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Excuse me sir, have we invented a new word for cocaine...  snowblow? 

Kidding aside we had a thing called the Snow Beast...  and it was a beast.  Best part was a electric start...    Pretty sure you could find one on Craigslist...

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I have owned two Ariens. Both were about 2 feet wide. It took 20 years to wear out the first one. A light is essential. Electric start is nice as well. I plow now and just put a big snowblower on the tractor to handle the greenhouse and high tunnel. If  I were buying a walk behind today I would go with at least 30”. I would look at the Husquvarnas as well

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Thanks, guys.  After many years of not taking my share of the chores due to too much focus on work, I am happily the snowblower and frequently the dishwasher.

For heavy stuff, or the farm road, I use the bucket on the tractor.  But its tough on the driveways if I don't leave a lot of snow behind.  Selma prefers new equipment so it has a known maintenance history.  I'm thinking 30" electric start two sage with a light.  Do I want three stage?  Tracks?  I see guys with the canopies, but that seems excessive.

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I have a 30 inch 2 stage. I do a 200 feet double width driveway. With a 6 inch snow it takes me 40 minutes. 10 inches might take an hour. 
Gravel driveways you will adjust the shoe to give you about an inch of clearance. But buy a couple of extra shear pins. Better to have them and not need them. 

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33 minutes ago, cyclone said:

I have owned two Ariens. Both were about 2 feet wide. It took 20 years to wear out the first one. A light is essential. Electric start is nice as well. I plow now and just put a big snowblower on the tractor to handle the greenhouse and high tunnel. If  I were buying a walk behind today I would go with at least 30”. I would look at the Husquvarnas as well

Who do you like for equipment dealers around here - we're not too far apart.

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I had several before I smartened up and moved to where I no longer needed one (hint   this is the correct answer..).

I would go with the Ariens.  They are solid and they are all steel.  Toro has started going to plastic parts.  Not what you want when it is 20 below.

Note the John Deere is last year's Ariens in JD green usually with a 1 hp smaller motor.   But you may be able to score one at a good price.

 

Both Toro and Ariens are easy to get parts for 15 years down the road.

Changing the power belt for the auger on the Ariens is a piece of cake as you remove 2 bolts and the case splits open.  Toro is a lot more work.

Stay away from the MTD (eg Murrays, craftsman etc).  Cheap only at time of purchase. Bad designs, bad engineering, bad materials.  As the old saw goes "good tools save work, bad tools make work".

 

Use only synthetic oil as the motors last longer (I used to average 20 years) and if you have a power outage where the electric start is not working, it will hand crank over a whole lot faster.

Whatever you buy, wax it inside and out with car wax before you use it.  Snow will not stick as easily and it will look better a whole lot longer 10 years down the road.

Electric hand warmers are nice, but if you have the room, get one of those plastic caps to keep the blowing snow into your face when using in a blizzard.  It creates a dead air zone so it feels warmer when using it at 10 at night with 60 mph winds.

If you have gravel, I suggest the purchase of several sets of shear pins.  When those rocks get jammed in the auger, the shear pins are going go die to save your transmission.  You will have your spares when it happens.

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16 minutes ago, Foreverslow said:

I had several before I smartened up and moved to where I no longer needed one (hint   this is the correct answer..).

I would go with the Ariens.  They are solid and they are all steel.  Toro has started going to plastic parts.  Not what you want when it is 20 below.

Note the John Deere is last year's Ariens in JD green usually with a 1 hp smaller motor.   But you may be able to score one at a good price.

 

Both Toro and Ariens are easy to get parts for 15 years down the road.

Changing the power belt for the auger on the Ariens is a piece of cake as you remove 2 bolts and the case splits open.  Toro is a lot more work.

Stay away from the MTD (eg Murrays, craftsman etc).  Cheap only at time of purchase. Bad designs, bad engineering, bad materials.  As the old saw goes "good tools save work, bad tools make work".

 

Use only synthetic oil as the motors last longer (I used to average 20 years) and if you have a power outage where the electric start is not working, it will hand crank over a whole lot faster.

