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Amateur couple rebuilds salvage cruiser


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26 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

I used tsp in a spritzer to clean decades old teak.

The first couple of passes the grim literally rinsed off - looked like tobacco juice..

Ish's formula looks very good but I suspect requires good ventilation due to the ammonia.

It sure does. But you should see the old oil and gunge running down the wood.

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Like watch it before commenting? Have you no respect for internet traditions?  

Sure I would. It's the Chevy of the seas, not a Pininfarina. If you drive it like a rental (Which it was) you'll get wear and tear like a rental. Hitting rocks with boats is bad, as I understand it th

To be fair, most keels are bolted on, the question is, what are they actually bolted TO...

Posted Images

8 hours ago, GH41 said:

If this is the listing for their boat it looks like they knew what was wrong with it up front. https://www.certifiedsales.com/listings/YS200075.html

What kind of inspection finds no damage... but then four years later:

Quote

t is reported that in June 2015 this 49' Beneteau was underway and experienced a hard grounding on a ledge. The vessel was towed back to port and hauled. The inspection found scrapes and gouges on the keel and rudder. No repairs were effected and the vessel was placed back into service as the vessel was not in a leaking condition.
During a replacement of a bilge mounted water pump, by a mechanic in the Fall of 2019, it was discovered that significant damage existed to the hull grid system.

So someone had a grounding. hauled out.. inspection (that inspector ought to be demoted to sharkbait) found NO ISSUES.. .and then... it was sailed?  it was sold?  what happened?

That is a seamy story in itself.....

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If you spray, start at the bottom and spray to the top. Sopping up the spooge is easier that way. 

45 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

It sure does. But you should see the old oil and gunge running down the wood.

 

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28 minutes ago, Toecutter's Ghost said:

Why da fuck didn't they disconnect and remove the TV set before making all that mess. That is annoying the crap out of me.

 

Me too!    A 40" Vizio tv is under $200 but yeah - remove the entire main cabin but leave the TV up?  Strange       

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Low twos if the damage and repair isn't disclosed. If sold as a salvage repaired by the kids I can't imagine it has any value. How do you insure something like that without overlooking the truth?? A totaled car title is just that. Hard to sell and insure. With boats does the MSO get stamped salvaged? 

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1 hour ago, GH41 said:

Low twos if the damage and repair isn't disclosed. If sold as a salvage repaired by the kids I can't imagine it has any value. How do you insure something like that without overlooking the truth?? A totaled car title is just that. Hard to sell and insure. With boats does the MSO get stamped salvaged? 

At least they will have an amazing documentation of them either doing an outstanding job or totally fucking it up.

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6 hours ago, Marcjsmith said:

my dilemma is cleaning the old wood first.  heres whay I'm looking at on the forward bulkhead  the areas originally behind the cushions look fine,  the areas not "protected" looking bad.  disregarding the headiner

IMG_9623.jpg

Looks like a good candidate for painting the expanses (off-white, satin) and leaving only the trim bright.

Much less work and looks better, IMO.

 

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10 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

At least they will have an amazing documentation of them either doing an outstanding job or totally fucking it up.

Only thing they can document is chasing their tail! If they are not licensed and insured the repairs they are making don't add any value to the boat to anyone other than another dreamer. 

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1 hour ago, GH41 said:

Only thing they can document is chasing their tail! If they are not licensed and insured the repairs they are making don't add any value to the boat to anyone other than another dreamer. 

Would it not be possible to get a naval architect or "qualified surveyor" to supervise the repair now that they have everything exposed?   If they follow the instruction of someone qualified in laminates and their work is inspected regularly they should be ok.   

One assumes that the reason the boat was written off was the labour cost to have a yard perform the repair at $175/hour.  We haven't seen anything that suggests the boat is not repairable, it just wasn't economically repairable for the insurance company.

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15 minutes ago, Rain Man said:

Would it not be possible to get a naval architect or "qualified surveyor" to supervise the repair now that they have everything exposed?   If they follow the instruction of someone qualified in laminates and their work is inspected regularly they should be ok.   

One assumes that the reason the boat was written off was the labour cost to have a yard perform the repair at $175/hour.  We haven't seen anything that suggests the boat is not repairable, it just wasn't economically repairable for the insurance company.

