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1,900 containers into the Pacific


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Anyone sailing Northwest of Hawai'i had better be extra careful. 

The large container ship ONE Apus had a stack collapse and lost about 25% of her deck cargo overboard last week, about 1,900 containers.  Just like her sister ship ONE Aquila a month ago.

Come on, guys!  What's wrong with steel rigging frames between cells like most other big box ships have?  Sheesh.

ONE-Apus-3-Dec-2020-696x500.jpg

 

https://container-news.com/one-vessel-suffers-second-stack-collapse-in-a-month/

 

 

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9 minutes ago, Godzilla said:

Wonder what was in them?

Lots of electronics and large flat-screen TVs, all packed in styrofoam ready for the holiday sales.  Those containers float for ages.

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49 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

Re container support structures, if Maersk can do it, so can the others.

Maersk's largest boxships supplied with GE's fuel-efficient technology -  SAFETY4SEA

they are not container support structures , they are just walk ways across the ship so you can plug in reefers. the one ship has these to. also used for lashing purposes

 

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1 hour ago, Rum Monkey said:

they are not container support structures , they are just walk ways across the ship so you can plug in reefers. the one ship has these to. also used for lashing purposes

Interesting.  I always thought they were auxiliary lashing structures.  Happy to be corrected.

A stack of seven or eight boxes depending only on the structural integrity of the one at the bottom in a rolling seaway might be a recipe for a problem?

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4 hours ago, P_Wop said:

Anyone sailing Northwest of Hawai'i had better be extra careful. 

The large container ship ONE Apus had a stack collapse and lost about 25% of her deck cargo overboard last week, about 1,900 containers.  Just like her sister ship ONE Aquila a month ago.

Come on, guys!  What's wrong with steel rigging frames between cells like most other big box ships have?  Sheesh.

ONE-Apus-3-Dec-2020-696x500.jpg

https://container-news.com/one-vessel-suffers-second-stack-collapse-in-a-month/

Correct story link:

https://container-news.com/one-apus-may-have-lost-a-quarter-of-its-cargo/

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Well something isn't working out. Class societies have rules for the lashings. For instance ABS:
https://ww2.eagle.org/content/dam/eagle/rules-and-guides/current/equipment_and_component_certification/45-guide-certification-container-securing-systems/container-securing-guide-sept19.pdf

I haven't looked up this ship.

Update. Japan and NKK

 

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To my friends in Hawaii: I've been waiting since August for a new compressor for my (on warranty) GE beverage refrigerator. The part is coming from somewhere on the eastern side of the Pacific.  If you find one in a container that washed up on the beach, it's mine. You can keep the other stuff. 

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Here is a more detailed account of the current situation  and some details on the accident (over $50,000,000 in Cargo losses, lost 1,800 miles NW of Hawaii).... 

https://splash247.com/insurance-claims-from-one-apus-box-spill-set-to-top-50m/

The comments afterwards are interesting to read.

ONE Apus.jpg

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One would think the insurance companies would be getting sick of this shit by now.

From what I understand there are literally thousands of those thing dropped in the ocean every year

What is one container of stuff worth? Even filled with cheap shit it has to be worth serious money.

 

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20 hours ago, Snaggletooth said:

Alle 1,900 contanieres oue cunts, truly fackeng cunts I saye!

annual lost containers is ~1300.

So these quiz kids rolled up 18 months of worldwide loses all by themselves.

Brilliant!

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2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

One would think the insurance companies would be getting sick of this shit by now.

From what I understand there are literally thousands of those thing dropped in the ocean every year

What is one container of stuff worth? Even filled with cheap shit it has to be worth serious money.

 

They just up the premium a couple of $ for each container.

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1 hour ago, bridhb said:

They just up the premium a couple of $ for each container.

At $25K average, this latest loss is nearly $50,000,000 - that's a lot of $2 surcharges.