Whatever you buy, wax it inside and out with car wax before you use it.  Snow will not stick as easily and it will look better a whole lot longer 10 years down the road.

Electric hand warmers are nice, but if you have the room, get one of those plastic caps to keep the blowing snow into your face when using in a blizzard.  It creates a dead air zone so it feels warmer when using it at 10 at night with 60 mph winds.

If you have gravel, I suggest the purchase of several sets of shear pins.  When those rocks get jammed in the auger, the shear pins are going go die to save your transmission.  You will have your spares when it happens.

Thanks - agreed that living where there is no snow is a good thing, at least when there's now.  

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I can't top what Foreverslow and cyclone said, I agree with it all.  I'm totally happy with my 20 year old Ariens and have gotten great service from Brunswick Home and Garden on the one occasion where I stupidly used a regular bolt to replace a broken shear pin and chewed up the gear box. Keep a good supply of shear pins on hand. I have had to get a few sheet metal welds repaired and replaced the shoes a few times as well, but that's no biggee on a $1000 plus unit.

Most Ariens and Cubs seem to come with a dedicated chute shovel nowadays, but it doesn't hurt to spray down with PAM before you go out in warm snot. If you have a gravel driveway, keeping the chute coated with fresh paint at the end of each season when you service the engine is a cheap and easy thing.

With over 600 ft of gravel driveway, half of which is steep, I've often wondered about the tracked units but since the engine on my old Ariens horse just won't quit I guess I'll have to keep wondering.In my opinion, snowsheds are for sissies. Do you want your face to look like a smooth skinned teen forever or, like moi, have that gravel faced look that hot women seem to adore?

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1 hour ago, sshow bob said:

Thanks, guys.  After many years of not taking my share of the chores due to too much focus on work, I am happily the snowblower and frequently the dishwasher.

For heavy stuff, or the farm road, I use the bucket on the tractor.  But its tough on the driveways if I don't leave a lot of snow behind.  Selma prefers new equipment so it has a known maintenance history.  I'm thinking 30" electric start two sage with a light.  Do I want three stage?  Tracks?  I see guys with the canopies, but that seems excessive.

Toss the neighbor $10 or $15 and an IPA or IPA, Bock or Pils each snow.  Next year a Single Malt Scotch or nicer bourbon and he will forget about the $10 or $15

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9 hours ago, Willin' said:

Most Ariens and Cubs seem to come with a dedicated chute shovel nowadays,

That’s what old hockey sticks are for

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on campus,  we use a multitude of equipment for snow removal,  blades, buckets, rotating brooms,  we also have some snow blowers.  the downside for us is that they campus leaders never want the snow to get deep enough to really allow the blowers to dig their teeth in.  we have half a dozen or so of the tracked honda's similar to whats pictured above.  i will say that the honda has never ever failed to start going on 10 years.  being a gravel drive,  you need to make sure you have nice shoes on the blower so it doesn't dig in and start shooting rocks out..

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I know something about snowmobiles...

My dad bought a monster snowblower when I was in grade school.  It was a beast and could pull me right up the driveway.  But the drive shifter would get stuck occasionally.  One day, after finishing up our driveway, I'm bringing it into the garage when the shifter gets stuck again.  I'm banging away on it and it's pulling me right toward my brand new bicycle.  The snowblower won and did a tune on my bike.

I also know that over gravel they can dig into it and sent stones flying.

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15 year old Toro bought from dealer that closed. Actually have a hard time finding parts in my area of southern New Hampshire. Go figure.

Agree with having extra shear pins or proper bolts around. Always break in the middle of the task and during the most frigid or inclement conditions. Tip. Put the specific tools you need to replace aside and ready to go. It will speed an uncomfortable task. Also get a pair of the sacrificial guide shoes on either side. They do wear down.

I'm getting chains for the wheels this winter. Have a decent slope on part of the driveway and if there is an icy base the machine simply takes off down the driveway in a graceful often sideways slide. The stuff of stupid youtube vids but dangerous. I wear spikes if it's dicey and don't have a problem but the machine isn't as fortunate.