Possible, yes.

Now find a qualified & insured architect, engineer or surveyor who wants to put his name on a certificate of structural adequacy.

The bottom line problem is, the AS BUILT at the factory design is inadequate.

FKT

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That was the process followed by surveyors for builders seeking a Lloyds 100 A1 certification.

Periodic visits & inspections to document the processes followed.

It is (was) expensive.

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10 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

That was the process followed by surveyors for builders seeking a Lloyds 100 A1 certification.

Periodic visits & inspections to document the processes followed.

It is (was) expensive.

Yeah - I did that with a house I built. At various stages I got the consulting civil engineer to inspect & sign off.

Wasn't that expensive because I wasn't cutting any corners and he'd certified the structural details before we started the build. First inspection was at the reinforcing steel stage for the concrete slab.

Here - God knows what other 'gotchas' are buried in the hull layup. Even if they fix what they know about, it still might fail. I'd not even look at it were I a professional, just in case I ended up in court regardless.

I watched one vid from 'Parley Revival' where they rebuilt a catamaran. Only to find out, after they'd launched and were getting ready to cross the Pacific, there were other really serious structural issues. Didn't watch further as f/g catamarans are way outside my general interest areas.

FKT

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I think the fact that it is all documented is a huge plus.  You dont have to be a structural engineer to understand what an acceptable job is.  The standards here are pretty clear- 12:1 scarfes minimum on the bonds, epoxy resin for all secondary bonds.  Three layers of 1808 or equivalent will probably be stronger than anything the original grid bonding system had going for it.  They found all kinds of voids and delamination not related to the grounding.  How many other Bene's have those too?  Truth be told I'd rather buy this particular boat with the ability to know what I've really got- that my grid is indeed bonded to the hull- than take a risk on even a "well surveyed"  boat with unknown history.  They do it right they can win financially on this- $100k into a $200k boat?

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2 minutes ago, boatcat65 said:

I think the fact that it is all documented is a huge plus.  You dont have to be a structural engineer to understand what an acceptable job is.  The standards here are pretty clear- 12:1 scarfes minimum on the bonds, epoxy resin for all secondary bonds.  Three layers of 1808 or equivalent will probably be stronger than anything the original grid bonding system had going for it.  They found all kinds of voids and delamination not related to the grounding.  How many other Bene's have those too?  Truth be told I'd rather buy this particular boat with the ability to know what I've really got- that my grid is indeed bonded to the hull- than take a risk on even a "well surveyed"  boat with unknown history.  They do it right they can win financially on this- $100k into a $200k boat?

except that you will have to get used to feeling itchy all the time and that white powder shows up everywhere, even when you turn on the tv.

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3 minutes ago, AnotherSailor said:

except that you will have to get used to feeling itchy all the time and that white powder shows up everywhere, even when you turn on the tv.

I know- my gawd, I can't believe they didn't pull the soft goods and tape the cabinets at a minimum.  But these two are so anal I actually think they'll get it clean in the end.  It's just going to take a while...

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8 hours ago, hard aground said:

It would be interesting to know the time stamp on their videos. They are somewhere in the North/East I believe, have a shit ton of work to do, and as Jon Snow used to say "winter is coming..."

Looks like West Narragansett Bay, Warwick or such RI. They motored up the East Passage and in their van they drove south on I-95 past the Veismann Shop just south of Providence. Been a warm fall but it’ll be too cold for glass work soon. 

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6 hours ago, boatcat65 said:

I think the fact that it is all documented is a huge plus.  You dont have to be a structural engineer to understand what an acceptable job is.  The standards here are pretty clear- 12:1 scarfes minimum on the bonds, epoxy resin for all secondary bonds.  Three layers of 1808 or equivalent will probably be stronger than anything the original grid bonding system had going for it.  They found all kinds of voids and delamination not related to the grounding.  How many other Bene's have those too?  Truth be told I'd rather buy this particular boat with the ability to know what I've really got- that my grid is indeed bonded to the hull- than take a risk on even a "well surveyed"  boat with unknown history.  They do it right they can win financially on this- $100k into a $200k boat?

There is not a prayer this would sell close to $200k when done with a major structural amateur repair. I’m not sure anyone would even insure it. 

