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Stainless Steel Surrounding for Origo stove?


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The prior owner of my Centaur had been in the middle of several projects prior to my acquisition of the boat; one of these was fitting a gas stove. Nothing other than the stove was mounted, along with a stainless steel surrounding with an integrated mount. Unfortunately, he trimmed away a significant bit of the dishware storage, making it difficult to fit dishes in there or find dishes that will fit. I've plans on returning the storage area to its original size... it's just a little woodwork & fiberglass, easy peasy. However, that gas stove had a stainless steel surrounding, with an integrated cutting board that fits into supports on the top. It's a simple surrounding, just sheet metal bent with a lip around the top. I also have the gimbal mounts coming in from eBay; may as well mount it properly.

I figure my options are:

  • Dump the stainless steel surround, leaving it painted fiberglass
    • Might be hard to clean (spitting bacon grease)
    • Safety concerns if something flares up and drips.
  • Line the surrounding fiberglass with simple stainless steel sheet
    • Ought to be safer
    • Ought to be easier to clean
    • Might not look the best, unless trimmed out appropriately
  • Spend a few bucks and have someone local modify the old mount, shortening it to fit the new stove.
    • Likely uglier, depending on how they cut & weld it
    • Probably cheaper than fabbing a new one
  • Spend a few more bucks and have the fabber make up a new surrounding with the lip and all.
    • $$$
    • Done proper.

I know... this thread useless without photos. I'll see about getting over to the boat tonight and grab some. In the meanwhile, what's the collective mind think?

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I like Option #2 but need to see photos first.

Don't leave it bare fiberglass. You think cleaning cooking grease from stainless steel is hard? Painted fiberglass will be nasty.

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It depends on your plans for the boat and what and how you will, realistically, cook while aboard.  I gather that this is your first cruising boat, based on your other posts.  Realize that it is the experience of others that people new to cruising who purchase a trailer sailor do not ordinarily have it become their "forever boat."

The Centaur is a small boat.  On most boats that size, the stove, to the extent that it is used at all, is used to boil water or perhaps heat up some soup or stew.  Galley space, maximum crew size, and absence of refrigeration auger against a culinary tour de force, even among sailors who like to cook and who are comfortable cooking in camp settings.

The Origo has an infinitely variable output that can be adjusted anywhere between "simmer" and "medium."  Using one to produce grease spatters is an advanced technique.

My advice would be to put it back together with inexpensive materials, go sailing, and revisit it after you see how the stove works out.

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1 minute ago, 2airishuman said:

The Origo has an infinitely variable output that can be adjusted anywhere between "simmer" and "medium."  Using one to produce grease spatters is an advanced technique.

Oooh, I'm in the advanced class!  An Origo gets hot enough to spatter bacon grease everywhere. ;) The critical thing is that it can boil water for coffee.

It does sound like a Centaur galley is best for Dinty Moore.

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2 hours ago, Ajax said:

I like Option #2 but need to see photos first.

Don't leave it bare fiberglass. You think cleaning cooking grease from stainless steel is hard? Painted fiberglass will be nasty.

Bare fibreglass being better than varnished teak veneer. 

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58 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Oooh, I'm in the advanced class!  An Origo gets hot enough to spatter bacon grease everywhere.

The only way I've been able to do it is by preheating the pan before putting the bacon in.

Sort of like backing off half a mile and accelerating for a pass on a two lane road if you're driving a car with the Origo equivalent for an engine.

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Just now, 2airishuman said:

The only way I've been able to do it is by preheating the pan before putting the bacon in.

Sort of like backing off half a mile and accelerating for a pass on a two lane road if you're driving a car with the Origo equivalent for an engine.

The trick is to use cast iron skillets. They retain heat very well.

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

Oooh, I'm in the advanced class!  An Origo gets hot enough to spatter bacon grease everywhere. ;) The critical thing is that it can boil water for coffee.

It does sound like a Centaur galley is best for Dinty Moore.

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Lives in the oven in between uses. Keeps the spatter down to a dull roar.

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22 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

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Lives in the oven in between uses. Keeps the spatter down to a dull roar.

I'm on Amazon right now... I'll buy 2, one for the house as well.

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24 minutes ago, Ajax said:

I'm on Amazon right now... I'll buy 2, one for the house as well.

We use those at the house as well. Three sizes I think. Nice to have when cooking anything that splatters grease, but primarily used for bacon...  

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Heh. First operation with the Origo when I got it out of the box? Poured some Everclear into the canister, put a small cast iron pan down, and fried up bacon. Worked darn well, though I hadn't picked up the flame spreaders yet, and the pan developed a bit of a hot spot. Still worked well enough to fry up bacon, plenty fine. Boiled water for tea/coffee quick enough, too.

