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5 years till retirement


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WTF?  It's slowly sinking in that in 5 years I will probably retire and the year after my spose will too.  Cruising the warm waters in the winter is in the cards.  While looking at boats the other day, my spose was enamored with the Kelly Peterson 46.....I was too.

so we put together a short list (not too much research yet)

KP46

Nordic 44

Rustler 42 ( may be hard to find in the USA as it;s a British boat)

Passport 40

Tartan 40

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13 minutes ago, bmiller said:

I spend a ton of time dreaming, then the reality of a budget slaps me in the face.

That should at least be somewhere in the dream process.

Champagne taste on a beer budget describes me perfectly.

This would do it.

https://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/89137

main.jpg

 

exactly....................what a great cruiser of a boat.

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Don't overlook the Peterson 44 - the original that the KP 46 was more or less splashed from.

They have an outstanding rep.

Back when they were pretty new I was walking the docks with a non-sailing friend when we came across one. He stopped in his tracks and said "Now that's a yacht".

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If we are looking at the warm waters of the Bahamas almost any boat will do. Pretty much the same for the Eastern Caribbean, just harder to get to. A modern, comfortable boat like a Catalina or Beneteau would be fine. If the warm waters of the Pacific or Indian it gets more complicated and expensive. We have a Catalina 36 MkII now and it would be very good for Eastern Caribbean and the open transom would be very nice to have. Would I want to take it across the Indian Ocean from Indonesia to South Africa, with weeks of winds 25 to 35 knots? No, not really although I am sure people have done it. Our Bristol 45.5 was wonderful in those power reaching conditions. Different boats for different floats (and budgets). I am partial to the newer Bristols for extended cruising and they come in all sizes from 29.9 to 68.8.

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Whichever boat it is, remember to take aging into account.  That is, you guys aging.  Spoil yourself with easy sailing.  I've seen so many friends sell their sailboat when they reach their late 60s because it's just too much work. 

And keep the exterior teak to a bare minimum.  None would be best for tropical climes.

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2 hours ago, dacapo said:

WTF?  It's slowly sinking in that in 5 years I will probably retire and the year after my spose will too.  Cruising the warm waters in the winter is in the cards.  While looking at boats the other day, my spose was enamored with the Kelly Peterson 46.....I was too.

so we put together a short list (not too much research yet)

KP46

Nordic 44

Rustler 42 ( may be hard to find in the USA as it;s a British boat)

Passport 40

Tartan 40

Not a moment too soon. The world is going to shit and you don't need to be a part of that. Get your boat and go.

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3 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Not a moment too soon. The world is going to shit and you don't need to be a part of that. Get your boat and go.

we are aware.............

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We don't need no stinkin' insurance. I wonder if in 5yrs it will be close to unobtanium for a double-handed couple offshore?

Given increasing decrepitude, where do you cut the line with size? 

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43 minutes ago, Elegua said:

We don't need no stinkin' insurance. I wonder if in 5yrs it will be close to unobtanium for a double-handed couple offshore?

Given increasing decrepitude, where do you cut the line with size? 

Fit electric winches, they really extend your options as you age.

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57 minutes ago, Elegua said:

We don't need no stinkin' insurance. I wonder if in 5yrs it will be close to unobtanium for a double-handed couple offshore?

Given increasing decrepitude, where do you cut the line with size? 

I'm going to say 30,000 pounds displacement. I know couples cruising bigger, but if you can't find enough room for 2 in 30,000 pounds, you're even more spoiled than me. 

 

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We're still pushing around a 61' boat with electric winches.  It's all doable if you think ahead.  Coming down this season we were very happy to have as much waterline as we did.  

You're gonna love being retired.

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14 minutes ago, olaf hart said:

Fit electric winches, they really extend your options as you age.

This.

I have an online store, in which I put just a few items or products that are a little "different" just to drive some traffic into my main sites, one of them (the Ewincher) I saw at METS a few years back and I've been selling it for three seasons, but I only tested it for real a couple of months ago with a client that wanted to see how it worked. And I must say we were both very surprised. 