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They are in Appanoag Cove in Warwick RI. I don’t know what yard.  I may go on safari and search them out.  They ha d made some rookie mistakes for which it hard to condemn them for, and generally I would like to see the succeed. It might be a kind of state pride thing.  You cannot live on top of or inside a project like this.

My general feeling is that they should take the machinery out of the Beneteau and put it in something that isn’t fucked up. 

The videos are of progress made weeks if not months ago based on a few tells. They mention July 4th on one of videos when they are really stuck into the grinding.  

SHC

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14 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

I watched one vid from 'Parley Revival

I just went to check this channel and I must say that even though I usually don't share those "Bendytoys" and similar comments about low quality mass produced boats, I'm surprised about the construction of this Lagoon 450 (in a bad way). Even if the boat's been through a hurricane.

 

 

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12 hours ago, Cashelmore said:

Couldn’t they just hose down the interior and let the mess drain out the hole where the keel was?

I did this on an Olson 30 after a keel grid repair following a hard grounding.  There was fiberglass dust absolutely everywhere, in spite of all the plastic sheeting we put up and vacuums attached to grinders, etc.  So we ended up hosing it out and shop vac'ing the slurry out the sump.  Took a couple of rinses.  However, there's not much "interior" to wreck on an Olson 30 that isn't used to being wet all the time anyhow.

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3 hours ago, chuso007 said:

I just went to check this channel and I must say that even though I usually don't share those "Bendytoys" and similar comments about low quality mass produced boats, I'm surprised about the construction of this Lagoon 450 (in a bad way). Even if the boat's been through a hurricane.

 

 

Hard to say on that one. She might have been airborne in Tortola at one time and had a hard landing on Beef Island . Both Beneteau and Lagoon are keeping arm's length from these  repairs as far as going out of their way to provide assistance. Not sure I blame them with DIY amateur repairs. Another Youtuber who is going  it alone instead of getting some marine architect help and advice on a proper repair.      

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8 minutes ago, Cristoforo said:

Hard to say on that one. She might have been airborne in Tortola at one time and had a hard landing on Beef Island . Both Beneteau and Lagoon are keeping arm's length from these  repairs as far as going out of their way to provide assistance. Not sure I blame them with DIY amateur repairs. Another Youtuber who is going  it alone instead of getting some marine architect help and advice on a proper repair.      

Actually these guys already brought a naval architect, the Lagoon dealer and the kiwi captain is a professional CE. So he knows what he's doing. But the fact that some bulkheads are just glued sounds like a bad idea. 

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10 minutes ago, chuso007 said:

Actually these guys already brought a naval architect, the Lagoon dealer and the kiwi captain is a professional CE. So he knows what he's doing. But the fact that some bulkheads are just glued sounds like a bad idea. 

The Kiwi is a mechanic not a structural engineer versed in catamaran loads. Yeah he can fix an engine. And the other guy was the Panama Lagoon salesman. And they may have gotten some free advice from the guy on a mooring next to them.  Not sure that’s the same. 

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2 hours ago, Ultraman said:

I did this on an Olson 30 after a keel grid repair following a hard grounding.  There was fiberglass dust absolutely everywhere, in spite of all the plastic sheeting we put up and vacuums attached to grinders, etc.  So we ended up hosing it out and shop vac'ing the slurry out the sump.  Took a couple of rinses.  However, there's not much "interior" to wreck on an Olson 30 that isn't used to being wet all the time anyhow.

Everybody doesn't do this?

After a tough offshore race, I frequently take up all the floorboards and cushions, drag a hose down below and rinse everything off, from headliner to lockers. Open the hatches and an hour or two later everything is dry. Just be careful around the nav station.

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1 hour ago, Tom Keffer said:

Everybody doesn't do this?

After a tough offshore race, I frequently take up all the floorboards and cushions, drag a hose down below and rinse everything off, from headliner to lockers. Open the hatches and an hour or two later everything is dry. Just be careful around the nav station.

Brave

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1 hour ago, Tom Keffer said:

Everybody doesn't do this?

After a tough offshore race, I frequently take up all the floorboards and cushions, drag a hose down below and rinse everything off, from headliner to lockers. Open the hatches and an hour or two later everything is dry. Just be careful around the nav station.

