2011 as opposed to a newer one? I also saw that at some point the class did away with the furler, but I suspect that would only be an issue with one design racing.  

What hull number?  Is it Blast by chance?

Link to post
Share on other sites

From looking at the specs, it seems it ticks all the boxes for Bermuda Race and other offshore races, including a stability index > 115 (I found an ORC cert for one that had an SI of 124.4). Is that correct? I don't mean equipment of course, I mean stuff like tow rails, pulpit design, stanchion/lifeline height, SI and so on. 

From looking at the polars it seems to top out upwind at about 7 kts, and downwind at about 12? 

Are there any particular maintenance quirks or design issues to watch for? 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, George Dewey said:

From looking at the specs, it seems it ticks all the boxes for Bermuda Race and other offshore races, including a stability index > 115 (I found an ORC cert for one that had an SI of 124.4). Is that correct? I don't mean equipment of course, I mean stuff like tow rails, pulpit design, stanchion/lifeline height, SI and so on. 

From looking at the polars it seems to top out upwind at about 7 kts, and downwind at about 12? 

Are there any particular maintenance quirks or design issues to watch for? 

 

Definitely meets the offshore requirements.  Lots of offshore races completed (Fastnet and Middle Sea Race come to mind).  Not sure if a J/111 has raced to Bermuda yet, but they have done Annapolis to Newport, Van Isle 360, Cabo Race.  I believe one did Round Ireland or Round Britain.  British Soldier?

We are looking at the Cat 1 requirements for Pacific Cup and I believe the only thing we've come up with is the need for a manual bilge pump that can be operated from inside the boat.    

Polars - Well, many J/111's have reported speeds over 20 knots, but then the polars only go to 20 knots of wind speed.  7 knots upwind is about right.

Several of the very first hulls from 2011 lost their rudders.  If you are looking at a 2011, you want to know if the boat has already had the rudder replaced.  If not, probably want to be asking more questions to people like J/Boats to determine if this particular boat would have a rudder concern.

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, George Dewey said:

From looking at the specs, it seems it ticks all the boxes for Bermuda Race and other offshore races, including a stability index > 115 (I found an ORC cert for one that had an SI of 124.4). Is that correct? I don't mean equipment of course, I mean stuff like tow rails, pulpit design, stanchion/lifeline height, SI and so on. 

From looking at the polars it seems to top out upwind at about 7 kts, and downwind at about 12? 

Are there any particular maintenance quirks or design issues to watch for?   

Stability shouldn't be an issue. We're at 121.5 (see below). We're also cat 2 (manual bilge pump below + minor mods), but cat 1 should be possible.

Polars: 7.3 upwind in the right conditions. Downwind you're quickly/steadily at 15-18 if the wind is up, but then you have to press on to go faster :D

No big maintenance quirks, besides the rudder mentioned by @Roleur. We had an issue with the mast track not glued properly to the mast for a few meters, but that was a manufacturing glitch by Hall Spars.

We've pushed the boat really hard for >15000 nm and wouldn't hesitate to do any of the big races (except Hobart).

Stability_Datasheet_SWE69-J111.thumb.jpg.8e657cb0dfaa4c76905970f4ef0a33de.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Fantastic info and great news thanks guys! Bermuda does require manual pumps in the cabin and in the cockpit but I suspect those are easy enough to add should i decide to do that. I'll ask about the rudder, thanks for that tip. Fifteen to 20 knots downwind would be amazing, I could adapt to that! I guess that means an A5?

I finally get to see the boat Wednesday. Sadly I don't even get to find out which options she has until then. I see that things I have gotten used to, like a pressurized water system, hot water heater, propane stove, even DC outlets are options!  But if they are options then can probably be added, it's just a matter of time and money. 

How many crew do you guys race with, and how much weight is needed on the rail? Given the SI numbers Blur posted it seems like these are not too tender.

Thanks!!

Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, George Dewey said:

How many crew do you guys race with, and how much weight is needed on the rail? Given the SI numbers Blur posted it seems like these are not too tender.

Fatter is faster :D We typically race w 9 people and rate in ORC w 750 kg. But in longer offshore races we should be fine w 6 or 7. 

With that said, I think it's a great doublehanded boat, and you just have to manage the power upwind or on a beam reach. Downwind you're faster in all conditions. It's a narrow boat, so heel doesn't kill you, but you will struggle against wider boats in some conditions.