Starts easily but having the electric start is a nice backup.

Invest in the warmest waterproof mitts you can find.

 

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Just now, usedtobeoldestsailor said:

Best, four wheel drive tractor with a heated cab and an eight foot snow blower.

Or next winter, Mexico.

 

 

 

 

available, Mexico.

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I don't own one but the people I know say you need to do the following things:

1) Make sure it is self propelled.

2) Make sure it is wide enough for you driveway and sidewalks.

3) Get it tuned up every year.

4) The damn thing will never start when you actually need it like on Christmas when you have 12" of snow and the whole family is coming over. 

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When my mother decided to move south finally, I inherited her brand new (at the time) Troy-Bilt. I have to say that it has worked flawlessly for several seasons, but I can't imagine it would have been on my list if I was looking to dump my own money... just has a 'flimsy' feel/look to it... again, it has lasted 4/5 seasons at this point so I really SHOULDN'T speak ill of it....

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Radiant heated driveway?

Seems a tad bit excessive, but that's perhaps just me...

It is a thing though, surprisingly enough.

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Thanks everyone. I like the tractor idea, but I need to use the machine in two different places. My tractor goes in the woods, anyway, so no cab. 

We are getting an Ariens tonight. Lights, heated grips, etc. I appreciate the input. 

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18 hours ago, sshow bob said:

Thanks, guys.  After many years of not taking my share of the chores due to too much focus on work, I am happily the snowblower and frequently the dishwasher.

For heavy stuff, or the farm road, I use the bucket on the tractor.  But its tough on the driveways if I don't leave a lot of snow behind.  Selma prefers new equipment so it has a known maintenance history.  I'm thinking 30" electric start two sage with a light.  Do I want three stage?  Tracks?  I see guys with the canopies, but that seems excessive.

What's your budget

How much pto hp do you have, and what's the rpm?

Put a blower on the tractor if you can.

 

I'm looking at getting a skid loader for snow removal with a blower, and unloading trucks with forks in the winter, that's almost $100k though

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2 hours ago, Windward said:

Radiant heated driveway?

Seems a tad bit excessive, but that's perhaps just me...

It is a thing though, surprisingly enough.

My daughter and SIL are going to build a house in Park City, UT, and are planning to put in a heated driveway.

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41 minutes ago, Hatin' life said:

What's your budget

How much pto hp do you have, and what's the rpm?

Put a blower on the tractor if you can.

 

I'm looking at getting a skid loader for snow removal with a blower, and unloading trucks with forks in the winter, that's almost $100k though

Tractor makes 44hp at the PTO at whatever the standard speed is. Can run a big blower. But I can't get the tractor to both properties. 

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2 hours ago, No Bargers said:

If you get the self propelled make sure it will disengage one of the wheels when you turn.

Do NOT do that!

MTD used to have clutches outboard on the axles.

great for first use.  If you had to make a 2nd pass later that night, they inevitably had melted snow into the clutch assemblies and their detentes were frozen in the middle rendering the unit no drive.

You then had to remove the wheel to gain access to the clutch and it was only good for that set of passes.

Extra grease made no difference.

 

Both TORO and Ariens have a quick pin that can clock the wheel  to the axle or let it completely freewheel.

You lock it in the winter as there is enough slip in the road to maneuver.  DItto when you go to park it in the garage.

In the spring, you unlock one wheel and can easily pivot it anywhere your heart desires.

 

And the best snowblower I have seen is the one Rudy Kurtikia built.

Rudy was the town welder when I was a kid in the 60s.

6 foot 6, arms of steel and bald.  Looked like the dude on the Mr Clean bottle.

Rudy welded up a 8 foot auger and bolted a 1940s Crosley auto engine to it.

Added 2 hand clutches so he could move it about like a tank.

This was to do his driveway in 1 pass.

He also plowed the roads for the town in his 1962 chevy pickup with a couple tons of fancy wrought iron welded up front (aka advertising).

Once went head on with a drunk in a 76 Caddy Eldorado who strayed into his lane.

Needed to respray the wrought iron.  The Caddy was a complete total...