Hi Tom I have just run an add looking for part time boat detailers. If you see the ad...the position is filled.

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1 hour ago, LB 15 said:
3 hours ago, Tom Keffer said:

Everybody doesn't do this?

After a tough offshore race, I frequently take up all the floorboards and cushions, drag a hose down below and rinse everything off, from headliner to lockers. Open the hatches and an hour or two later everything is dry. Just be careful around the nav station.

Hi Tom I have just run an add looking for part time boat detailers. If you see the ad...the position is filled.

You need another step, where you spray teak oil onto the bulkheads with a pump-up garden sprayer.

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We are forgetting that when young our stamina is high and our labor is free. Money on the other had is in short supply. The only option for all that stuff is to pay to store it somewhere for months. On balance spending a week cleaning at the end of the project is probalby worth it to them. I know some soft goods will never be trully dust free, but they are a young couple living in a tiny space with two dogs and sleeping in the van next to the boat. I doubt it will be a big deal to them.

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5 hours ago, OPAL said:

Whatever about the boat, they will never clean out their lungs, the way they are gancing around in that thing and everything covered in thick dust, traces will be still there 20 years from now.

This is the reason filtered cigs kill more people than unfiltered. The fiberglass filaments in the filters embed in the lung tissue and hold the tar. I am lucky to still be alive. 

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4 hours ago, GH41 said:

This is the reason filtered cigs kill more people than unfiltered. The fiberglass filaments in the filters embed in the lung tissue and hold the tar. I am lucky to still be alive. 

That's nice that you're still alive but it's a popular myth that cigarette filters contain fiberglass.  They don't.  The primary material in cigarette filters is cellulose acetate.  The cellulose usually comes from from cotton or wood pulp.

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9 hours ago, Ed Lada said:

That's nice that you're still alive but it's a popular myth that cigarette filters contain fiberglass.  They don't.  The primary material in cigarette filters is cellulose acetate.  The cellulose usually comes from from cotton or wood pulp.

I'd also be curious to know how they got the comparison - do unfiltered cigarettes even exist anymore?

It's been decades since I saw someone smoking one.

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They have a new video posted. I watched a few minutes and it seems that their cleaning method consist of blowing air in all the dusty spots (which is everywhere). This is after they cleaned up all the surface dust... It is like cleaning a staircase with a broom starting at the bottom working your way up.

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2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

I'd also be curious to know how they got the comparison - do unfiltered cigarettes even exist anymore?

It's been decades since I saw someone smoking one.

I don't know about the US, but in Poland there are still a couple of brands of non-filtered smokes.  And of course the roll your own option is available, but most people I know that roll their own roll a filter into them as well.

It turns out that studies have shown that non-filter cigarettes aren't any worse than filtered cigarettes.  And I found out that many years ago, cigarette manufacturers added chemicals to turn the filter brown to make folks thing that the filter is actually keeping that brown shit out of your lungs.  It turns out it is just a heat activated substance.  

I hate when I find out things I thought to be true for years aren't true at all.  Dammit!

 

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Everything those stupid bastards did to cigarettes beyond plain tobacco made them more toxic.

Spend untold billion$ to make your product more deadly, kill off more of your customers and make yourselves look like even worse sociopathic scum.

Great business plan.

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Rather watch them make grind glass, but cigarette filters do suffer from “fall out.”  

Our analysis of the “fall-out” tests results presented in the 61 “fall-out” documents showed that filter fibres and carbon particles were discharged from the filters of all types of cigarettes tested.”

”The rationale for harm assessment is supported by the results of consumer surveys that have shown that the ingestion or inhalation of cigarette filter fibres are a health concern to nearly all smokers.”

if you care:

https://tobaccocontrol.bmj.com/content/11/suppl_1/i51

Can we get back to dust now?

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41 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Everything those stupid bastards did to cigarettes beyond plain tobacco made them more toxic.

Spend untold billion$ to make your product more deadly, kill off more of your customers and make yourselves look like even worse sociopathic scum.

Great business plan.

Sure, you have a good point.  But I am hopelessly addicted to tobacco and I'm not going to quit at this point in my life.

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25 minutes ago, Ed Lada said:
1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Everything those stupid bastards did to cigarettes beyond plain tobacco made them more toxic.

