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My season just ended, and...


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I miss it terribly. Already. I feel...a little bit of despair, without my boat until spring. 

Ok, there is the expected first grandchild, but good lord, why can't Maine Summer's last 12 months a year?

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here in the East Anglia I keep my boat in commission all year round

certainly the weather often sucks and there are plenty of 6 layer days

but two or three times a month through the winter we get a ridge come through between depressions or, even better, a high settles in.

Then we get bright sunny, light wind but nut crunchingly cold days (by that I mean hovering around 0 C not 0 F).  The light is fantastic and the river is full of migrating birds. The mooring fields are generally empty so I can beat from one end of the 10 mile estuary to the other without engangering the gel coats of  £50,000 scoop sterns.

I like to spend a few days each winter up the adjacent estuary systems - the alde ore and butley to the north, the stour, backwaters, Blackwater and Colne to the south.

Granted the nights are a bit long - lasting from 4.30 in the afternoon  until 8 the next morning - but the sun is low all day and the colours are fantastic. The acoustic is a delight.

At the age of 65,  I confess that I have never sailed in warm water - I am now worried that should I go to the BVIs or the med I might suddenly realise that I have squandered six decades of sailing time sloshing around cold British water. Ignorance can be bliss.

 me old dad often said, "count your blessings and forget your woes". He said watching a wake dissipate behind a boat is good for the soul.

I now have a ugly tank of a  boat with a heated sentry box on it, a Taylor stove, good mobile internet and 100 books on the Kindle - this is going to be a good winter....never warm, often not dry.

But it is going to be a cracker.

D

 

 

 

 

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I too sail all year round, not down in Secret waters, but up here in the Coot club about 50- 60 miles north of you.

A Late  ex commodore of the summer club https://horning-sailing.club/ went down to sail permanently in your area, sadly he died comparatively young.

Our winter sailing club https://www.sfsc.co.uk/pages/ has just started it's season last Sunday, with the big Tri-Icycle race next Sunday, and the Yeoman Nationals the weekend after that.

it really can be beautiful, out sailing over the winter, few grockles and few locals out to disturb the wildlife. drifting along near sunrise or sunset is always a favourite..

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30 minutes ago, The Q said:

I too sail all year round, not down in Secret waters, but up here in the Coot club about 50- 60 miles north of you.

A Late  ex commodore of the summer club https://horning-sailing.club/ went down to sail permanently in your area, sadly he died comparatively young.

Our winter sailing club https://www.sfsc.co.uk/pages/ has just started it's season last Sunday, with the big Tri-Icycle race next Sunday, and the Yeoman Nationals the weekend after that.

it really can be beautiful, out sailing over the winter, few grockles and few locals out to disturb the wildlife. drifting along near sunrise or sunset is always a favourite..

I kept a 15 foot 6 inch trailer sailer at Horning for two winters on a side dyke loaned to me by a wooden boat owner.  I would go up there during a winter high.  I reckoned I could do three days and two nights before condensation turned everything inside the candle heated full crouching headroom micro cabin to damp mush.

I soon learned that I was better off without any berth cushions at all and used a lilo for sleeping on.

The nights were a challenge but on the broads you can always step ashore and go for a brisk walk to thaw out the extremities.

I saw my first ever wild otter and my first spoonbill.

Wind was often in short supply but I had  a small honda and a long sweep - no grockles, no mobos...... delightful

D

PS - again and again I have tried to enjoy the writings of the mouse breeding double dealing, philandering  spy but I always found  the "let's pretend" bollix about witches, pirates, smugglers  etc too hard to stomach.  By the time I was the right age to read it I was already racing dinghies. I had three older sailing brothers who were more real heroes than Titty and George ever could be.

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@dylan winter to whom are you referring? I’m not that familiar with your British authors. Len Deighton?

It’s an interesting CV, whoever it is, especially the mouse-breeding bit.

For some reason, Smiley comes to mind, and Richard Burton in Berlin, black and white.

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4 minutes ago, Black Sox said:

@dylan winter to whom are you referring? I’m not that familiar with your British authors. Len Deighton?

It’s an interesting CV, whoever it is, especially the mouse-breeding bit.

For some reason, Smiley comes to mind, and Richard Burton in Berlin, black and white.

as an elderly English sailor I am supposed to idolise him and his works

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Ransome

he was, at best, the JK Rowling of his age, at worst he was little better than Enid Blyton

 

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17 minutes ago, savoir said:

Grockles ?

the ones on the broads are particularly irksome to sailors as they have rented 35 foot mobos, wear pretend captain's hats and spend their lunchtimes in pubs.

 

their post lunchtime jaunt down the dykes can be a fairly entertaining to watch as  long as it is not your boat in the firing line.

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2 hours ago, dylan winter said:

I now have a ugly tank of a  boat with a heated sentry box on it, a Taylor stove, good mobile internet and 100 books on the Kindle - this is going to be a good winter....never warm, often not dry.

Doesn't sound like you are bonding with the new craft?