Anyhow, here's the photos. Please excuse the cleanliness... this is after the initial cleaning, but before the final. Figured I'd save that 'til I'm done grinding bevels in fiberglass. Makes a bit of a mess, whodathunk?

Chopping board is stained a bit. Figure I can replace it easily enough.

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Origo fits, with 7/8" on either side. I'd expect the gimbal mounts to need less; I'll know better this weekend after they show up. 

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Looks to be tack welded at the bottom. Might get lucky, separate the left or right wall from the rest of it, trim it back, cut & bend a couple lips, then tack weld again? 

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Frame's already notched out for the sheet metal lip. There's only two retaining screws on the left, and the rear beam floats. Not keen on that... granted, I'm not likely to get knocked down sailing on the Hudson or the Mohawk, but we go back to that "if you're gonna do it, do it right" bit.

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There's a lot of wasted space underneath, behind that dish storage. Makes me rethink the storage layout... might be better to extend that  storage further back, maybe drawers in there instead. There ain't so much room on this Centaur that I can go wasting it. Ought to figure that out before I replace that chunk of missing fiberglass.

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In reply to 2airishuman: I was lucky enough to grow up a poor white kid in the Adirondacks. Our idea of camping was a couple old sleeping bags, a few ropes, and a tarp. Wasn't well off enough to own a tent... toss in an air mattress or a pad, and we would've been in heaven. Spent high school living in a single wide trailer, sharing a bedroom with my brother. Had enough room 'tween the bed and the dresser to get out of bed, if the drawers weren't open. The summer before we put the trailer in, the ground was too wet to move the trailer up to the pad... so the five of us lived out of a smallish RV. The trailer was an improvement.

Point is, staying on the Centaur ain't half bad, in comparison. I suppose it's missing some amenities and has its fair challenges, mostly concerning having enough electrical power for the "modern necessities" of hot water on demand, refrigeration, freezing... but there's ways of dealing with those if a guy's determined enough. 

I'm gonna keep an eye out for an Origo 6000, though. Being able to bake bread, albeit a challenge, will be sorely missed by myself. Ain't much better than fresh warm baked bread on a cold night. Might fit on the other side of the galley, if I sort out the storage there...

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Our favorite bacon method for the boat is to pre-cook it at home (415°F 18 minutes in the oven on a tinfoil covered tray) and then re-fry it on the boat.

Our first boat had an Origo, only thing annoying was waiting for it to cool before refilling it.

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1 hour ago, The Lucky One said:

In reply to 2airishuman: I was lucky enough to grow up a poor white kid in the Adirondacks. Our idea of camping was a couple old sleeping bags, a few ropes, and a tarp. Wasn't well off enough to own a tent... toss in an air mattress or a pad, and we would've been in heaven. Spent high school living in a single wide trailer, sharing a bedroom with my brother. Had enough room 'tween the bed and the dresser to get out of bed, if the drawers weren't open. The summer before we put the trailer in, the ground was too wet to move the trailer up to the pad... so the five of us lived out of a smallish RV. The trailer was an improvement.


Point is, staying on the Centaur ain't half bad, in comparison. I suppose it's missing some amenities and has its fair challenges, mostly concerning having enough electrical power for the "modern necessities" of hot water on demand, refrigeration, freezing... but there's ways of dealing with those if a guy's determined enough.

I do take your point and we have a shared background in many ways.  It's your project and that's part of the charm.  I'm just saying I've been there and have an Origo on my trailer sailor now (and on my old boat that is for sale), and find that I don't use it to the extent I anticipated.

Post up on this thread in a year and let us know how it works out.

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On 11/16/2020 at 11:10 AM, The Lucky One said:

The prior owner of my Centaur had been in the middle of several projects prior to my acquisition of the boat; one of these was fitting a gas stove. Nothing other than the stove was mounted, along with a stainless steel surrounding with an integrated mount. Unfortunately, he trimmed away a significant bit of the dishware storage, making it difficult to fit dishes in there or find dishes that will fit. I've plans on returning the storage area to its original size... it's just a little woodwork & fiberglass, easy peasy. However, that gas stove had a stainless steel surrounding, with an integrated cutting board that fits into supports on the top. It's a simple surrounding, just sheet metal bent with a lip around the top. I also have the gimbal mounts coming in from eBay; may as well mount it properly.