Spend untold billion$ to make your product more deadly, kill off more of your customers and make yourselves look like even worse sociopathic scum.

Great business plan.

Sure, you have a good point.  But I am hopelessly addicted to tobacco and I'm not going to quit at this point in my life.

They werre tryeng macke it moire addictteng, notte moire lethalle, that wase a by producte.                      :)

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42 minutes ago, Crusty said:

I’m out. 15 minutes of watching someone vacuum dust is enough for me. The girl is cute but I think she’s been told that a few too many times. Someone wake me when something interesting happens... 

I became a patron. But it’s conditional on her getting a decent set of tits installed by Christmas. 

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33 minutes ago, Crusty said:

I’m out. 15 minutes of watching someone vacuum dust is enough for me. The girl is cute but I think she’s been told that a few too many times. Someone wake me when something interesting happens... 

Next episode is going to be wet cleaning with a hose and bikini... or not

If they showed how to clean the boat I would be willing to endure this. But what they do is clean the boat, the blow some air which creates more dust, followed by cleaning the boat again. Oh yes, when they are not blowing dust they are cleaning without respirators. What a mess.

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hm, this type of thing does seem to be all the rage..

holly from "another adventure" managed to bag a stripped out and beached 55' Jeanneau in Puerto Rico. in all fairness she seems to have got it off the beach and floating.. which is impressive in itself.. but looks to be a bit of fettling ahead

 

 

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She has been doing this for a while. She is working on boats during the charter season and obviously is not wealthy and I am sure there have been some difficulties in the past. Is this boat a wise decision? Not sure, but I bet her repairs will be decent. I would actually hire her to do work on my boat, not those other two clowns.

 

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This has been discussed to death already. They are relying on a glued joint to bond the two structures together. This process works when all steps are done properly. But the nature of the joint means one cannot inspect the bonding areas after assembly or after any impact. So any mistakes in surface prep, glue application (location/amount) or fit of the two parts leads to an understrength joint. Visual examination of the joint areas after a impact event is also very constrained, as impact crack may not extend to the small visible edge of the bond. Even using remote cameras to examine interior joints is difficult, as the glue will have extruded from the joint, and assessing whether there is a crack or just the edges of the 'ooze' will be difficult.

   IIRC Beneteau does not disclose what glue they use, so an analysis of it's properties under loads is not possible Perhaps a glue with more flex would be able to resist the impact loads better

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

They would use Plexus for that wouldn't they?

From what I understand it's the go-to goo for non-fastened hull/deck joints and suchlike.

I thought they were using some kind of polyester spooge, from my hazy memories of the Cheeki Rafiki thread.

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59 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Buying it by the tank car probably reduces the cost a lot compared to what we pay by the tube.

And applying big random blodges of it increases the chances that it actually touches more than one surface.

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4 hours ago, Caca Cabeza said:

Looks like Beneteau has some 'splainin to do about their construction vs. design specs. Inquiring insurers want to know.

I don't think Bene set out to build a shitty boat. They wouldn't have a GL policy if they did. I doubt they could be held responsible for shoddy repairs done twice as in this case. Bottom line should be... It cannot be repaired after a hard grounding. There is a reason why they built boats in Marion SC... Real cheap labor!! They took people out of the fields and pulpwood industry to build boats for 9 bucks an hour. They probably got millions in tax incentives to do it. The liberal way to get rich while making the taxpayers feel good for doing it. 

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Bottom line is they do build a low end product, so every aspect (labor, supplies) gets parsed by the pencil pushers yearning to squeeze out some more profit. It's not their concern (or liability) if one grounding totals a boat. In fact, that opens up the market to sell another new Benny!!

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On 11/14/2020 at 1:51 AM, robtoujours said:

hm, this type of thing does seem to be all the rage..

holly from "another adventure" managed to bag a stripped out and beached 55' Jeanneau in Puerto Rico. in all fairness she seems to have got it off the beach and floating.. which is impressive in itself.. but looks to be a bit of fettling ahead

 

 

Is this the boat that got stolen from a mooring somewhere in the Eastern Caribbean a few months ago and then ran aground in PR with the thieves arrested, and actual owners never able to get there as they were overseas and couldn't travel in due to COVID?