Downwind we started out with A2 + A5, and now do A2 (up to 20 knots TWS), max size A3 (20-26 knots) and A5 (26 and above). Many J/111 use an A4 for heavy weather VMG, but we think it's faster to be able to go bow up and work the waves. You're pretty much stuck on TWA 150 otherwise.

BTW, we mounted the second manual bilge pump under the port aft berth with the exit in the steering pedestal. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

WOW!  750kg = 1,653.467 pounds, I'll have to fatten up my crew and add a few new heads. Lots and lots of free cookies and beer for my crew! It's challenging to find crew who are willing to sail if they don't have a job beyond rail meat, but maybe on a rocket like this that will change. Or maybe they will do it for the cookies...

Great info on the sails thanks. Given this is a 2011 is probably comes with a bunch of old sails we can beat up during the first learning season. I figured A2 and A5 would be the go tos, but you're saying you use an A3 downwind? I'll take your advice on that and the A4. I have never owned an asym boat, so I have a lot to learn there.

Thanks again!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Where are you located?  Makes a big difference. We are in the PNW and race almost exclusively double-handed. That’s said the J/111 is not a stiff boat. It is probably the most powered up boat J boats has ever designed. Maybe the J/90?  As a comparison the rig is only 2’ shorter than our previous J/120. Displacement is less than 60% of the 120. 
 Our boat came from SF and came with an A2 and A3. That was for windy SF. We’ve since added a larger A2 and A1.5. 
 

Location makes a big difference. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn’t say the 125 is more powered up, upwind. I suppose the 125 is more tender. Certainly rather race a 111 than a 125 in light air given the ratings. But yes the 125 is definitely up there in the J Boat spectrum. Not sure it matters, but there are 10x as many 111’s as 125’s and 90’s combined. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Roleur said:

Where are you located?  Makes a big difference. We are in the PNW and race almost exclusively double-handed. That’s said the J/111 is not a stiff boat. It is probably the most powered up boat J boats has ever designed. Maybe the J/90?  As a comparison the rig is only 2’ shorter than our previous J/120. Displacement is less than 60% of the 120. 
 Our boat came from SF and came with an A2 and A3. That was for windy SF. We’ve since added a larger A2 and A1.5. 
 

Location makes a big difference. 

I'm in Rhode Island. A search of PHRF-NB showed only one J/111, although i assume there are others with ORC ratings.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Roleur said:

I wouldn’t say the 125 is more powered up, upwind. I suppose the 125 is more tender. Certainly rather race a 111 than a 125 in light air given the ratings. But yes the 125 is definitely up there in the J Boat spectrum. Not sure it matters, but there are 10x as many 111’s as 125’s and 90’s combined. 

Do the 111 have #1’s? The 125 do and they are a huge help in the light stuff. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, IMR said:

Do the 111 have #1’s? The 125 do and they are a huge help in the light stuff. 

Today I was told that there are no sails as big as 155%, that they are 105%. There is a heavy and light version, but they are the same size, just different shape. Its a main driven boat, and I think the intent is to have non-overlapping headsails. Of course there is a code zero available. Class rules limit the competitors to two head sails and two asyms. I could be wrong, I'm sure if I am someone will set me straight.

Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, George Dewey said:

Today I was told that there are no sails as big as 155%, that they are 105%. There is a heavy and light version, but they are the same size, just different shape. Its a main driven boat, and I think the intent is to have non-overlapping headsails. Of course there is a code zero available. Class rules limit the competitors to two head sails and two asyms. I could be wrong, I'm sure if I am someone will set me straight.

Just checked the class rules, so at least for class sails, the head sail max LP is 4.450m while the J is 4.22m. So yup, 105%.

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, George Dewey said:

Today I was told that there are no sails as big as 155%, that they are 105%. There is a heavy and light version, but they are the same size, just different shape. Its a main driven boat, and I think the intent is to have non-overlapping headsails. Of course there is a code zero available. Class rules limit the competitors to two head sails and two asyms. I could be wrong, I'm sure if I am someone will set me straight.

Definitely no overlapping headsails.  That was one of main reasons for changing from a J/120 to a J/111 for us, double-handing mostly.