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14 minutes ago, astro said:

Doesn't sound like you are bonding with the new craft?

You are missing the tone of respect for a tool (the Whale) that is, perhaps, inelegant but highly functional and well suited to the task in hand... keeping the cold and damp outside, while Dylan is warm and dry inside.

Cheers,

               W.

Edited by WGWarburton
stray comma
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1 hour ago, dylan winter said:

the ones on the broads are particularly irksome to sailors as they have rented 35 foot mobos, wear pretend captain's hats and spend their lunchtimes in pubs.

 

their post lunchtime jaunt down the dykes can be a fairly entertaining to watch as  long as it is not your boat in the firing line.

Nautical muggles

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12 minutes ago, astro said:

Doesn't sound like you are bonding with the new craft?

I am a serial boat owner and not the sort to anthropomorphise over machines made of extruded aluminium and conjealed snot.

I have even heard of people who talk to,  pat or occasionally  kiss their boat goodbye when leaving it.

I admit that the Hunter minstrel is a wonderful sailing machine. When she is set up on a course and I am standing in the hatchway chest deep in my own boat then it sometimes feels as though I am almost wearing it.

The whale is a different kettle of fish

although

There is also a certain determined satisfaction to being on the whale while she is chunking her determined way  through a north sea slop. 

I am always sad when I sell a boat - not in the way I did when II had my last horse put down. The boat takes memories, past pleasures and adventures with her..... but she sheds those with her new owners.

I am keeping the Hunter Minstrel, she is cominng onto the drive for a snails pace deep level re-furb.  I intend on sailing the fisher for a decade until either my fitness or money runs out and then selling her.

I will then end my sailing days consuming whisky, black coffee and egg banjos on the east coast riivers sailing the Minstrel through the shallow waters of my native area

Then I will park her in front of the house again so that every time I hobble out the front door she will be there to remind me that I was once a sailor.

D

 

 

 

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16 minutes ago, dylan winter said:

Then I will park her in front of the house again so that every time I hobble out the front door she will be there to remind me that I was once a sailor.

We are all, always sailors, even on land.

I was outdoors with a group of people having a BBQ.  The humidity changed slightly, something in the air, I looked around and said "you know, I think we might get a storm this arvo."

No one else thought there was a problem, but that sense we develop to detect changes, predict what is going to happen because we have seen it before.  The imperceptible becoming perceptible, the little hairs on your ears telling you stuff.  The minute change in wind direction and temperature that others don't even notice.

Anyway, sub tropical Australian storms start out of nowhere and can really hurt you, and your car.  I felt it before there was anything to see, like a scared dog hears the thunder before you do.  Skills accumulated from days of scanning the horizon for a change, or studying the pattern on the water for a puff or shift.

Sailors can see these things, it never leaves you, even when you hobble out the front door.

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Thank you Dylan for the ongoing sailing plan. Bit teary after that.

Don't do it again. I am trying to enjoy the here and now.

Glad you're filled once again with the sailing life.

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To quote the old saying, to be recited in a deep down east accent ,  “If yah can’t stand the Wintah, ya doan deserve the Summer”. At least someone teased me with that as I complained about the Winter. 
 

 Len Deighton? I’ve always loved his non-fiction history. . 

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9 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I miss it terribly. Already. I feel...a little bit of despair, without my boat until spring. 

Ok, there is the expected first grandchild, but good lord, why can't Maine Summer's last 12 months a year?

You could be wintering over in the Bahamas or Caribbean, a man of your means.  Quit faffing about in Taos in all that powder.

You could be enjoying your wife in a bikini instead of peeling off her layers like an onion.

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3 hours ago, Black Sox said:

And are Grockles tourists?

Grockles is a west country term for tourists, it's believe to have been started following the antics of a 1920s children's book character , a dragon, who wandered about causing trouble without realising it was were doing it..

The Other term from the Arthur Ransome books, used on the broads is "Hullaballoos" generally used for drunken LOUD tourists who cause navigational chaos.

Those hiring a motor boat are lucky if they get 1/2 hours training, they mostly don't bother reading the manuals supplied nor these days watch the online Videos . And the chances of them having read the Navigational regulations are nil  (mind you there are many motorboat owners who've never read them either.)

Over the years I've seen them run into river banks on a straight bit of river.

Get lost when you can only go up or down river.

Abandon the helm to the girlfriend, an say you take over, I'm going to the toilet.. she stood there shouting what to I do.. about which time they ran into a moored boat at 90 degrees splitting it from the cabin roof to below the water line.

Some drunken hullabloos playing pass the parcel with the lit mini gas cooker they unhooked from it's mounting..

Instant barbeques on the gas locker is a favourite and the common one taking boats through bridged that are too short..

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We've met couples who ship there boats south for the winter then back East at seasons end.  The boats are shipped with the rigs standing. There are some nice marinas in St Martin and St Bart's.

Or you can sail south if you have the time.

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9 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I miss it terribly. Already. I feel...a little bit of despair, without my boat until spring. 