 

And shear pins are NOT normal bolts.

They have a taper/grooves built into them to snap as the auger outer shaft rotates on the inner drive shaft.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/STENS-Shear-Pin-Shop-Pack-for-Ariens-ST420-ST924-John-Deere-John-Deere-AM136890-AM122156-91550-7091550YP-1-3865-780-011/313276150?NCNI-5

save $3.  Blow up the $800 transmission or tear the augers off the shaft.   Not a good risk/reward there..

 

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34 minutes ago, Foreverslow said:

And shear pins are NOT normal bolts.

They have a taper/grooves built into them to snap as the auger outer shaft rotates on the inner drive shaft.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/STENS-Shear-Pin-Shop-Pack-for-Ariens-ST420-ST924-John-Deere-John-Deere-AM136890-AM122156-91550-7091550YP-1-3865-780-011/313276150?NCNI-5

save $3.  Blow up the $800 transmission or tear the augers off the shaft.   Not a good risk/reward there..

 

fancy...pretty sure my craftsman just uses standard bolts though.

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You do know that now that you've bought a snow blower, you won't get any significant snow this year.... Right?

Your neighbors are thanking you.

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57 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

You do know that now that you've bought a snow blower, you won't get any significant snow this year.... Right?

Your neighbors are thanking you.

Promise?  If I could just pay a snowblower worth every ten years for no heavy snow, I'd be a happy man. Maples wouldn't like it though. 

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25 minutes ago, sshow bob said:

Promise?  If I could just pay a snowblower worth every ten years for no heavy snow, I'd be a happy man. Maples wouldn't like it though. 

I'd pay it yearly, still cheaper than my plow bill, and everything else doesn't suck.

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Oddly I am seeing beet juice used as a de-icer these days.

I have little knowledge beyond idle chit-chat, but if it reduces salt use I am all for it.

Plowing snow is a grueling job.  I did it for a few east coast winters for a plow company.  Good money as a kid though.  Made me sleepy in highschool to plow all night then go to school.  

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I have a toro that I just had refreshed.  That isn't going anywhere.

But locally I can get new cub cadets easy.  What engines are current cub cadet a using and how reliable are they?  John deere is a dying breed. And a new mower, snowblower probably is in my nearish future

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On 12/3/2020 at 9:02 PM, bmiller said:

Hire the neighbor kid?

cheaper in the long run

 

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23 minutes ago, peragrin said:

I

.  What engines are current cub cadet a using and how reliable are they?  John deere is a dying breed. And a new mower, snowblower probably is in my nearish future

You pretty much get what you pay for.  The big box store John Deere lines are different and cheaper than the John Deere dealership equipment.  I need a snowblower 5 or 6 times a year and my 20 (or more) year old "Snow King 8hp 26" does great, but I switched to a 20" single stage Toro or MTD 4 stroke 3 years ago. The little one is faster because turn around is instant.

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On 12/3/2020 at 8:13 PM, woodpecker said:

Honda with tracks.

Honda HSS1332ATD

I second this. If you want reliability and long life, go with the Honda.  I bought a Honda 1132 with pull start (electric start was another $4-500 at the time I think) and it's always started on the first pull (it's fourteen years old).  I run it out of gas in the Spring for storage, in the Fall I put fresh gas in and it starts on the first pull.  The tracks are great.  I have a long driveway and a steep exit and it does it all effortlessly, and it chucks the snow.  I live in a hilly neighborhood and as a result we share a driveway with the neighbor.  They have a Toro or Ariens and it's useless.  I prefer that they don't snowblow the steep because their snowblower leaves a film of snow every time and it adds up.

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A foot or two of snow takes me a couple of hours to clear...with a shovel. Saves on gym memberships and having to buy one of those strange indoor stationary bikes where you can look at a trail on a video screen.

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On 12/3/2020 at 5:54 PM, sshow bob said:

Selma has suggested its time for a snowblower.  I am game.  Who has an opinion?