I probably misjudged the J/125.  It is clearly a super boat, but around here we've seen it struggle to sail to its rating on handicap in light air races.  That may not be a function of how powered up it is as much as it reflects the fast rating it carries due to the offwind potential in more breeze.  FWIW, the rig on a J/111 and J/125 are almost the same height. The 111 sails are just much, much higher aspect than either the J/125 or J/120.  Anyway, my point is the J/111 is pretty powered up, especially compared to most J Boats.  That suggests lots of rail meat, but we've found the boat to go well even over 20 knots with only 4 onboard.  

I should have added the J/111 has no need for an overlapping headsail.  It is fully powered up in 10-11 knots.  It is definitely not a boat that struggles in light air.  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Roleur said:

go well even over 20 knots with only 4 onboard.

Depends. My numbers indicate that you're 2-4% off VMG upwind in 20 knots w just 2 on the rail and ~10% :o off at TWA 100.

Might not matter much on an evening race around the cans, but if you get 24 hours of this on an offshore race it's 10 nm :lol:

Comparable boats will not suffer nearly as much with a lighter crew; First 40, JPK, SunFast 3600, and other wider/IRC-style boats.

<8 knots you will benefit from a lighter crew, Break-even around 10.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I finally got to see the boat today, it looks good but, it has exactly none of the options listed on the spec sheet for a 2011. How difficult would it be to install (1) water heater and pressurized water, (2) DC refrigeration, (3) shore power and (4) propane stove? I would expect that there is space available for the equipment, since they were options, but I'm thinking getting access to where stuff needs to be installed may be an issue.

Thanks!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Access should still be OK, but all your projects are labor intensive & require serious installation. Hot water: run new hot piping thru interior, change out faucets, install tank, connect wiring to AC panel, connect to engine (Fresh) cooling water. Refer: sort out all the various options on how it get's rid of waste heat, install evaporation plate in box, mount compressor, run copper tubing, wire to DC panel. Shorepower: install deck plug, isolation transformer, new AC breaker panel, outlet boxes, run wire to all points. Propane: install vented bottle locker, regulator/gauge/solenoid cluster, run hose to stove area, mount stove, connect hose, install solenoid control, wires, leak test all connections. Pressure water is easy compared to the above: mount pump & accumulator tank, plumb pump into system, run power wiring to panel, plumb foot pumps back to in front of pressure pump so they can still work, leak test system

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, George Dewey said:

I finally got to see the boat today, it looks good but, it has exactly none of the options listed on the spec sheet for a 2011. How difficult would it be to install (1) water heater and pressurized water, (2) DC refrigeration, (3) shore power and (4) propane stove? I would expect that there is space available for the equipment, since they were options, but I'm thinking getting access to where stuff needs to be installed may be an issue.

Thanks!

 

Most J/111's don't have those options.  From your list the only one our boat has is shore power.  My guess is that labor & materials for the items you mentioned would be $10k+

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/13/2020 at 12:44 PM, Roleur said:

Definitely no overlapping headsails.  That was one of main reasons for changing from a J/120 to a J/111 for us, double-handing mostly.

I probably misjudged the J/125.  It is clearly a super boat, but around here we've seen it struggle to sail to its rating on handicap in light air races.  That may not be a function of how powered up it is as much as it reflects the fast rating it carries due to the offwind potential in more breeze.  FWIW, the rig on a J/111 and J/125 are almost the same height. The 111 sails are just much, much higher aspect than either the J/125 or J/120.  Anyway, my point is the J/111 is pretty powered up, especially compared to most J Boats.  That suggests lots of rail meat, but we've found the boat to go well even over 20 knots with only 4 onboard.  

I should have added the J/111 has no need for an overlapping headsail.  It is fully powered up in 10-11 knots.  It is definitely not a boat that struggles in light air.  

J/125 are not excellent in light air. The rigs are pretty stubby vs other -10 to 20 raters and the big genoa doesn't help that much in less than 5 knots. 

However, J125's are unbelievable heavy air boats. They are underrated boats upwind in 15-25 knots, especially sailing fully crewed(9-11 people). 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay thanks again. If I end up with the boat I can probably do some of these things over the winter, I'm pretty handy. I can handle electrical, and I'll probably tackle the refrigerator. The rest can wait, but people like the beer to be cold when we arrive at the dock!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, George Dewey said:

Where do you guys carry the life raft, when it’s required?