Ok, there is the expected first grandchild, but good lord, why can't Maine Summer's last 12 months a year?

Grandchild!!! Congratulations.

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5 hours ago, The Q said:

I too sail all year round, not down in Secret waters, but up here in the Coot club about 50- 60 miles north of you.

My little sis and I loved Swallows and Amazons. My parents started reading them to us when I was probably 6 or 7, and they became our inspiration for adventures on land and water near the 'other Norfolk' in the late '60s. My sister admitted recently that she had re-read the series just a couple of years ago. And last month in the attic I discovered the tri-cornered hat she used to wear while we voyaged in our dinghy with sail and oars.

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3 hours ago, dylan winter said:

I am a serial boat owner and not the sort to anthropomorphise over machines made of extruded aluminium and conjealed snot.

I have even heard of people who talk to,  pat or occasionally  kiss their boat goodbye when leaving it.

I admit that the Hunter minstrel is a wonderful sailing machine. When she is set up on a course and I am standing in the hatchway chest deep in my own boat then it sometimes feels as though I am almost wearing it.

The whale is a different kettle of fish

although

There is also a certain determined satisfaction to being on the whale while she is chunking her determined way  through a north sea slop. 

I am always sad when I sell a boat - not in the way I did when II had my last horse put down. The boat takes memories, past pleasures and adventures with her..... but she sheds those with her new owners.

I am keeping the Hunter Minstrel, she is cominng onto the drive for a snails pace deep level re-furb.  I intend on sailing the fisher for a decade until either my fitness or money runs out and then selling her.

I will then end my sailing days consuming whisky, black coffee and egg banjos on the east coast riivers sailing the Minstrel through the shallow waters of my native area

Then I will park her in front of the house again so that every time I hobble out the front door she will be there to remind me that I was once a sailor.

D

 

 

 

Poetry. Thank you.

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52 minutes ago, Israel Hands said:

My little sis and I loved Swallows and Amazons. My parents started reading them to us when I was probably 6 or 7, and they became our inspiration for adventures on land and water near the 'other Norfolk' in the late '60s. My sister admitted recently that she had re-read the series just a couple of years ago. And last month in the attic I discovered the tri-cornered hat she used to wear while we voyaged in our dinghy with sail and oars.

S&A are responsible for a great many taking up sailing, and  in my case the books the Coot Club and Big six are responsible for me moving to Norfolk.

When you complete your trade training in the RAF, you put in a choice of three places you'd like to be posted to.. which  you don't normally get.. However since I'd never been to Norfolk except in the books, I put in for it and strangely I got it...

 After spending about 5 years posted here, I liked it and in particular the challenges of sailing here. So when I left the RAF and with my family spread around the country, so not having an affiliation to one place, I tried to move back here, it took 11 years.

We have several Club members who can no longer sail, they still come down and sit out the front in the sun having a coffee and a Bacon roll (or eggy banjo). But the advantage of our waters, if you can get on a boat even with help.. you can still sail..

 

The sailing club at Horning, just 100 yards from the staithe mentioned in the books..

Horning_Sailing_Club.jpg

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4 hours ago, dylan winter said:

Then I will park her in front of the house again so that every time I hobble out the front door she will be there to remind me that I was once a sailor.

D

 

I speak from experience that having an ocean-going sailboat parked in your front yard is absolutely brutal.  For eight years, doing a big refit on and off (including engine removal and rebuild).  Many friends fearer for my welfare, fearing the boat would never leave our front yard.  It sat there as a daily reminder —and stern motivation every time I walked by.

Best to have a small boat in the water when older, and none in the yard as a brutal reminder...

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6 hours ago, dylan winter said:

at worst he was little better than Enid Blyton

I recall reading a huge number of Enid Blyton books as a child. 

These were stories of empowered youth who did things like take 'summer hols', carried around 'torches' and put their luggage in the 'boot' of the car.  One of them played the 'zither'. As a Canadian kid growing up, this was my window into a world beyond my dreary suburban existence.  It also taught me how to use a dictionary to look up all these words.  

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5 hours ago, dylan winter said:

I am a serial boat owner and not the sort to anthropomorphise over machines made of extruded aluminium and conjealed snot.

I have even heard of people who talk to,  pat or occasionally  kiss their boat goodbye when leaving it.

I admit that the Hunter minstrel is a wonderful sailing machine. When she is set up on a course and I am standing in the hatchway chest deep in my own boat then it sometimes feels as though I am almost wearing it.

The whale is a different kettle of fish

although

There is also a certain determined satisfaction to being on the whale while she is chunking her determined way  through a north sea slop. 

I am always sad when I sell a boat - not in the way I did when II had my last horse put down. The boat takes memories, past pleasures and adventures with her..... but she sheds those with her new owners.

I am keeping the Hunter Minstrel, she is cominng onto the drive for a snails pace deep level re-furb.  I intend on sailing the fisher for a decade until either my fitness or money runs out and then selling her.