I need to clear two short driveways - both gravel.

ain't snow another name for blow

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2 hours ago, WCB said:

I second this. If you want reliability and long life, go with the Honda.  I bought a Honda 1132 with pull start (electric start was another $4-500 at the time I think) and it's always started on the first pull (it's fourteen years old).  I run it out of gas in the Spring for storage, in the Fall I put fresh gas in and it starts on the first pull.  The tracks are great.  I have a long driveway and a steep exit and it does it all effortlessly, and it chucks the snow.  I live in a hilly neighborhood and as a result we share a driveway with the neighbor.  They have a Toro or Ariens and it's useless.  I prefer that they don't snowblow the steep because their snowblower leaves a film of snow every time and it adds up.

Ditto, I think my Honda is going on 15 years also. Starts first pull every time. I clear the roofs of my commercial buildings with it along with my driveways. Never had a problem with it.  Would not by one without tracks on it.
 

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20 hours ago, ropetrick said:

We have had a two stage Ariens for fifteen years. Changed the oil every spring at the end of the season. No problems ever.

I hope that you have the same experience.

Same.  We call him Snowtorious B.I.G. and I the clear the driveway and sidewalks of our court of 12 townhouses, as well as the sidewalks a block each way, north and south.

big.jpg

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On 12/4/2020 at 9:04 AM, redboat said:

15 year old Toro bought from dealer that closed. Actually have a hard time finding parts in my area of southern New Hampshire. Go figure.

Agree with having extra shear pins or proper bolts around. Always break in the middle of the task and during the most frigid or inclement conditions. Tip. Put the specific tools you need to replace aside and ready to go. It will speed an uncomfortable task. Also get a pair of the sacrificial guide shoes on either side. They do wear down.

I'm getting chains for the wheels this winter. Have a decent slope on part of the driveway and if there is an icy base the machine simply takes off down the driveway in a graceful often sideways slide. The stuff of stupid youtube vids but dangerous. I wear spikes if it's dicey and don't have a problem but the machine isn't as fortunate.

Starts easily but having the electric start is a nice backup.

Invest in the warmest waterproof mitts you can find.

 

Where in southern new hampshire?   My toro was repaired by Troy power sports even though they are a cub cadet dealer.  

Reasonably priced and they delivered it back to my house free of charge.  ( Course I live only a few miles away).

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Live in Spofford. Bought the snowblower in Keene at a dealer that closed shop. Used to get parts in Brattleboro but they no longer carry Toro equipment. Had Tuckers in Keene pick up and service  the blower and my John Deere tractor but they don't sell Toro or regularly stock Toro parts. Found a shop in Winchester that does.

Have heard good things about Troy Powersports.

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1 minute ago, redboat said:

Live in Spofford. Bought the snowblower in Keene at a dealer that closed shop. Used to get parts in Brattleboro but they no longer carry Toro equipment. Had Tuckers in Keene pick up and service  the blower and my John Deere tractor but they don't sell Toro or regularly stock Toro parts. Found a shop in Winchester that does.

Have heard good things about Troy Powersports.


Been to Markem in Keene a bunch of times on service calls

 

Thats is some harsh cold ass winter 

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12 minutes ago, tommays said:


Been to Markem in Keene a bunch of times on service calls

 

Thats is some harsh cold ass winter 

As someone who lives near keene(fitzwilliam). Harsh cold winter ha. More like mild winter.  Harsh cold winter is Buffalo or Oswego NY. (Lived near both)Tons of snow, tons of cold.  The mountains get cold but it stays relatively mild with light snow accumulation.  Major storms run out of steam before they get here.  

 

As for Troy power sports.  I dropped my snowblower off in Sept. And let them have it for a week.  They had to order parts as well.  I also have a paved flattish driveway, and store it in a garage.  So nothing back breaking.  Just the previous owner abused it.  Left outside uncovered 365. Etc.  

 

 

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6 hours ago, woodpecker said:

Ditto, I think my Honda is going on 15 years also. Starts first pull every time. I clear the roofs of my commercial buildings with it along with my driveways. Never had a problem with it.  Would not by one without tracks on it.
 