We have a 10 person Ultralite in the starboard locker/bench. It can be deployed both up into the cockpit through the hatch or through the saloon if needed. Take some space from the berth, but not much. Also, it's always dry + keep weight forward.

 https://www.oceansafety.com/all-categories/product/ocean-ultralite-canister-option

liferaft-valise-canister_for_datasheet_2

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that’s a raft in a valise and iirc it’s not legal for certain races, I’ll double check. I have a hard side raft and I hate to add 110 pounds to the stern. I could put it on deck forward of the companion way but then it makes it hard for the crew to switch sides.

Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, longy said:

?? as long as the raft itself meets requirements, storage is up to you. They can even be below, as long as they can be got on deck in a specified time.

That’s not the case for OSR Cat 1 races, like going to Hawaii or Bermuda.  Your comment only applies to boats built before 2001.

a rigid container securely stowed on the working deck, in the cockpit or in an open space; or:-
a rigid container or valise securely stowed in a dedicated weather tight locker containing liferaft and abandon ship equipment only which is readily accessible and opens onto the cockpit or working deck, or transom
In a boat with primary launch before June 2001, a liferaft may be packed in a valise not exceeding 40 kg securely stowed below deck adjacent to a companionway

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Roleur said:

a rigid container or valise securely stowed in a dedicated weather tight locker containing liferaft and abandon ship equipment only which is readily accessible and opens onto the cockpit or working deck, or transom

 

The rules are the same for Cat 2 like Fastnet and Middle Sea Race, and our solution has been approved without further questions. The locker is "weathertight" and the area is dedicated to "abandon ship equipment" like the raft and grab-bag. In the discussions we've had with inspectors, it's always been an added benefit that the equipment also can be handled by crew below deck in preparation for abandoning ship.

Alternatively, it's easy to do a soft watertight "bag" inside the locker to hold the raft.

On the J/111 I really like to keep the aft locker empty to be able to check on the rudder/cables/autopilot without removing stuff.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Starboard locker? I just checked my pictures, and I recall that there were lockers in the cockpit but I didn't think they are large enough for a raft. There is an opening at the stern, centered, that gives access to the autopilot ram. So what starboard locker? Is it maybe an option?

Link to post
Share on other sites

On my (Europe built) 111 there is 1 locker underneath the port cockpit bench and 1 underneath the starboard.

The one on port is very shallow (maybe 15cm) and only usable for e.g. storing lines.

The one on starboard basically doesn't contain a bottom.  So when you open it you look straight into the starboard aft bunk.  There you can store your raft (assuming it is small enough to fit through the open bench hatch in the cockpit.

Link to post
Share on other sites

For the starboard locker the boat comes with an insert-box.  This box is about 2-3x as deep as the port locker.  However you need to remove this box when you want the life raft to fit into the starboard locker.  The raft stays directly on the bunk and you can grab it through the cockpit locker or inside the cabin.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, George Dewey said:

Oh I see. The boat I looked at had the same shallow port locker, but the starboard locker was the same as the port. Maybe the bottom can be removed but I understand now. Thank you.

I think this is a difference between US and European built boats.  My US built J/111 is the same as what you describe.  Shallow starboard locker and the bottom is not removable, unless you want to use a sawzall.  

Funny enough on the J/120's it was the opposite.  The European boats had a shallow locker and the US boats had a locker without a bottom.  

We found a 4-person valise that will fit in the aft locker, which is what we will go with.  Otherwise, the only real option is a canister on the cabin top or behind the wheel.  Or, maybe there is an option to mount a canister on a stern rail?  

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Blur said:

 

On the J/111 I really like to keep the aft locker empty to be able to check on the rudder/cables/autopilot without removing stuff.

I wonder if this is another difference between the US and European boats?  We do all of our autopilot, cables, quadrant work by crawling through the openings aft of the quarterberth.  It's tight, but much easier than standing on your head trying to access those things from the cockpit.  Actually, can't reach our autopilot at all from the cockpit lazerette.  Have to go through the quarterberth.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Roleur said:

I wonder if this is another difference between the US and European boats?  We do all of our autopilot, cables, quadrant work by crawling through the openings aft of the quarterberth.  It's tight, but much easier than standing on your head trying to access those things from the cockpit.  Actually, can't reach our autopilot at all from the cockpit lazerette.  Have to go through the quarterberth.  