I will then end my sailing days consuming whisky, black coffee and egg banjos on the east coast riivers sailing the Minstrel through the shallow waters of my native area

Then I will park her in front of the house again so that every time I hobble out the front door she will be there to remind me that I was once a sailor.

D

 

 

 

sounds like a plan!

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3 hours ago, Ajax said:

You could be wintering over in the Bahamas or Caribbean, a man of your means.  Quit faffing about in Taos in all that powder.

You could be enjoying your wife in a bikini instead of peeling off her layers like an onion.

Oh dear. At our ages, both eligible for SS and Medicare, the surest means of snuffing those lusty feeling is nudity. We know the dark is on our side, and light is what we fear. 

 

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Just now, Cruisin Loser said:

Oh dear. At our ages, both eligible for SS and Medicare, the surest means of snuffing those lusty feeling is nudity. We know the dark is on our side, and light is what we fear. 

 

LOL...you need to adopt the European attitude. It seems like every nude beach I've ever visited was full of corpulent elderly Germans and never was a fit, young woman in sight. Apparently once you reach a certain age, you just say "F-- it."  The attractive young people who should be the least concerned, were the most reticent and kept their clothes on. It was pretty amusing.

For the record, I did not end up at these beaches intentionally seeking nudity or tanning.  I was an unwitting victim.  What has been seen, cannot be unseen!

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5 hours ago, dylan winter said:

Then I will park her in front of the house again so that every time I hobble out the front door she will be there to remind me that I was once a sailor.

D

It's been 7 years now since I've climbed a 5.12 outdoors, and 5 since I've climbed anything on a rope. Yet one room of our home is still owned by the indoor climbing wall. I get on it occasionally with good intent, then realize how hard even the starting moves are with a 45 deg overhang. 

So now it, along with the old rugby jerseys folded on a shelf in a cedar closet,  just reminds me that, once upon a long time ago, I was a hard man.  

When my days with Restive end, she will not become a yard trophy. As her original owner did, I will find someone younger possessed by the disease, someone who wants a boat of aching beauty that sails like nothing else, and find a way to get her into this lucky person's hands. 

 

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5 hours ago, Elegua said:

To quote the old saying, to be recited in a deep down east accent ,  “If yah can’t stand the Wintah, ya doan deserve the Summer”. At least someone teased me with that as I complained about the Winter. 
 

 Len Deighton? I’ve always loved his non-fiction history. . 

In my opinion, his fiction is slightly better than his history, which could often be labeled 'historical fiction'.  

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30 minutes ago, Ajax said:

LOL...you need to adopt the European attitude. It seems like every nude beach I've ever visited was full of corpulent elderly Germans and never was a fit, young woman in sight. Apparently once you reach a certain age, you just say "F-- it."  The attractive young people who should be the least concerned, were the most reticent and kept their clothes on. It was pretty amusing.

For the record, I did not end up at these beaches intentionally seeking nudity or tanning.  I was an unwitting victim.  What has been seen, cannot be unseen!

uhhuh, sure.

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2 minutes ago, Ed Lada said:

In my opinion, his fiction is slightly better than his history, which could often be labeled 'historical fiction'.  

Some of it isn't so accurate in the way of AJP Taylor. His take on the Battle of Britain is decent - Dowding got screwed. I love the series of photos captioned "Conversations I'd Love to Have Overheard". 

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15 minutes ago, chester said:

uhhuh, sure.

LOL...ok, here's the boring story:

My submarine had just completed 45 days submerged in the Caribbean.

Our skipper wrangled us a port call in Curacao. The places we were allowed to visit were somewhat limited. The main place we hung out was this hotel with a little casino that allowed nude sunbathing.  Now imagine 117 horny sailors that have been locked up in a dark tube for 45 days getting wind of that. Curacao is a Dutch protectorate. Most of the crew had visions of tall, tan, Aryan looking women sunning themselves.

Before we were let loose, the Chief of the Boat warned us that anyone caught staring or causing trouble would kill the liberty scheme for the entire crew. Imagine their disappointment when they got down to the beach and only found a bunch of European pensioners.

I grew up on SW Florida. As kids, we called it "Land of the newlywed and nearly-dead" due to the weird demographic gap in the people who lived there. Lots of retirees.  There was a nude beach in the area and there was a big hullaballoo in the news about the retirees fighting *for* it.  When I went to the hotel in Curacao, I knew what we'd find and I laughed when I heard the crew grumbling about the lack of hotties.

There actually *were* tall, tan, blonde and young Dutch women everywhere. Like clones! They worked the hotels, bars and the casino. They were gorgeous. They were also rude as fuck and totally dismissive of us.  After enduring rude service at one of the bars, I spent the next few days snorkeling with dolphins down at the beach instead of wasting my time on them.

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Geez - that's depressing!  And I've been saying how great it was, back in the 60s and 70s, to have experienced all of the freewheeling nudity that went on. From the mountains to the coasts, on beaches and boats. Those were the days!