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22 hours ago, P_Wop said:

Lots of electronics and large flat-screen TVs, all packed in styrofoam ready for the holiday sales.  Those containers float for ages.

Forever, at least the Styrofoam part.  Right up until its in the piece of salmon you eat. 

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14 minutes ago, Rum Monkey said:

they havent lost 1900 containers over the side. 1900 containers have been affected. ie still on the ship but damaged. yes some will have gone but nowhere near 1900

Finally someone said it! The pic even shows heaps on the deck, 1900 gone and she would be empty!

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41 minutes ago, Turkey Slapper said:

Finally someone said it! The pic even shows heaps on the deck, 1900 gone and she would be empty!

She's a 14,000 TEO ship, so 7,000 40-foot boxes.  Figure 2,500 boxes below deck and 4,500 above.  Yes, I can believe a metric shed-load went over the side, perhaps not 1,900, but north of 1,000 anyway..

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22 hours ago, P_Wop said:

Interesting.  I always thought they were auxiliary lashing structures.  Happy to be corrected.

A stack of seven or eight boxes depending only on the structural integrity of the one at the bottom in a rolling seaway might be a recipe for a problem?

top 3to 4 teirs are normally empty  all the heavies down low and getting lighter towards the top. from above photo looks like 7 bays collapsed at 20 boxes wide by up to 8 high. still a shit load left on the decks and defintly way less than 1000 overboard

 

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It is amazing what low value cargo goes into containers. Sure a cargo of flat screen TV's or fancy french wine is expesive - but they also fill containers with bulk goods like dried beans!

19 hours ago, bridhb said:

They just up the premium a couple of $ for each container.

Exactly. 

2 hours ago, Grrr... said:

So what kind of fines do these assholes have to eat?

Nothing. You're in international waters and it's an accident at sea. Your flag state would be the best bet if such a law existed. 

It does seem that almost all of these incidents are winter, North Pacific - but that probably reflects mostly on where trade is flowing too. Great Circle Route is very far north. Yes most companies probably do some limited weather routing (mostly to save fuel) and captains can certainly download more weather data - but the pressure is always on the captain to do shortest route/least fuel.

image.thumb.png.a4ec5378c3eb32b94bee3931568836fb.png

 

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Just now, Zonker said:

It is amazing what low value cargo goes into containers. Sure a cargo of flat screen TV's or fancy french wine is expesive - but they also fill containers with bulk goods like dried beans!

Exactly. 

Nothing. You're in international waters and it's an accident at sea. Your flag state would be the best bet if such a law existed. 

It does seem that almost all of these incidents are winter, North Pacific - but that probably reflects mostly on where trade is flowing too. Great Circle Route is very far north. Yes most companies probably do some limited weather routing (mostly to save fuel) and captains can certainly download more weather data - but the pressure is always on the captain to do shortest route/least fuel.

image.thumb.png.a4ec5378c3eb32b94bee3931568836fb.png

 

Seems to me this is the kinda of shit that a country could REALLY use - if they went after these companies and convinced the rest of the world that something needed to be done.

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6 minutes ago, Zonker said:

It is amazing what low value cargo goes into containers. Sure a cargo of flat screen TV's or fancy french wine is expesive - but they also fill containers with bulk goods like dried beans!

I can see all the container ships that head into the ports of Seattle and Tacoma. As they pass, all I can think of are the Targets, Walmarts, and other stores consisting of aisle after aisle of cheap plastic junk designed for every possible use and that'll break in under a year. 

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Of course. They full of everything that's made Over There and bought Over Here. Still, think of the volume of container traffic consisting of nothing but cheap plastic widgets in blister packs. Too much consumption...

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1 hour ago, IStream said:

I can see all the container ships that head into the ports of Seattle and Tacoma. As they pass, all I can think of are the Targets, Walmarts, and other stores consisting of aisle after aisle of cheap plastic junk designed for every possible use and that'll break in under a year. 