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Could be, holly bought the salvage rights direct from the owner after it had been stripped of most stuff.. apparently the owner then tried to stiff her after she got the thing off the beach but she made sure to document everything .. apparently.. 

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I've been through this Bene Keel / grid issue myself. Through some navigation errors on my part I managed a hard grounding on some rock. Nothing too obvious at the time, got it back to the dock, wrapped up the season. a subsequent detailed bilge inspection found the frame parted from the hull and cracks and fatigue around the keel bolts. Only discovered this 9 weeks before scheduled launch date so had to hustle to fix things. It was an extra challenge as the ambient temperature was -5 Celsius and I had to endure multiple ice storms so there was a whole lot of creative tenting and heating going on to get things to proper temps for correct set and bonding. But I was religious about temperature control to get good sets on various lay ups I did. All my matrix was pre-cut at home on the bench and labelled inclusive of peel ply. On the job site I'd keep resin and hardener in a sous vide water bath so it would flow, mix and set properly for me during layup.

Long story short, took out about 75 lbs of plexus / bonding agent and replaced it with 120 lbs of glass and epoxy for the length of the keel. That included grinding out all compromised glass around the keel bolt locations and building that all back up again. The thickest part being some 48 layers of 9oz IIRC. Re-bonded all tabs to the hulls with bodge then built up a dozen layers minimum of bonding tab to hull as well. I did one structural bay at a time so I would not have to drop the keel due to my storage circumstances. I would fully remediate one structural bay with the keel bolts off in that area, then put the keel bolts back in and move to the next area sequentially. I'm comfortable the boat is stronger than the day it left the factory. Been no issues since then, and yes I do check it regularly. Three hours before launch I was still torqueing keel bolts but I made it. She's been a treat since then and now I pay more attention to those rock things.

And yes, despite masking off the main cabin from everything else I still find pockets of dust here and there when I open things up. It never goes away it seems.

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2 hours ago, blunted said:

I've been through this Bene Keel / grid issue myself. Through some navigation errors on my part I managed a hard grounding on some rock. Nothing too obvious at the time, got it back to the dock, wrapped up the season. a subsequent detailed bilge inspection found the frame parted from the hull and cracks and fatigue around the keel bolts. Only discovered this 9 weeks before scheduled launch date so had to hustle to fix things. It was an extra challenge as the ambient temperature was -5 Celsius and I had to endure multiple ice storms so there was a whole lot of creative tenting and heating going on to get things to proper temps for correct set and bonding. But I was religious about temperature control to get good sets on various lay ups I did. All my matrix was pre-cut at home on the bench and labelled inclusive of peel ply. On the job site I'd keep resin and hardener in a sous vide water bath so it would flow, mix and set properly for me during layup.

Long story short, took out about 75 lbs of plexus / bonding agent and replaced it with 120 lbs of glass and epoxy for the length of the keel. That included grinding out all compromised glass around the keel bolt locations and building that all back up again. The thickest part being some 48 layers of 9oz IIRC. Re-bonded all tabs to the hulls with bodge then built up a dozen layers minimum of bonding tab to hull as well. I did one structural bay at a time so I would not have to drop the keel due to my storage circumstances. I would fully remediate one structural bay with the keel bolts off in that area, then put the keel bolts back in and move to the next area sequentially. I'm comfortable the boat is stronger than the day it left the factory. Been no issues since then, and yes I do check it regularly. Three hours before launch I was still torqueing keel bolts but I made it. She's been a treat since then and now I pay more attention to those rock things.

And yes, despite masking off the main cabin from everything else I still find pockets of dust here and there when I open things up. It never goes away it seems.

Would you buy another Beneteau?

Cheers,

              W.

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9 minutes ago, WGWarburton said:

Would you buy another Beneteau?

Cheers,

              W.

Sure I would. It's the Chevy of the seas, not a Pininfarina. If you drive it like a rental (Which it was) you'll get wear and tear like a rental. Hitting rocks with boats is bad, as I understand it this is an axiomatic truth in sailing and has been since you could lash a few logs together and ride down a river. Nothing much has changed about that.

I have no doubt the keel system was loosened up by others when the boat did its tour of duty as a Sunsail boat, but through my own negligence I sealed the deal and nearly ripped the fucker off. Could the boat have been built tougher? 100% for sure it could. But you get what you pay for.