Almost all of the ski lifts here in Park City have a Honda with tracks on them.  Granted we probably get more snow than Maine but if you don't want to wrestle with your snowblower when the wheels slip, go Honda.  The only downer with a Honda with tracks is that it won't go forward without being on.  You can make it go backwards.

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Woody

1. that is not much of a driveway

2. that is not much snow

3. that is not really winter if you can wear shorts.  Have snapped the oil pump shaft on a toyota v6 from the cold after a storm.

 

When you have to do this same bs every morning before work with another 18 inches of snow for 3 weeks straight, that shoveling shit gets old.

and we will not even talk about old men who die of heart attacks from shoveling the wet stuff.

 

as I tell all my southern neighbors, "shoveling snow is highly overrated"

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9 hours ago, Foreverslow said:

Woody

1. that is not much of a driveway

2. that is not much snow

3. that is not really winter if you can wear shorts.  Have snapped the oil pump shaft on a toyota v6 from the cold after a storm.

 

When you have to do this same bs every morning before work with another 18 inches of snow for 3 weeks straight, that shoveling shit gets old.

and we will not even talk about old men who die of heart attacks from shoveling the wet stuff.

 

as I tell all my southern neighbors, "shoveling snow is highly overrated"

It was 1 and done for me

I used to go up for a PreSking party

Live the life for a week

= get drunk and spend day in Jacuzzi 

I wanted to leave something behind

The couch had 2 cup holders on each end

If I ever were to do that again I'd like to do a snow car smashed into/around a tree

PS I Hate snow I Hate Kold I Hate long pants

So I stay in DAGO

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20131209_070831.thumb.jpg.233ded4d7cbaacff606d69a57577ac00.jpgThis was my snow removal for 14 or 15 years. I did 10 driveways in my neighborhood and recued a few cars from the ditch each year as well.  Even with chains and water filled tires the traction wasn't enough to make more than a 20 foot pull of heavy snow. In the end I would do a 2-3 inch snow fall with the tractor, anything more than 3 inches I used a 2 stage 8or 9 hp snowblower.

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2 hours ago, warbird said:

20131209_070831.thumb.jpg.233ded4d7cbaacff606d69a57577ac00.jpgThis was my snow removal for 14 or 15 years. I did 10 driveways in my neighborhood and recued a few cars from the ditch each year as well.  Even with chains and water filled tires the traction wasn't enough to make more than a 20 foot pull of heavy snow. In the end I would do a 2-3 inch snow fall with the tractor, anything more than 3 inches I used a 2 stage 8or 9 hp snowblower.

Forgive my ignorance.  Am I correct in assuming you were pulling the snow with that rig?  If so, wouldn't a plow fitted to the front, been more efficient?  I sense the drive tires being on cleared surface might have more traction.

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59 minutes ago, ziggy said:

troybilt was the best you could buy in the 50s and 60s.

alas they are now a division of MTD.

They are built for a price.

if it were me, I would swap it for a Ariens or Toro and forgo the hassles in the future.

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Not a snow blower but I bought a no-frills Troy-Bilt mower about 15 years ago that was bulletproof. However, I made sure to get the model with a Honda engine and always ran ethanol-free gas and synthetic oil in it (post break-in, of course). There's not a hell of a lot can go wrong with a bare bones mower if the engine's right but a snow blower seems like a much more complicated beast. When you're doing a big chore in crappy weather, it's always nice to have good equipment to make it as fast and painless as possible under the circumstances.

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1 hour ago, Bus Driver said:

Forgive my ignorance.  Am I correct in assuming you were pulling the snow with that rig?  If so, wouldn't a plow fitted to the front, been more efficient?  I sense the drive tires being on cleared surface might have more traction.

You are correct, except. (there is always a qualifier) A. A three point hitch is designed for pulling and actually helps traction. B. A rig on the front would require a secondary hydraulic unit or modification to the existing and extensive fabrication or scrounging and this row crop tractor does not have the heavy duty front end to handle machinery loads. C. I have the pull blade. D. Except for a 12 volt conversion, a repaint 20 years ago and a tire or two, this tractor is the way my grandfather bought it new in 1963.