Last weekend as I was driving through rural Conn I spied a Bridgeport strapped onto a big trailer. Made in Connecticut, lovingly moving somewhere in Connectocut so it can keep doing that.

Build local. Buy local.

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19 minutes ago, Turkey Slapper said:

Nope!

Let's wait to see the result of the investigation.  No mention or pics of losses from cells forward of the bridge.

What's your estimate of boxes lost overside?

Social media pictures show container carnage on ONE Apus | TradeWinds

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P-wop first info we had was 1600 damaged or lost, not 1600 lost, so the hype will be there, and the more its talked about the damaged content has seamed to be replaced by just lost!

 

In the 16 years ive been working on these ships, in Australia, except for the  APL England which dropped a few earlier in the year, ive never seen a lost container from a vessel we have worked, https://www.amsa.gov.au/news-community/campaigns/apl-england-container-loss after the fallen damaged ones were taken off, we had the job of discharging the whole ship of every box, it was inpounded here for a couple of weeks till amsa let it head out of australian waters for repair! Amsa here in Australia does a good job of pulling the shipping lines into line here in our waters, only yesterday, placing restrictions on a ships amount and placement of deck cargo due to ship condition, (rust, lack of maintenence ) the apl England was a rust bucket, the deck fitting mounts on deck, where the stacks are secured to the hatch covers were so badly rusted they let go, doing the same to the lashing points! (Yes facebook karens, they are strapped to the fucking ships not just sitting there)! The reports of the amsa recovery of the boxes off NSW was interesting reading and following! There was a reefer box washed up on Stradbroke island a while back, they are the best sealed boxes due to having frozen food in them when full so can float around for a while!

 

This is a plan of a ship, only the first page, there was still another 3 bays on the next oage, sure not as big as the one pictured above, but gives an idea of how many are below as well!

received_178474933951708.jpeg

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23 minutes ago, Turkey Slapper said:

P-wop first info we had was 1600 damaged or lost, not 1600 lost, so the hype will be there, and the more its talked about the damaged content has seamed to be replaced by just lost!

 

In the 16 years ive been working on these ships, in Australia, except for the  APL England which dropped a few earlier in the year, ive never seen a lost container from a vessel we have worked, https://www.amsa.gov.au/news-community/campaigns/apl-england-container-loss after the fallen damaged ones were taken off, we had the job of discharging the whole ship of every box, it was inpounded here for a couple of weeks till amsa let it head out of australian waters for repair! Amsa here in Australia does a good job of pulling the shipping lines into line here in our waters, only yesterday, placing restrictions on a ships amount and placement of deck cargo due to ship condition, (rust, lack of maintenence ) the apl England was a rust bucket, the deck fitting mounts on deck, where the stacks are secured to the hatch covers were so badly rusted they let go, doing the same to the lashing points! (Yes facebook karens, they are strapped to the fucking ships not just sitting there)! The reports of the amsa recovery of the boxes off NSW was interesting reading and following! There was a reefer box washed up on Stradbroke island a while back, they are the best sealed boxes due to having frozen food in them when full so can float around for a while!

 

This is a plan of a ship, only the first page, there was still another 3 bays on the next oage, sure not as big as the one pictured above, but gives an idea of how many are below as well!

 

Thanks for the info - very enlightening.  I defer to your superior knowledge and expertise.

My only experience was in the 80s when I took the Papua New Guinea Admirals Cup boats back from France to Port Moresby.  The ship had mixed cargo for the Pacific Islands, and a lot of containers.  Our boats were tucked into an upper tween deck with loads of dunnage and wires, and the cradles welded to the lower tween deck hatch covers.

Most of the containers were on deck. I was impressed with the maze of criss-cross wire lashings on the ends, which took the deck crew several days after departure to finish.  I'm not sure if that is still de riguer or do you mainly depend on the twistlocks??