I figure my options are:

  • Dump the stainless steel surround, leaving it painted fiberglass
    • Might be hard to clean (spitting bacon grease)
    • Safety concerns if something flares up and drips.
  • Line the surrounding fiberglass with simple stainless steel sheet
    • Ought to be safer
    • Ought to be easier to clean
    • Might not look the best, unless trimmed out appropriately
  • Spend a few bucks and have someone local modify the old mount, shortening it to fit the new stove.
    • Likely uglier, depending on how they cut & weld it
    • Probably cheaper than fabbing a new one
  • Spend a few more bucks and have the fabber make up a new surrounding with the lip and all.
    • $$$
    • Done proper.

I know... this thread useless without photos. I'll see about getting over to the boat tonight and grab some. In the meanwhile, what's the collective mind think?

A picture might help. 

 

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22 hours ago, sculpin said:

Our first boat had an Origo, only thing annoying was waiting for it to cool before refilling it.

Heard the secret is to cook with one side 'til empty, then fill the other side while the first is cooling. 'Course, it's a small stove to begin with. Good thing I like one pot wonders...

21 hours ago, 2airishuman said:

I do take your point and we have a shared background in many ways.  It's your project and that's part of the charm.  I'm just saying I've been there and have an Origo on my trailer sailor now (and on my old boat that is for sale), and find that I don't use it to the extent I anticipated.

Post up on this thread in a year and let us know how it works out.

 

Ain't a half bad idea. To be fair, too... I might change my mind at some point down the road. Could get old and decrepit, and get it through my thick skull that cruising in such a state isn't going to make me happy. I do plan on easing my way into cruising... a long four day weekend every month or so to start out, then week long vacations... two week long vacations... and I figure a few years of that will get me sorted out on whether this is something I want to do. I've certainly got enough loose ends to tie up in the meanwhile, before I can just pick up and go. 

20 hours ago, AnotherSailor said:

A picture might help. 

See a few posts above. They're showing up for me, at least. Are they not showing up for you?

I'm giving some serious thought to simply cutting one of the left/right walls off, trimming it back, notching and bending lips in, and having it rewelded. I'd expect that to be less expensive and less time consuming than fabbing it up from scratch.

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6 minutes ago, The Lucky One said:

Heard the secret is to cook with one side 'til empty, then fill the other side while the first is cooling. 'Course, it's a small stove to begin with. Good thing I like one pot wonders...

 

Ain't a half bad idea. To be fair, too... I might change my mind at some point down the road. Could get old and decrepit, and get it through my thick skull that cruising in such a state isn't going to make me happy. I do plan on easing my way into cruising... a long four day weekend every month or so to start out, then week long vacations... two week long vacations... and I figure a few years of that will get me sorted out on whether this is something I want to do. I've certainly got enough loose ends to tie up in the meanwhile, before I can just pick up and go. 

See a few posts above. They're showing up for me, at least. Are they not showing up for you?

I'm giving some serious thought to simply cutting one of the left/right walls off, trimming it back, notching and bending lips in, and having it rewelded. I'd expect that to be less expensive and less time consuming than fabbing it up from scratch.

I see no pictures except the ones I posted.

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So, to clarify: you want to make the existing stainless surround a bit less wide?  Would the gimbal then even fit?

For about an inch of extra storage space, I am with Ishmael on this one. 

BTW that is not a gas stove, it is an alcohol stove. I have one myself and love it. Just refill before it gets even close to empty so you don't deal with a hot one...

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Cut the ss liner to the correct size & get it welded. If you do a clean job cutting the end plate off, the new weld will be almost invisible. This is the fastest, best, & cheapest solution. You can do the rough cutting if you've got a good small grinder, just takes time & patience.

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20 hours ago, AnotherSailor said:

So, to clarify: you want to make the existing stainless surround a bit less wide?  Would the gimbal then even fit?

For about an inch of extra storage space, I am with Ishmael on this one. 

BTW that is not a gas stove, it is an alcohol stove. I have one myself and love it. Just refill before it gets even close to empty so you don't deal with a hot one...

Gimbals should be arriving Friday; I'll get the bits measured out this weekend. No sense in trimming the surround back if the gimbals won't fit. And you're right, that's not the gas stove that was in it originally... this one was:

IMG_0164.thumb.jpg.350243de45b6c58cc4f49166ddbd5241.jpg

Pulled it out and sold it for a few bucks on eBay. Couldn't see myself going to the effort of putting in a proper gas locker, running the lines, and installing the proper safety equipment, when I'm satisfied with an Origo.

I'm still really thinking about taking that dish storage area and putting in a couple of drawers, regardless of whether I trim the surround or not. There's a lot of wasted space behind there.