The guy made his wife hoist him (105kg) all the way up his mast (47 footer boat) with the Ewincher and she did it with no effort at all on one of the mast winches (not the big ones on the cockpit). I have video but I'm probably not allowed to post it.

This guy retired recently and bought a Northwind 47 yacht only to realize that it was a LOT of work to manage. He bought it and so did his neighbor boat. 

 I guess when you reach a certain age you either get a new, smaller boat, electrify your winches (thousands of dollars), you hire crew or you buy one of these.

 

 

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49 minutes ago, olaf hart said:

Fit electric winches, they really extend your options as you age.

Funny, I just ordered a Muir HR1600 anchor winch yesterday. And contemplating a powered winch for my mainsail halyard...

FKT

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1 hour ago, Bryanjb said:

We're still pushing around a 61' boat with electric winches.  It's all doable if you think ahead.  Coming down this season we were very happy to have as much waterline as we did. 

But you have a girl that will go up a 75' mast.

Not all of us are that lucky. :D

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1 hour ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I'm going to say 30,000 pounds displacement. I know couples cruising bigger, but if you can't find enough room for 2 in 30,000 pounds, you're even more spoiled than me. 

 

That's around what I was thinking - and that's the right measure, too. You can get bigger winches but that won't help you carry a mainsail.  I'm not saying it can't be done, but it might limit the time you have or make you a little more reliant on help. 

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3 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Funny, I just ordered a Muir HR1600 anchor winch yesterday. And contemplating a powered winch for my mainsail halyard...

FKT

Ya need to learn from that crazy Australian, Trevor R.
 

Amazingly, Iron Bark II had no anchor windlass. Trevor routinely pulls in up to 90 meters (295 feet) of chain hand over hand because he considers a windlass “too slow”!”

https://atomvoyages.com/articles/sailor-interviews/105-iceman.html

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1 hour ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Ya need to learn from that crazy Australian, Trevor R.
 

Amazingly, Iron Bark II had no anchor windlass. Trevor routinely pulls in up to 90 meters (295 feet) of chain hand over hand because he considers a windlass “too slow”!”

https://atomvoyages.com/articles/sailor-interviews/105-iceman.html

Yeah. What he does is his business. 

You can buy faster & more powerful winches but you can't buy a younger body with better working joints. You can rent one of course but then I'd have to cater for the whims of crew and that wouldn't work out well at all.

And I'm willing to bet he's not doing that in even 15 knots of wind on the nose, let alone 30. At least I'd like to see the video before I believed it.

FKT

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1 hour ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Yeah. What he does is his business. 

You can buy faster & more powerful winches but you can't buy a younger body with better working joints. You can rent one of course but then I'd have to cater for the whims of crew and that wouldn't work out well at all.

And I'm willing to bet he's not doing that in even 15 knots of wind on the nose, let alone 30. At least I'd like to see the video before I believed it.

FKT

That’s an article by someone who met him back then, 20-oak yrs ago, recently returned from Antarctica, who saw that he had no windlass.  He recently sold his boat, vowing not to own it past age 70...and indeed it had a windlass by then, as well as a jib furler.  See http://iron-bark.blogspot.com/2019/08/iron-bark-is-for-sale.html?m=1

 

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37 minutes ago, Priscilla said:

Transom platform like this would be high on my list of priorities.

Getting on and off the boat easily is not to be underrated when considering a retirement yacht.

aimg0104.jpg.d7a3f5dc53f6233e34bd9c19f3ecb61e.jpg

 

Provided that it's flat calm of course. Otherwise, good luck with that and I hope you've got either a very robust dinghy, or a spare.

FKT

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5 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

That’s an article by someone who met him back then, 20-oak yrs ago, recently returned from Antarctica, who saw that he had no windlass.  He recently sold his boat, vowing not to own it past age 70...and indeed it had a windlass by then, as well as a jib furler.  See http://iron-bark.blogspot.com/2019/08/iron-bark-is-for-sale.html?m=1

 

Hanging it up at 70? I guess he's been everywhere he wants to go so fair enough. 70 is far too close on the horizon for my liking, no plans to stop sailing myself. Friend of mine is still sailing pretty much every week and he's 85. Doesn't go as far as he did but he doesn't plan on giving it up either.