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From the linked article,

"A schedule recovery plan is now being formulated said the company and will be advised to customers shortly."

Are they really going to attempt to recover all those containers??

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6 hours ago, P_Wop said:

Let's wait to see the result of the investigation.  No mention or pics of losses from cells forward of the bridge.

What's your estimate of boxes lost overside?

Social media pictures show container carnage on ONE Apus | TradeWinds

There's over 100 containers just in that front row.

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Kust to put ths in perspective. Late 90s a big ship was 5000 TEU and research was focusing on the proposed 8000 TEU post Panamax size.

We are now at over 21000 TEU. Thats 10500 forty footers.

There are a lot of boxes in these ships!

The misconception that much much more on deck is based on optical illision. Also the wingwalls are ridicuclously narroes. The terracing is optimized to minimize lost soace. 30 uears ago we were using NAPA and writing optimizations on it to fo thar. It is only even more refined now.

Jave the class rules kept up?

Do they ever? (Loaded question...they sure get more complicated!!!)

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On 12/5/2020 at 11:46 PM, Godzilla said:

1900 that’s an impressive number. Especially when you multiply by two.

Wonder what was in them?

Scary part is with COVID-19 shortages TP , masks , gloves, and all to Medication and auto parts problems this does not help supplies the USA with what’s needed.

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Somebody upthread wascwondering about lashing. Theres morecthan one method.

Way back when I was designing these ships the tipic was always, lashbridge or not?

Macgregor has been selling their own versions for long time. Search lashing bridgr youll see

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My Dad worked for a company named LINEFAST after he retired from his US Navy career. LINEFAST made the twistlocks that are used to stack containers. They also built the cranes for loading and unloading the containers. The company must have been bought or conglomerated because I can't find anything on it using Google. I did find this which was the largest when built

MSC_G%C3%9CLS%C3%9CN_%2848675118678%29_%28cropped%29.jpg

 

The ONE sure looks bigger

Mv_ONE_Grus.png

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36 minutes ago, fastyacht said:

Somebody upthread wascwondering about lashing. Theres morecthan one method.

Way back when I was designing these ships the tipic was always, lashbridge or not?

Macgregor has been selling their own versions for long time. Search lashing bridgr youll see

OK, now what?

Lash Bridge - My Lash Store

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1 hour ago, Rum Monkey said:

would of hated to be on board when the wave hit that

 

I would have been an interesting day!

One thing I've noticed is that the ship is level after the cargo shift, so that implies ballasting was done at some stage.

I wonder if they had to shift ballast during the storm?  That could have been interesting.

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13 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

My Dad worked for a company named LINEFAST after he retired from his US Navy career. LINEFAST made the twistlocks that are used to stack containers. They also built the cranes for loading and unloading the containers. The company must have been bought or conglomerated because I can't find anything on it using Google. I did find this which was the largest when built

MSC_G%C3%9CLS%C3%9CN_%2848675118678%29_%28cropped%29.jpg

 

The ONE sure looks bigger

Mv_ONE_Grus.png

Your eyes betray you. Gülsün Capacity: 23,756 TEU. One Apus is 14,000TEU.

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The shipowners of ONE Apus confirmed today that of the 1,816 containers lost overboard during severe weather on Nov. 30, 64 of them contained dangerous goods. Of the containers with dangerous goods, 54 were carrying fireworks, 8 were carrying batteries, and 2 liquid alcohol.

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Must have been one hell of a ride and a bit of a gamble by the company and captain trying to get the product delivered ASAP.  Especially with all the weather routing info available.  

Does anyone know if some organization tracks the lost containers and plots anticipated drift patterns and issues something like a notice to mariners?   

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You might get a NTM for the initial event in coastal waters but nobody tracks them on a consistent basis.

Just did the calculation. 40' box has a maximum gross weight of about 30.5 Tonnes (varies with if it is going by truck, rail etc, and with locale). Illegally overweight containers are a thing however.