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35 minutes ago, The Lucky One said:

Gimbals should be arriving Friday; I'll get the bits measured out this weekend. No sense in trimming the surround back if the gimbals won't fit. And you're right, that's not the gas stove that was in it originally... this one was:

IMG_0164.thumb.jpg.350243de45b6c58cc4f49166ddbd5241.jpg

Pulled it out and sold it for a few bucks on eBay. Couldn't see myself going to the effort of putting in a proper gas locker, running the lines, and installing the proper safety equipment, when I'm satisfied with an Origo.

I'm still really thinking about taking that dish storage area and putting in a couple of drawers, regardless of whether I trim the surround or not. There's a lot of wasted space behind there.

dude, that's a sweet stove

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1 hour ago, AnotherSailor said:

 

I have a gas stove collecting dust. Did exactly what Lucky did for exactly the same reasons. I did not sell mine on ebay yet

There you go, Chester. Make an offer. Propane is sweet to cook on. There is actually an "up" setting.

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On 11/19/2020 at 4:33 PM, longy said:

Cut the ss liner to the correct size & get it welded. If you do a clean job cutting the end plate off, the new weld will be almost invisible. This is the fastest, best, & cheapest solution. You can do the rough cutting if you've got a good small grinder, just takes time & patience.

I would leave it alone. This is the fastest and cheapest solution. 'Best' is a value judgement.

FWIW I do a fair bit of TIG welding on stainless and I'd not take on metal that's probably only 0.6mm to 0.9mm thick with any confidence the end result would be distortion free & almost invisible. But then I hate welding sheet metal anyway.

FKT

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Not sure where you are but there are guidelines for stove instillations and air gaps. The SS in the pic looks like the break gives a 1/2" which is a little light but the existing does probably provide better protection than nothing.  I second FKT, ss has to be very clean to weld and a old cooking space would be the complete opposite of that.  Even very careful cold cuts via jig saw etc will probably leave you with a warped noodle.  Have seen lots of gimbal spacers on boat stoves.

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On 11/18/2020 at 11:37 PM, AnotherSailor said:

So, to clarify: you want to make the existing stainless surround a bit less wide?  Would the gimbal then even fit?...

And we've got a winner.

Received the gimbal mounts... and there's just enough space left over after the mounts are installed. No sense in chasing a 1/16" - 1/8" inch of space.

I did end up cutting the lip off the bottom front. With it in place, there's not enough room to allow the stove to sit flat on its bottom and be able to open/close the stove to get at the canisters. I took a rotary tool with a cut-off wheel, and nipped it off. Wasn't the prettiest result, but I didn't wander too bad off a straight line. A little bit of white trim to keep the sharp edges away from skin for the time being, and I'll call it good enough for now. Might end up doing something different than the white trim later.

Still needs a good cleaning. I did sand down the cutting board, knocking the old finish off along with the stains. I'll see about getting it leveled out and then oiled up. That grooved channel to catch liquid and bits isn't fair, neither... I'll clean it up a bit, then stop looking at it before it drives me crazy.

01124202013.thumb.jpg.60057ad68a28ba37f0fddf57f37b3f47.jpg1124202012.thumb.jpg.00ecea798e4e29a234e92044bff225ad.jpg

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On 11/17/2020 at 6:39 PM, sculpin said:

Our favorite bacon method for the boat is to pre-cook it at home (415°F 18 minutes in the oven on a tinfoil covered tray) and then re-fry it on the boat.

Our first boat had an Origo, only thing annoying was waiting for it to cool before refilling it.

Do people know the holey soup can fill method? Still have to let it cool but pretty much spill-free. 

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On 11/17/2020 at 9:39 PM, sculpin said:

Our favorite bacon method for the boat is to pre-cook it at home (415°F 18 minutes in the oven on a tinfoil covered tray) and then re-fry it on the boat.

Our first boat had an Origo, only thing annoying was waiting for it to cool before refilling it.

I understand that some keep a damp rag handy to cool it more quickly.  I found it easier just to refill it often enough to avoid running out. Remember the gasket and it won't evaporate. I avoid spills by breaking the alcohol down into 3/4 liter fuel bottles.

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8 hours ago, Ishmael said:

Nice clip on the quote. Thanks.

You're welcome! One of my personal pet peeves that I try not to inflict on the rest of the community at large. No sense in duplicating content that ain't being referenced in my post.

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13 hours ago, The Lucky One said:

And we've got a winner.

Received the gimbal mounts... and there's just enough space left over after the mounts are installed. No sense in chasing a 1/16" - 1/8" inch of space.