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On 12/3/2020 at 5:54 PM, sshow bob said:

Selma has suggested its time for a snowblower.  I am game.  Who has an opinion?

I need to clear two short driveways - both gravel.

What is this "snow" thing you speak of????

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3 hours ago, warbird said:

You are correct, except. (there is always a qualifier) A. A three point hitch is designed for pulling and actually helps traction. B. A rig on the front would require a secondary hydraulic unit or modification to the existing and extensive fabrication or scrounging and this row crop tractor does not have the heavy duty front end to handle machinery loads. C. I have the pull blade. D. Except for a 12 volt conversion, a repaint 20 years ago and a tire or two, this tractor is the way my grandfather bought it new in 1963.

Fair enough.  Thanks for the explanation.  Really cool it was your grandfather's.

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3 hours ago, warbird said:

You are correct, except. (there is always a qualifier) A. A three point hitch is designed for pulling and actually helps traction. B. A rig on the front would require a secondary hydraulic unit or modification to the existing and extensive fabrication or scrounging and this row crop tractor does not have the heavy duty front end to handle machinery loads. C. I have the pull blade. D. Except for a 12 volt conversion, a repaint 20 years ago and a tire or two, this tractor is the way my grandfather bought it new in 1963.

 

2 minutes ago, Bus Driver said:

Fair enough.  Thanks for the explanation.  Really cool it was your grandfather's.

The farm remains in the family, brother has done a very nice job remodeling, after my parents did a very nice job of remodeling, etc, etc. The prohibition era vault in the cellar is impressive.

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16 hours ago, warbird said:

You are correct, except. (there is always a qualifier) A. A three point hitch is designed for pulling and actually helps traction. B. A rig on the front would require a secondary hydraulic unit or modification to the existing and extensive fabrication or scrounging and this row crop tractor does not have the heavy duty front end to handle machinery loads. C. I have the pull blade. D. Except for a 12 volt conversion, a repaint 20 years ago and a tire or two, this tractor is the way my grandfather bought it new in 1963.

is that a ford tractor?

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6 minutes ago, warbird said:

Ford 2000,  1962 or 1963  IIRC

 

2 minutes ago, chester said:

our farm neighbours had one a little older, it was branded a fordson.  our yard tractor way back when was an AR

John Deere AR tractor photo

Wiki suggests Fordson was used till '64  in the UK.  Is it possible that tractor was an import?

Fordson was a brand name of tractors and trucks. It was used on a range of mass-produced general-purpose tractors manufactured by Henry Ford & Son Inc from 1917 to 1920, by Ford Motor Company (U.S.) and Ford Motor Company Ltd (U.K.) from 1920 to 1928, and by Ford Motor Company Ltd (U.K.) from 1929 to 1964. The latter (Ford of Britain) also later built trucks and vans under the Fordson brand.

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4 minutes ago, warbird said:

 

Wiki suggests Fordson was used till '64  in the UK.  Is it possible that tractor was an import?

Fordson was a brand name of tractors and trucks. It was used on a range of mass-produced general-purpose tractors manufactured by Henry Ford & Son Inc from 1917 to 1920, by Ford Motor Company (U.S.) and Ford Motor Company Ltd (U.K.) from 1920 to 1928, and by Ford Motor Company Ltd (U.K.) from 1929 to 1964. The latter (Ford of Britain) also later built trucks and vans under the Fordson brand.

more likely i just remember it wrong.  it was an older tractor but not 1920's old.  it looked quite like yours...probably a Ford.  the reason i remembered it here is that it had and they used the 3 point hitch with a blade.

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15 minutes ago, warbird said:

 

Wiki suggests Fordson was used till '64  in the UK.  Is it possible that tractor was an import?

Fordson was a brand name of tractors and trucks. It was used on a range of mass-produced general-purpose tractors manufactured by Henry Ford & Son Inc from 1917 to 1920, by Ford Motor Company (U.S.) and Ford Motor Company Ltd (U.K.) from 1920 to 1928, and by Ford Motor Company Ltd (U.K.) from 1929 to 1964. The latter (Ford of Britain) also later built trucks and vans under the Fordson brand.