The volume of the box is about 77 m3. So in salt water a SEALED, fully laden container should be floating with at least half it's height visible. If it's full of light stuff like plush Santas for Xmas, it will be lighter and thus float higher.

Door seals are not made to withstand a head of water (I think) and eventually the box will take on more water and get lower in the water and may eventually sink. Or door seals may not be in great shape and they will leak as well.

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From a customer perspective, ocean freight lines are right behind the railroads in terms of having a monopolistic way of doing business. Maybe they are worse, because they have figured out how to harness the internet to shift all the bureaucratic hassles of the process to their customers, while they invoice for every facet of the process, and hide behind a cartel-like tariff schedule. It probably costs less to move a container of tennis shoes from Shanghai to the US west coast than to truck it east to west coast. But I'd sure as hell rather deal with a trucking company.

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Yes, exactly, though container on a single truck is not very economical versus 10,000 on a ship.

I was looking into short haul freight by sea to avoid the I-95 corridor around 1998. Boston to Florida.

Moving a container in a dockyard was $150. That is "unload from a delivery truck to the ground while waiting for the ship".

Then ship arrives. "pick up container and move it aboard the ship (drop trailer)".  Another $150.

Ship sails (Boston to Florida) $500 / container

"unload from ship and put in the yard"  $150

"pick it up and put it on a truck" $150

So the 4 movements on the shore side cost more than the actual shipping cost. The Longshoreman's union is a powerful one and drives freight costs up like you can't imagine.

LA Time story, 2015:

"About half of West Coast union longshoremen make more than $100,000 a year — some much more, according to shipping industry data. More than half of foremen and managers earn more than $200,000 each year. A few bosses make more than $300,000. All get free healthcare."

 

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^^ both of these. And on top of that, if you are importing or exporting, you have another whole set of bureaucratic hoops to jump through. Even if you are shipping say a container or two a month as part of a larger business, unless you are doing this sort of thing every day you probably outsource the work to others to avoid little mistakes that can lead to big costs. Which just adds another layer of $150-$300 charges to the bills.

The system has been developed into a "big business - big government" affair that doesn't need to be as bloated as it is.  And mickey-mouse government bullshit like having 15-digit passwords that cannot contain any words and must be changed every 60 days. It's not like we are protecting nuclear secrets - it's entering commercial data, for Pete's sake.

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I wonder if anyone's looked at installing some sort of locator beacon on a random sample of boxes on a ship? 

a couple in each stack near the outside... at least you could track a couple of em and issue notice to mariners with projected drift...

 

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1 hour ago, Zonker said:

LA Time story, 2015:

"About half of West Coast union longshoremen make more than $100,000 a year — some much more, according to shipping industry data. More than half of foremen and managers earn more than $200,000 each year. A few bosses make more than $300,000. All get free healthcare."

 

I knew some local longshoremen back in the early 70's. They made fantastic money once they were in the union.

In 1973 their rates were $9/Hr for days, $18/Hr for evenings and $27/Hr for nights.

Needless to say all the union guys took the night shifts and the guys on the other "boards" worked the other shifts.

They worked when they wanted - when they showed up they got 1st pick of work. They lived very well - guys in their 20's paying cash for new Corvettes & matching muscle boats. A group of them spent the summers in the Okanagan with their boats so 4 of them bought a house there for the summers and rented it out the rest of the time.

$27/Hr then was huge money - I was a senior computer operator at IBM and I made around $4/Hr.

Hell, $27/Hr now isn't exactly starvation wages.

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On 12/8/2020 at 9:06 PM, fastyacht said:

thats a non-zero number one

1607421258179.jpg

Wow, i may stand corrected, that pic shows a way different perspective than the original pics, there could be the rumored amount lost after all that the media outlet reported!! Not just damaged, thats wild! 