Besides, it's kind of a cascading failure problem. If you take the kinetic energy of a 22,000 lb boat doing 7.2 knots and smack it back into the boat through the keel system, somethings gotta give, no matter who built it. Then the question becomes, "What gave?". As it happens in a Bene due to so-so bonding of the matrix, that turned into the fuse. Had it been glued on better no doubt something else would have taken that kinetic energy. Perhaps the engine mounts, or the bulkhead bonds to the hull, maybe the hull would buckle and express a network of hairline cracks emanating out from the trailing edge of the keel. There's no free ride for bad navigation, there's only repair bills of varying dimensions or a long drawn out argument with the insurance adjuster. Perhaps the rig would fall down as the backstays could let go.

I got lucky and detected the impending failure with time and opportunity to do something about it before it turned tragic for me and the family.

you could build some play into the bonding agent, that could act like a fuse but then guys like me would complain the boat is not very stiff and feels wobbly. you have to make design choices and live with them.

So I don't really have a quarrel with Beneteau, that shit was on me. As far as I am concerned they deliver good bang for the buck. If you want an expedition ready craft, buy something made for that at three times the price per linear foot. If you want to enjoy your 120 days of the year when the water is thawed and you can quaff some cocktails, operate a swim platform, do some light cruising and get laid, a Bene seems to be just fine for that.

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12 hours ago, robtoujours said:

Could be, holly bought the salvage rights direct from the owner after it had been stripped of most stuff.. apparently the owner then tried to stiff her after she got the thing off the beach but she made sure to document everything .. apparently.. 

Thanks for posting this. I was all prepared for it to be a clusterfuck, but she sure seems to know what she is doing. Good example of not judging a book by the cover. 

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On 11/15/2020 at 9:08 PM, GH41 said:

I don't think Bene set out to build a shitty boat. They wouldn't have a GL policy if they did. I doubt they could be held responsible for shoddy repairs done twice as in this case. Bottom line should be... It cannot be repaired after a hard grounding. There is a reason why they built boats in Marion SC... Real cheap labor!! They took people out of the fields and pulpwood industry to build boats for 9 bucks an hour. They probably got millions in tax incentives to do it. The liberal way to get rich while making the taxpayers feel good for doing it. 

I thought they closed the factory down there a few months back?

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1 hour ago, TwoLegged said:

Episode 2 of Sinking-70ft-wooden-schooner is even better than the first.  The boat is monumentally fooked, and is now about to be hauled out to start munching boat bucks

 

So there's no feelgood before tragedy? These people need a better writer.

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10 minutes ago, zenmasterfred said:

Holy Fucking Train Wreck Batman!  

Who are the people helping them?  Are they out of their minds too?  What are they going to do when they discover the topsides are rotten beyond economic and feasible repair? 

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1 minute ago, Rain Man said:

Who are the people helping them?  Are they out of their minds too?  What are they going to do when they discover the topsides are rotten beyond economic and feasible repair? 

An appeal for cardboard and carboard derivataves ensues. Some gelcoat, some corrugated cardboard and chicken wire, some Portland cement, it's all good.

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34 minutes ago, Rain Man said:

Who are the people helping them?  Are they out of their minds too?  What are they going to do when they discover the topsides are rotten beyond economic and feasible repair? 

They people helping them are fellow vloggers ... who now have a huge drama unfolding which will supply lots of gripping content.

 

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58 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

An appeal for cardboard and carboard derivataves ensues. Some gelcoat, some corrugated cardboard and chicken wire, some Portland cement, it's all good.

As long as they don't use any cello tape it should be good.

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1 hour ago, TwoLegged said:

They people helping them are fellow vloggers ... who now have a huge drama unfolding which will supply lots of gripping content.

 

If that thing ever gets out in the ocean, it will not last as long as the Flyin' Hawaiian.  

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2 hours ago, Rain Man said:

Who are the people helping them?  Are they out of their minds too?  What are they going to do when they discover the topsides are rotten beyond economic and feasible repair? 

Point windup_gullible at them and they'll have a completely detailed solution using only renewable bio-resources.

Or they could just burn the boat and save a lot of heartache. Preferably with the wyndah fuckwit inside.

FKT