Tried that once, but had immediate regrets and thought about how long I needed to spend in there without food before I could get out again :o

It might be more a matter of body type than where the boats are built :D

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe all the J/111’s built in the US were built at CCF. A lot of them are now 7-9 years old and I’m not hearing of any construction issues except for some of the early rudder posts. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/19/2020 at 9:33 PM, Roleur said:

I believe all the J/111’s built in the US were built at CCF. A lot of them are now 7-9 years old and I’m not hearing of any construction issues except for some of the early rudder posts. 

Thanks... Is there a way to tell where one was built? Perhaps from the hull number? I'm told this boat was built in France but want to verify, especially since the locker config discussed above seems to match US boats.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, George Dewey said:

Thanks... Is there a way to tell where one was built? Perhaps from the hull number? I'm told this boat was built in France but want to verify, especially since the locker config discussed above seems to match US boats.

Actually i found it, the first three letters of the hull ID do indicate the manufacturer. This boat was built by CCF.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
20 hours ago, George Dewey said:

Regarding the headstay, I'm told that the latest on the furler is that the class did away with it completely. That being the case, where is the headsail tacked? Is there a standard modification?

 

Our boat came from SF Bay where it was raced strictly OD. They left all the furling gear on and just didn’t furl. Not sure if that is common.  Since we don’t race OD, and we race shorthanded, we’ve reactivated the furling (actually replaced the crap Facnor with a Harken).

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Getting back to the rudder... The boat I'm in the process of acquiring is a 2011, which would be considered an "early boat." I see that the rudder issue that happened on the Halifax race was addressed with a technical bulletin in 2014, and a fix can be applied to prior boats. But what about these rudder post breaking issues? That seems unrelated to the post slipping. Was a fix ever issued for that? This boat was made by CCF in RI. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/29/2020 at 10:19 PM, George Dewey said:

Regarding the headstay, I'm told that the latest on the furler is that the class did away with it completely. That being the case, where is the headsail tacked? Is there a standard modification?

 

For jibs that were designed to go on the furler, I have added about an 8 inch strop to the tack fitting to fly the jibs from so the tack height replicates the furler tack location as the jib was designed to be flown off the deck that much.  If you don't add the strop, the jib is pressed against the deck and cabin top when closehauled with in-hauler on. Newer jibs are designed to be flown from the tack fitting on the deck.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, Donkey687 said:

Newer jibs are designed to be flown from the tack fitting on the deck.

 

And that would be a substantial advantage. The sail would be bigger, and there will be an end cap effect. It seems that change effectively rendered all the furling sails obsolete, at least for anyone who wanted to be competitive in one design. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, George Dewey said:

And that would be a substantial advantage. The sail would be bigger, and there will be an end cap effect. It seems that change effectively rendered all the furling sails obsolete, at least for anyone who wanted to be competitive in one design. 

The sails are the same size as they are subject to the class rules design limitations.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/1/2020 at 11:16 AM, Donkey687 said:

For jibs that were designed to go on the furler, I have added about an 8 inch strop to the tack fitting to fly the jibs from so the tack height replicates the furler tack location as the jib was designed to be flown off the deck that much.  If you don't add the strop, the jib is pressed against the deck and cabin top when closehauled with in-hauler on. Newer jibs are designed to be flown from the tack fitting on the deck.

 

 

I would add for multiple furler cut jibs that it's a good idea to leave a strop on each sail.  It sounds crazy, but different furler cut jibs need different length stops.  Intuition says that that strops should all be the same length if the jib is cut from the same furler.  It didn't exactly pan out that way when Freedom ditched the furler.  On some sails the strop is almost twice the length.

 

The other good reason to have one on each sail is you won't loose it and you'll not be up on the bow wondering which one needs to go with the sail that you're using.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...
2 hours ago, LI_sailor said:

Congrats!  We bought a J/111 in Western Long Island sound over the summer; an early model as well - no problems so far. Hope to see you out there!

Great, congrats to you too! So there is you in LI, Wicked 2.0 in New Bedford, 19th Nervous Breakdown in CT and me in RI and Fireball somewhere. So far Wicked and Fireball are entered in BIRW. I know Fireball does well. 