 

8 minutes ago, chester said:

more likely i just remember it wrong.  it was an older tractor but not 1920's old.  it looked quite like yours...probably a Ford.  the reason i remembered it here is that it had and they used the 3 point hitch with a blade.

The blade swivels 180 so you can push backwards.  Reverse is only good for a few mph so you get no momentum. Those blades are common around here but a bobcat is very common on a farm now and much better for snow removal.

Call me an idiot but after suffering hard starting with the 6 volt system I retrofitted bulbs, ignition, battery and alternator for a 12 volt system about '96 or '97.  Great improvement but 0 degree F starting was a challenge. Slow turn over and an updraft carb (lifting the mixture up to the valve/cylinder) was still hit or miss. Then I learned the PTO was always engaged to the transmission and I had been starting with the clutch engaged thus spinning all of the transmission shafts and the PTO. Stepping on the clutch released all that drag on the starter motor and the engine would spin just fine.:lol:

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2 minutes ago, warbird said:

 

The blade swivels 180 so you can push backwards.  Reverse is only good for a few mph so you get no momentum. Those blades are common around here but a bobcat is very common on a farm now and much better for snow removal.

Call me an idiot but after suffering hard starting with the 6 volt system I retrofitted bulbs, ignition, battery and alternator for a 12 volt system about '96 or '97.  Great improvement but 0 degree F starting was a challenge. Slow turn over and an updraft carb (lifting the mixture up to the valve/cylinder) was still hit or miss. Then I learned the PTO was always engaged to the transmission and I had been starting with the clutch engaged thus spinning all of the transmission shafts and the PTO. Stepping on the clutch released all that drag on the starter motor and the engine would spin just fine.:lol:

live and learn!  :D

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On 12/5/2020 at 10:27 AM, warbird said:

You pretty much get what you pay for.  The big box store John Deere lines are different and cheaper than the John Deere dealership equipment.  I need a snowblower 5 or 6 times a year and my 20 (or more) year old "Snow King 8hp 26" does great, but I switched to a 20" single stage Toro or MTD 4 stroke 3 years ago. The little one is faster because turn around is instant.

Just got the little Torro 4 stroke.  Put it together and of course it is fucking 60 degrees..  Normal suburban driveway/sidewalk.  Had an electric SnowJoe which worked OK, The adds and reviews seemed to show that it could handle 10",(It would struggle in 5 and required multiple passes if the snow was wet.) so it would be excellent for someone with a big patio if weight is an issue. Grew up in Chicago with a couple hundred foot driveway, so I have some shoveling knowledge...  LOL

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1 minute ago, shaggy said:

Just got the little Torro 4 stroke.  Put it together and of course it is fucking 60 degrees..  Normal suburban driveway/sidewalk.  Had an electric SnowJoe which worked OK, The adds and reviews seemed to show that it could handle 10" (It would struggle in 5 and required multiple passes if the snow was wet.). Grew up in Chicago with a couple hundred foot driveway, so I have some shoveling knowledge...  LOL

Is that a single stage 4stroke?

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3 minutes ago, warbird said:

Is that a single stage 4stroke?

Yup, Got it a couple weeks ago on a pre black Friday deal.  1/2 off or something stupid... 

 https://www.acehardware.com/departments/lawn-and-garden/snow-removal-and-equipment/snow-blowers/7002860?store=12149&gclid=CjwKCAiAwrf-BRA9EiwAUWwKXrJflHrFf9ZqsjvsVdr0qlaOGdlw3WTfGG4cORFre_ifAs3Hy8I7SBoCkckQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

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6 minutes ago, shaggy said:

Yup, Got it a couple weeks ago on a pre black Friday deal.  1/2 off or something stupid...   

I got my 4 stroke single stage (cheapy MTD) used from the side of the road. Guy had 6 or 8 tuned up, cleaned up machines. The single stage will do 12 -14 inches slowly. Do a clean up pass then half passes. A 2 stage may move a little faster but muscling it around to come back is an exercise of shift gears and pulling it around. The single st