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7 hours ago, astro said:

We are all, always sailors, even on land.

I was outdoors with a group of people having a BBQ.  The humidity changed slightly, something in the air, I looked around and said "you know, I think we might get a storm this arvo."

No one else thought there was a problem, but that sense we develop to detect changes, predict what is going to happen because we have seen it before.  The imperceptible becoming perceptible, the little hairs on your ears telling you stuff.  The minute change in wind direction and temperature that others don't even notice.

Anyway, sub tropical Australian storms start out of nowhere and can really hurt you, and your car.  I felt it before there was anything to see, like a scared dog hears the thunder before you do.  Skills accumulated from days of scanning the horizon for a change, or studying the pattern on the water for a puff or shift.

Sailors can see these things, it never leaves you, even when you hobble out the front door.

If you haven't seen it, check out "The Big Country". A sea captain finds himself in the old west...

 

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1 hour ago, Cruisin Loser said:

It's been 7 years now since I've climbed a 5.12 outdoors, and 5 since I've climbed anything on a rope. Yet one room of our home is still owned by the indoor climbing wall. I get on it occasionally with good intent, then realize how hard even the starting moves are with a 45 deg overhang. 

So now it, along with the old rugby jerseys folded on a shelf in a cedar closet,  just reminds me that, once upon a long time ago, I was a hard man.  

When my days with Restive end, she will not become a yard trophy. As her original owner did, I will find someone younger possessed by the disease, someone who wants a boat of aching beauty that sails like nothing else, and find a way to get her into this lucky person's hands. 

 

For some reason this hit me harder than it should have. My new bride and I are on the other side of the coin. 30 and 26, wrenching on our boat, cruising as much as we can, and working our butts off (me finance, her healthcare) to gain comfortable financial independence. We / I need to get better at taking a breath and enjoying where we are for a bit. Easy to keep looking forward and dreaming without taking advantage of today. 

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

LOL...you need to adopt the European attitude. It seems like every nude beach I've ever visited was full of corpulent elderly Germans and never was a fit, young woman in sight. Apparently once you reach a certain age, you just say "F-- it."  The attractive young people who should be the least concerned, were the most reticent and kept their clothes on. It was pretty amusing.

For the record, I did not end up at these beaches intentionally seeking nudity or tanning.  I was an unwitting victim.  What has been seen, cannot be unseen!

Yeah, right.

You forgot to add,

”Your Honour.”

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42 minutes ago, Ajax said:

 

There actually *were* tall, tan, blonde and young Dutch women everywhere. Like clones! They worked the hotels, bars and the casino. They were gorgeous. They were also rude as fuck and totally dismissive of us.  After enduring rude service at one of the bars, I spent the next few days snorkeling with dolphins down at the beach instead of wasting my time on them.

The thing about Curaçao is that the bitchy hot blonde Dutch chicks are only window dressing for the friendly hot Venezuelan and Colombian women lucky enough to vacation a stone’s throw from home.  

I thought that was common knowledge.

 

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16 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I miss it terribly. Already. I feel...a little bit of despair, without my boat until spring. 

Ok, there is the expected first grandchild, but good lord, why can't Maine Summer's last 12 months a year?

There's sailing in other places than Maine.

You need something relatively small & simple & fun that you can keep & sail closer to home, like a VX-1 or something. Or maybe a new guitar.....

 

1 hour ago, ghost37 said:

For some reason this hit me harder than it should have. My new bride and I are on the other side of the coin. 30 and 26, wrenching on our boat, cruising as much as we can, and working our butts off (me finance, her healthcare) to gain comfortable financial independence. We / I need to get better at taking a breath and enjoying where we are for a bit. Easy to keep looking forward and dreaming without taking advantage of today. 

Financial independence is a worth while goal, and one way to achieve it is to need very very little. Go camp-cruising on a Sunfish and save up your capital. That way you'll -also- have some really choice adventures to savor!

FB- Doug

 

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Just now, Steam Flyer said:

There's sailing in other places than Maine.

You need something relatively small & simple & fun that you can keep & sail closer to home, like a VX-1 or something. Or maybe a new guitar.....

FB- Doug

 

I had a 16' Boston Whaler sailboat here, but the lakes are so low and far away that I gave it away for a small donation to the HS Robotics team.

As to guitars, we jammed at the house the other night (we'll play tonight as well) and I snapped a picture of the aftermath. There are more upstairs, more in a storage room. Not sure another guitar is really what I need, but my wife, I'm sure, appreciates the suggestion.:rolleyes:

IMG_1590.thumb.jpg.7662415df22b802616418074c5b3486b.jpg

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More guitars, Southpaw!

I just traded a Peavey 6505 head and Marshall 1936 amp to a friend who called me a couple of weeks ago to trade for his 1979 Gibson Les Paul Custom “second”. Hadn’t spoken to him in a few years. He reached out when Eddie Van Halen died and he wanted to use his Kramer guitars through my rig because it was so powerful and yet subtle. I work with a number of players to make their music available and haven’t used the amp since I moved aboard back in June...