I did end up cutting the lip off the bottom front. With it in place, there's not enough room to allow the stove to sit flat on its bottom and be able to open/close the stove to get at the canisters. I took a rotary tool with a cut-off wheel, and nipped it off. Wasn't the prettiest result, but I didn't wander too bad off a straight line. A little bit of white trim to keep the sharp edges away from skin for the time being, and I'll call it good enough for now. Might end up doing something different than the white trim later.

Still needs a good cleaning. I did sand down the cutting board, knocking the old finish off along with the stains. I'll see about getting it leveled out and then oiled up. That grooved channel to catch liquid and bits isn't fair, neither... I'll clean it up a bit, then stop looking at it before it drives me crazy.

01124202013.thumb.jpg.60057ad68a28ba37f0fddf57f37b3f47.jpg1124202012.thumb.jpg.00ecea798e4e29a234e92044bff225ad.jpg

Ha, what do I win!

Looks great! I might sand mine down as well. What kind of oil would you use on that?

 

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Mineral oil is the usual go-to for cutting boards.

Quote

Mineral oil (sometimes called liquid paraffin) is a non-toxic, non-drying product derived from petroleum that is colorless, odorless, and flavorless. Its properties prevent water absorption, which makes food-grade mineral oil (as determined by the Federal Drug Administration) a popular choice for wooden kitchen items such as wooden spoons, bowls, and, of course, cutting boards and butcher blocks. The key word here is food-safe, as there are types of mineral oils that are not safe for human consumption; these are often used as lubricants for machinery or found in auto or hardware stores. 

 

If you are worried about selecting the right mineral oil, product labeled as “white mineral oil” are considered food safe, as these are refined to a certain degree past other oils. Always make sure to carefully read the product's labeling if you are unsure about its proper use. The safest route of course is to buy a mineral oil specifically blended for use in cutting boards such a  Howard's Cutting Board Oil or our own brand of Food Grade Mineral Oil.

https://www.cuttingboard.com/blog/what-type-of-oils-are-safe-to-use-on-your-cutting-board/

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Sanded it down, glued one small crack, filled in a bunch of the existing seams with melted beeswax, scraped off the excess, then gave it a few coats of warmed up butcher block conditioner. Looking good now!

1130200852.thumb.jpg.e339c47dbc7fb1ed446dda608335bd38.jpg

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I've come late to this, so perhaps irrelevant now..... but why the focus on gimbals? They're 'one plane' only.

Many singlehanders with similar-sized boats - and I'm one - have dispensed with gimbal mounts and simply use good pan clamps. I don't do a whole lot of complex cooking under way....

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On 11/17/2020 at 10:41 AM, 2airishuman said:

The Origo has an infinitely variable output that can be adjusted anywhere between "simmer" and "medium."  Using one to produce grease spatters is an advanced technique.

HAHAHAHAHAHAHA  And O So True

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1 hour ago, bilbobaggins said:

I've come late to this, so perhaps irrelevant now..... but why the focus on gimbals? They're 'one plane' only.

Many singlehanders with similar-sized boats - and I'm one - have dispensed with gimbal mounts and simply use good pan clamps. I don't do a whole lot of complex cooking under way....

Because monohulls heel primarily in one plane? Pan clamps are a good idea regardless but they don't clamp the contents of the pan. Gimbals prevent a lot of sloshing.

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22 hours ago, bilbobaggins said:

I've come late to this, so perhaps irrelevant now..... but why the focus on gimbals?...

My thoughts:

  • Let's do it "proper", I'm in there anyway. I may not be cooking while I'm underway, but being able to heat up a pot of water for coffee or tea is nice. Amazing how a hot beverage can cheer a person up. Pot holders are next on the list.
  • The mounts weren't all that expensive and not difficult to install. If I don't like them, I can remove them easily enough.
  • Now that I've gotten around the idea of increasing the space for the dish storage by a minimal amount, any space taken up by the gimbals would just be empty space if I were to remove them. I'm not modifying that surround any further, so there's no real advantage yet to remove them.
  • I'd love to run across one of those fully gimballed Sea Swing alcohol stoves, but I've only ever seen them at a price I'm not willing to pay just to heat up a cup of water.
  • The boat deitiy(ies) seem to require financial and blood sacrifices; I'm working on the theory that self imposed small sacrifices applied regularly will be enough to stave off the non-self imposed major ones.
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12 minutes ago, The Lucky One said:
  • The boat deitiy(ies) seem to require financial and blood sacrifices; I'm working on the theory that self imposed small sacrifices applied regularly will be enough to stave off the non-self imposed major ones.

Apparently it works for opus dei members but I prefer to drink and whore around and take my chances.

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