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On 12/7/2020 at 12:47 PM, Zonker said:

I bet they're also full of auto parts, tools, shackles, shelving, musical instruments, rolls of fabric, and everything else you can think of.

 

And cleverly designed sailboats that fit into those boxes for fast and safe shipment worldwide!  
 

Plus dinghies, marine parts, spars, sails, etc etc....

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8 hours ago, Whinging Pom said:

Picked up this video from another forum on why container ships are so prone to parametric rolling.   Ship rolling to 45 degrees!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QEw6fKZTpzc

 

 

Excellent video, thanks for the post.

Here's the G-Captain write-up on the loss: https://gcaptain.com/one-apus-arrives-in-kobe-revealing-cargo-loss-of-epic-proportions/?fbclid=IwAR0_bsmxYF_1pUXNaUzuk1llbFXJP4RyEuNu_SSCJDq35JjmUUdIal6lgdY

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23 hours ago, Zonker said:

Yes, exactly, though container on a single truck is not very economical versus 10,000 on a ship.

I was looking into short haul freight by sea to avoid the I-95 corridor around 1998. Boston to Florida.

Moving a container in a dockyard was $150. That is "unload from a delivery truck to the ground while waiting for the ship".

Then ship arrives. "pick up container and move it aboard the ship (drop trailer)".  Another $150.

Ship sails (Boston to Florida) $500 / container

"unload from ship and put in the yard"  $150

"pick it up and put it on a truck" $150

So the 4 movements on the shore side cost more than the actual shipping cost. The Longshoreman's union is a powerful one and drives freight costs up like you can't imagine.

LA Time story, 2015:

"About half of West Coast union longshoremen make more than $100,000 a year — some much more, according to shipping industry data. More than half of foremen and managers earn more than $200,000 each year. A few bosses make more than $300,000. All get free healthcare."

 

Not only do they make a killing but they don't generally do any work, either.

They generally just pay the Pilipino crews a few bucks to do their job for them on the way out of the harbour.

A couple weeks ago some crew refused to do the job for them here in Vancouver: Longshoremen who had their bribe denied just falsely reported the vessel isn't secured properly, traffic tells the vessel they can't leave, Transport Canada investigator takes 6 hours to get there, pilot leaves, major delay and major $$$. Captain sounded like he was in tears on the radio.

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11 hours ago, Whinging Pom said:

Picked up this video from another forum on why container ships are so prone to parametric rolling.   Ship rolling to 45 degrees!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QEw6fKZTpzc

Good video.  Thanks for posting.  Parametric rolling in a head sea, who would have thunk it?  But it looks fast and nasty, and might also explain the end of the Faro disaster.

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Here's another video, showing a containership rockin' and rollin' coming into Limon. If they waves have the right (wrong?) frequency and direction, they don't need to be especially big to make things very uncomfortable.

 

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On 12/6/2020 at 9:58 PM, Rum Monkey said:

they havent lost 1900 containers over the side. 1900 containers have been affected. ie still on the ship but damaged. yes some will have gone but nowhere near 1900

g captain report says they lost 1800 contains overboard:

Chidori Ship Holding LLC as owners and NYK Shipmanagement Pte Ltd as managers of the container vessel ONE Apus (IMO# 9806079) can confirm that the ship is now safely berthed in the Port of Kobe after losing 1,816 containers overboard when it encountered severe weather on Monday, November 30, 2020,” the latest update said.

 

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5 hours ago, krikkitman said:

Here's another video, showing a containership rockin' and rollin' coming into Limon. If they waves have the right (wrong?) frequency and direction, they don't need to be especially big to make things very uncomfortable.

 

12 second period! Which is typical for ships in the range of 1500 LT displacement or so. Not whatever that is. Excessive stability.

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20 hours ago, Amati said:

And cleverly designed sailboats that fit into those boxes for fast and safe shipment worldwide!  
 

Plus dinghies, marine parts, spars, sails, etc etc....

That’s how my Fareast28R got here!