Which big races are you considering? I'm not sure if we can get a start at Cedar Point One Design, but if so we'll be there. Also planning Ida Lewis, Vineyard and if I can pull it off, Halifax.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, George Dewey said:

Great, congrats to you too! So there is you in LI, Wicked 2.0 in New Bedford, 19th Nervous Breakdown in CT and me in RI and Fireball somewhere. So far Wicked and Fireball are entered in BIRW. I know Fireball does well. 

Which big races are you considering? I'm not sure if we can get a start at Cedar Point One Design, but if so we'll be there. Also planning Ida Lewis, Vineyard and if I can pull it off, Halifax.  

Add in "The Roost" in Greenwich, Libertas and Varuna in Southport, Black Diamond at KP, Bravo out on Shelter Island, and Wild Child in Stamford and you theoretically have 11 in the area.


CPYC will definitely give you a start if you can pull 5-6 together.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

We had the survey today, and all was good except one concern. It seems water is leaking from the bilge down the side of the keel. The surveyor suspects that the bedding is leaking and points out that if water can get out, it can get in. Things were frozen here today so, in the pics, you can see the icicles that formed under the keel joint.

The surveyor says the keel bolts should be loosened, the hull liften just a bit, while the joint is cleaned and rebedded. I'll bet that all sure sounds much easier than it is, especially if the bedding is 5200. 

Anyone here experienced this problem and, if so, what was the cure?

Thanks!

 

IMG_2058.JPG

IMG_2059.JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would definitely get a second opinion.

How long has the boat been out of the water?  The keel is inserted into a socket in the bottom of the hull.  So it is natural that water drips out of the socket down the keel.  Then if the gap where the keel inserts into the socket has been filled with something like silicone or whatever, it will hold the water up in the socket longer.  

If the boat was just hauled recently for this survey, then it is completely normal.

Link to post
Share on other sites

That's not an issue. All boats have this. The keel is recessed, and by design, there's a gap between the "filler plates" and the keel that you fill with Sika to stop turbulence. Some of us fill the volume behind with foam, but it always collects water that keeps draining throughout the winter.

For a thorough inspection, you need to remove the plates and redo the work. But I wouldn't worry.

coverplates.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Roleur said:

I would definitely get a second opinion.

How long has the boat been out of the water?  The keel is inserted into a socket in the bottom of the hull.  So it is natural that water drips out of the socket down the keel.  Then if the gap where the keel inserts into the socket has been filled with something like silicone or whatever, it will hold the water up in the socket longer.  

If the boat was just hauled recently for this survey, then it is completely normal.

About two weeks. Thanks gentlemen, I feel much better about this. The boat otherwise is in great shape, with dry core everywhere. There is one forwarded stanchion that may be leaking and that’s all that was found. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

How bad would it be to add 4.25oz at the masthead? I'm considering a combination anchor / tri-color light, to get more visibility offshore. I have checked several and the one from Marine Beam seems to be the lightest. And of course there is the wire as well, but it would be very light wire since this device uses very little power and can tolerate the voltage drop.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/9/2020 at 9:21 PM, George Dewey said:

We had the survey today, and all was good except one concern. It seems water is leaking from the bilge down the side of the keel. The surveyor suspects that the bedding is leaking and points out that if water can get out, it can get in. Things were frozen here today so, in the pics, you can see the icicles that formed under the keel joint.

The surveyor says the keel bolts should be loosened, the hull liften just a bit, while the joint is cleaned and rebedded. I'll bet that all sure sounds much easier than it is, especially if the bedding is 5200. 

Anyone here experienced this problem and, if so, what was the cure?

Thanks!

 

IMG_2058.JPG

IMG_2059.JPG

I had a problem with the keel leaking when I first got the boat.  Fix is to drop the keel and rebed.  No problems since.  Since I got it taken care of early, JBoats covered the repair.  Only other problem I had was one of the deck organizers was put on without caulking.  

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, Goblew said:

I had a problem with the keel leaking when I first got the boat.  Fix is to drop the keel and rebed.  No problems since.  Since I got it taken care of early, JBoats covered the repair.  Only other problem I had was one of the deck organizers was put on without caulking.  

 

How hard a job was it?

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, George Dewey said:

How hard a job was it?

Not exactly sure how much time it took.  The dealer I bought the boat from did the repair.  Seemed pretty routine.  I think hardest part was refairing the cover plates once reinstalled.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...