The SG lefty has a good home with a guy who can play it to an audience when the time comes 

11E74882-F1BE-4970-A46E-C1251B1382BB.jpeg

77AEA8C1-166D-465A-A8E2-294692EB99CE.jpeg

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2 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I had a 16' Boston Whaler sailboat here, but the lakes are so low and far away that I gave it away for a small donation to the HS Robotics team.

As to guitars, we jammed at the house the other night (we'll play tonight as well) and I snapped a picture of the aftermath. There are more upstairs, more in a storage room. Not sure another guitar is really what I need, but my wife, I'm sure, appreciates the suggestion.:rolleyes:

IMG_1590.thumb.jpg.7662415df22b802616418074c5b3486b.jpg

If you sent me that Eames chair, you'd have room for at least four more guitars...

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10 minutes ago, IStream said:

If you sent me that Eames chair, you'd have room for at least four more guitars...

Dammit, I was going to say if he sent me four guitars he'd have room for another chair.

Unfortunately, they are all lefties.

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6 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

It's been 7 years now since I've climbed a 5.12 outdoors, and 5 since I've climbed anything on a rope. Yet one room of our home is still owned by the indoor climbing wall. I get on it occasionally with good intent, then realize how hard even the starting moves are with a 45 deg overhang. 

So now it, along with the old rugby jerseys folded on a shelf in a cedar closet,  just reminds me that, once upon a long time ago, I was a hard man.  

When my days with Restive end, she will not become a yard trophy. As her original owner did, I will find someone younger possessed by the disease, someone who wants a boat of aching beauty that sails like nothing else, and find a way to get her into this lucky person's hands. 

 

Cruisin', sounds like this little grandchild is coming just in time.

My oldest is 11. I mentioned some where on CA that when she and her little sister came to visit us couple of months ago, she specifically wanted to go sailing. I like to surf, and last Christmas, I decided she was ready for a surfboard, and her dad (my #2 son and a surfer) agreed,  so I sported for one. She loves it. 

Please keep me posted.

B.C.

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1 minute ago, Bull City said:

Cruisin', sounds like this little grandchild is coming just in time.

My oldest is 11. I mentioned some where on CA that when she and her little sister came to visit us couple of months ago, she specifically wanted to go sailing. I like to surf, and last Christmas, I decided she was ready for a surfboard, and her dad (my #2 son and a surfer) agreed,  so I sported for one. She loves it. 

Please keep me posted.

B.C.

Yeah, Mrs. Loser has been at the kids place in Austin watching the Animal Farm while the kids vacation at our home in Taos, for the last couple of weeks. She is already feathering their nest, she hopes to be done with some minor remodeling when they get home, to surprise them. She's done this before, with welcome results. 

Our daughter has had a tough time with the pregnancy until recently. She's had severe rheumatoid arthritis since she was a child. We weren't sure for a while if she could get preggers, she's been trying for a while.

We've been wanting grandkids so badly that we were starting to look a kids in ill-attended shopping carts with larcenous thoughts. I want to be the grandad who teaches them to ski, sail, fly fish, and act silly. 

 

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1 hour ago, IStream said:
3 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

IMG_1590.thumb.jpg.7662415df22b802616418074c5b3486b.jpg

If you sent me that Eames chair, you'd have room for at least four more guitars...

I wanna know about the pedals. Looks like two red somethings (keeley dirty red? Not too many four knob overdrives out there) and a Tube Screamer, no idea about the rest but looks like a quality rig. I've gone to mini pedals myself

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Didn't you say you hated the Fuzz Face? I love mine, just gotta be careful what it's in line with. They don't play well with others. This board is meant to carry in a gig bag, it's got a Joyo rechargeable power supply built in. The effects are the fuzz, mini Tube Screamer (IMHO sounds 99.9% as good as the original), octave, tremolo, chorus, delay... I've really gotten into doubled delay sounds but it's easy to over-do... reverb, and looper. I don't use chorus or octave much, am thinking of simplifying and adding more options for dirt, maybe vibe, and echo.

And the J-200 coffee table.... is that a real guitar laying on the floor under the table, or a table built out a guitar?

Oh and sailing... dunno what to say here, sailed one of the program boats Sunday and I'm putting a goddam inverter in our big boat. Boats are a PITA

FB- Doug

 

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1 hour ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Yeah, Mrs. Loser has been at the kids place in Austin watching the Animal Farm while the kids vacation at our home in Taos, for the last couple of weeks. She is already feathering their nest, she hopes to be done with some minor remodeling when they get home, to surprise them. She's done this before, with welcome results. 

Our daughter has had a tough time with the pregnancy until recently. She's had severe rheumatoid arthritis since she was a child. We weren't sure for a while if she could get preggers, she's been trying for a while.

We've been wanting grandkids so badly that we were starting to look a kids in ill-attended shopping carts with larcenous thoughts. I want to be the grandad who teaches them to ski, sail, fly fish, and act silly. 

 

I hope all goes well for your daughter and the wee one. 

Both my grand dads died before I came along, something I never got to experience, so I'm lucky to have 5 to terrorize.

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IMG_4663.thumb.jpg.c8addac8c9a11908445e1d9381c442f5.jpg

This has gone wildly far afield from the original topic, but today was our last day on the water, motoring around the point through the murk to fill up the diesel tank for the winter before she gets hauled this weekend.  We were soaked but not too cold, and as much as I love seeing the harbor filled with boats, seeing the empty mooring balls through the fog is its own sort of beauty.

With Covid, I'm guessing I'm unlikely to get in another meaningful trip until she's back in the water again, but the memories will do for a while.

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6 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

I wanna know about the pedals. Looks like two red somethings (keeley dirty red? Not too many four knob overdrives out there) and a Tube Screamer, no idea about the rest but looks like a quality rig. I've gone to mini pedals myself

DSCN0308sm.jpg.16fff3fa5ec14818eb92e46cf439cb16.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Didn't you say you hated the Fuzz Face? I love mine, just gotta be careful what it's in line with. They don't play well with others. This board is meant to carry in a gig bag, it's got a Joyo rechargeable power supply built in. The effects are the fuzz, mini Tube Screamer (IMHO sounds 99.9% as good as the original), octave, tremolo, chorus, delay... I've really gotten into doubled delay sounds but it's easy to over-do... reverb, and looper. I don't use chorus or octave much, am thinking of simplifying and adding more options for dirt, maybe vibe, and echo.

And the J-200 coffee table.... is that a real guitar laying on the floor under the table, or a table built out a guitar?

Oh and sailing... dunno what to say here, sailed one of the program boats Sunday and I'm putting a goddam inverter in our big boat. Boats are a PITA

FB- Doug

 

Yeah, I hate the fuzz face. From the guitar i have a Cry Baby, blue compressor /sustain that I don't use,  Klon KTR,  Tube screamer, 2 - TC Hall of Fame reverb/delays on different settings, and a flanger I don't use. For that room I use a 62 Deluxe brownface or a Marshall 18 watt. 

The coffee table is built with the bottom half of a big acoustic guitar case in a drawer under the glass. Fully functional, just pull out the guitar and play.   One side of the table is weighted so it can't tip The guitar is an A&H Montana Gold. 

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I'm not giving up yet.

Sometimes the Chesapeake is brutal and sailing is "done" in late December. Sometimes the water actually turns hard and we have the occasional icebreaker churn up the bay. Last year, we were in the "neutral" phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation. No El Nino or La Nina. This resulted in a non-winter as the polar vortex mostly stayed where it damn well belongs- on the north pole.

This winter, a weak La Nina is predicted. We're supposed to have cold temps at the beginning and end of winter with a warmer than normal period in the middle.

Of course this is Maryland, and anything is possible. Yesterday was foggy in the morning, and 74F by afternoon and sunny. Today will be similar. The weekend is forecast to be pleasant. 72F for the high and 46F for the low, with clouds.

I have to go into work early Saturday morning to migrate a small VM to another datacenter. Hopefully it will only take an hour or two and then I'll head out for the weekend with my buddy who sailed his sistership up to my docks.

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5 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Yeah, I hate the fuzz face. From the guitar i have a Cry Baby, blue compressor /sustain that I don't use,  Klon KTR,  Tube screamer, 2 - TC Hall of Fame reverb/delays on different settings, and a flanger I don't use. For that room I use a 62 Deluxe brownface or a Marshall 18 watt. 

The coffee table is built with the bottom half of a big acoustic guitar case in a drawer under the glass. Fully functional, just pull out the guitar and play.   One side of the table is weighted so it can't tip The guitar is an A&H Montana Gold. 

Ah so, I thought your pedals would run left to right! I have never played a real Klon. The guitar case table is an awesome idea... that would keep it handy yet protected. Looks like a beauty too.

Our sailing is actually better thru the winter. It gets chilly sometimes but there's less windless days and the drifters are easier to take.

FB- Doug

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I only got to sail once this summer, and not even on my own boat. I brought my Viper 640 to the club in May, and never even unzipped the cover. I brought her back to the barn in September.

We did one race on @ZeroTheHero's Seascape 24, and then there was a positive test at the sailing center where he works. Our club started a dinghy racing night for the first time in years, and got a bunch of Lasers and Aeros out every Thursday. I got jealous watching and occasionally filming from shore, and bought a used Aero last month. Apparently, there are now five, so I helped build a fleet without sailing.

I must say that @dylan winter reminds me a bit of Guardian cartoonist David Squires for the clever wit.

Cheers

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1 hour ago, Bull City said:

The forecast for yesterday was for a light wind. I went out anyway, since often the forecast underestimate the wind. Not so yesterday; it was practically windless.

It's still wonderful to just sit on the water. Well, most of the time anyway.

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Just returned last Sunday from Catalina...the crowds are thinning out (large power boats).  Air most days in the high 70s to low 80s..water 72-74, vis about 40 feet.  The season over there is just beginning   Good sailing to and from, no crowds, moderate temps.  Had a great moment one morning as the wife and I were having coffee in the cockpit...a large bald eagle flew over us in the cove at about 30 feet. The next day too up island.  The eagles were re-introduced in 1980.  Have only seen two in the last 30 years.  What a sight.  Have to put a jacket and socks on the boat now...rig for cold weather...

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If you must haul for the winter, parking it in sight of your bedroom door can help shake off the midwinter blahs sometimes! Of course, Taos may add a level of difficulty to the plan.

enhance

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4 hours ago, Ajax said:

Of course this is Maryland, and anything is possible. Yesterday was foggy in the morning, and 74F by afternoon and sunny. Today will be similar. The weekend is forecast to be pleasant. 72F for the high and 46F for the low, with clouds.

We were on our way home from an overnight yesterday, leaving Eastern Bay and heading for the Rhode River.   The clouds were starting to give way to blue sky.  In the early afternoon, when we were around halfway across the Chesapeake a dense fog rolled in - the visibility dropped to around 100 feet or so.  Looking up you could still see the blue sky through the fog. Twenty or so minutes later it began to clear.

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4 minutes ago, slap said:

We were on our way home from an overnight yesterday, leaving Eastern Bay and heading for the Rhode River.   The clouds were starting to give way to blue sky.  In the early afternoon, when we were around halfway across the Chesapeake a dense fog rolled in - the visibility dropped to around 100 feet or so.  Looking up you could still see the blue sky through the fog. Twenty or so minutes later it began to clear.

Wow, funky!

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1 hour ago, Willin' said:

If you must haul for the winter, parking it in sight of your bedroom door can help shake off the midwinter blahs sometimes! Of course, Taos may add a level of difficulty to the plan.

enhance

I think CL can take solace knowing Restive is snug inside one of Brooklin Boat yards buildings getting pampered and prepped for next season.

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On 10/20/2020 at 10:29 PM, Cruisin Loser said:

I miss it terribly. Already. I feel...a little bit of despair, without my boat until spring. 

Ok, there is the expected first grandchild, but good lord, why can't Maine Summer's last 12 months a year?

Cruisin', having a little experience sailing in Maine summer, I get this. Completely. But there is the bit about the off season making the in season so much more wonderful, pleasure denied for a few months and all that. I think of the Byrds' "Turn Turn Turn." I'll shut up now, but some nice guitar playing and skinny legs.

 

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20 hours ago, Black Sox said:
On 10/21/2020 at 11:24 PM, TwoLegged said:

One of the joys of my life was buying a new trapeze harness aged 50, and having great fun with it.

Sailing?

Or...

Hahaha. :D  I have no head for heights, so I'd never try the high wire.

Sailing my Laser 2000.  A real jewel of  a boat, a joy on every point of sail, with a sweet helm

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49 minutes ago, Whinging Pom said:

Just re-launched my cruising boat after 20 months ashore refitting, So I'll be sailing through the winter.  Wretched Covid business meant I couldn't sail the Flying Fifteen either.2069433544_Oct232020_0051.thumb.JPG.fc43691df7611c2de69874d859c2b73a.JPG

 

Why can't I turn the photo round ??

Because the boat is at the equator? 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 10/21/2020 at 2:11 PM, Cruisin Loser said:

I had a 16' Boston Whaler sailboat here, but the lakes are so low and far away that I gave it away for a small donation to the HS Robotics team.

As to guitars, we jammed at the house the other night (we'll play tonight as well) and I snapped a picture of the aftermath. There are more upstairs, more in a storage room. Not sure another guitar is really what I need, but my wife, I'm sure, appreciates the suggestion.:rolleyes:

IMG_1590.thumb.jpg.7662415df22b802616418074c5b3486b.jpg

Just curious CL, what is the guitar in the coffee table display case? Also, is that clear cylinder thingy for Allman Bros. style slide guitar?

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23 minutes ago, On The Hard said:

Just curious CL, what is the guitar in the coffee table display case? Also, is that clear cylinder thingy for Allman Bros. style slide guitar?

That's a Gibson J180 Montana Gold, from their Bozeman custom shop. It's just a hair smaller than the SJ200, and is basically their most blinged out version of it, in terms of wood selection. Plays like a dream, my go-to acoustic.  Yes, that's a glass slide, that one is for the pinky, I use a different size for the index finger.

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IMG_0018.thumb.JPG.2b071c6c6ffa6499fdd435de5f945b61.JPG

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12 hours ago, Slick470 said:

Did the same, talked the wife and kids into doing it too. Beautiful day on the water. 

Good for you, man. You're one of the people who really need to do it.

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3 hours ago, Ajax said:

Good for you, man. You're one of the people who really need to do it.

I don't know about that, but It was definitely nice to get the family involved and with a good outcome. The weather was jut too nice to not go out. 

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