I built jib furling gear for my boat. The manual windlass is slated for replacement in January. Main halyard winch might go to a powered one too. Looking at motors et al ATM.

It's not so much that I need this gear as much as I'm bone idle and like playing with stuff. That's not for everyone of course.

FKT

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4 minutes ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Provided that it's flat calm of course. Otherwise, good luck with that and I hope you've got either a very robust dinghy, or a spare.

FKT

Looks hard to get out of a dinghy onto a platform like that.  In fact, I saw someone struggle out of an inflatable onto a transom platform like that last summer on a smaller boat.  (Looked like a great idea until I saw someone actually try it.). Seems easier to climb, step up steps or a ladder, than to climb onto something flat, with little to hold on to.

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4 minutes ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Hanging it up at 70? I guess he's been everywhere he wants to go so fair enough. 70 is far too close on the horizon for my liking, no plans to stop sailing myself. Friend of mine is still sailing pretty much every week and he's 85. Doesn't go as far as he did but he doesn't plan on giving it up either.

I built jib furling gear for my boat. The manual windlass is slated for replacement in January. Main halyard winch might go to a powered one too. Looking at motors et al ATM.

It's not so much that I need this gear as much as I'm bone idle and like playing with stuff. That's not for everyone of course.

FKT

No, he sold the steel boat he built 20 years previously, having been everywhere from Antarctica to Greenland and places in between, not wanting the steel maintenance past 70, he says.  He just bought a fiberglass boat for less epic voyages. See http://iron-bark.blogspot.com/2020/10/confined-to-port-by-quarantine-along.html?m=1

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Just now, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Looks hard to get out of a dinghy onto a platform like that.  In fact, I saw someone struggle out of an inflatable onto a transom platform like that last summer on a smaller boat.  (Looked like a great idea until I saw someone actually try it.). Seems easier to climb, step up steps or a ladder, than to climb onto something flat, with little to hold on to.

I mis-spent a few years in my 20's doing fish catch monitoring in the Arafura Sea. We did a *lot* of small boat work going from the mothership to boarding fishing vessels and back. I loathe stern boarding setups, they're downright dangerous in anything other than a flat calm. Whenever I see people thinking they're a good idea I figure they never do boardings in any sort of seaway.

We do all personnel transfer and stores loading at the midships gate point then I take the dinghy around to the stern and climb the transom ladder then hoist the dinghy in its davits. Best I could come up with for my hull.

FKT

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1 minute ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

No, he sold the steel boat he built 20 years previously, having been everywhere from Antarctica to Greenland and places in between, not wanting the steel maintenance past 70, he says.  He just bought a fiberglass boat for less epic voyages. See http://iron-bark.blogspot.com/2020/10/confined-to-port-by-quarantine-along.html?m=1

Yeah fair enough, you change your needs as circumstances/health changes.

5 years until retirement can go by awfully fast. Who would ever have predicted how 2020 turned out.

FKT

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I have something similar to that eWincher.  Called the WinchRite.  Same deal.  Was about $790 or so.  What most people don't understand is every action has an opposite reaction.  When you power up the handheld electric winch, the force used to turn the winch is transmitted to the handle and it can get away from you.  My kids and parents are both scared of it and refuse to use it.  I place my knee on it to keep it from getting away from me. 

They work a treat but they can surprise you. 

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2 hours ago, Beer fueled Mayhem said:

I have something similar to that eWincher.  Called the WinchRite.  Same deal.  Was about $790 or so.  What most people don't understand is every action has an opposite reaction.  When you power up the handheld electric winch, the force used to turn the winch is transmitted to the handle and it can get away from you.  My kids and parents are both scared of it and refuse to use it.  I place my knee on it to keep it from getting away from me. 

They work a treat but they can surprise you. 

Correct, I haven't used the Winchrite but my client had (and didn't work for him due to the horrible ergonomy) However, you don't have this problem with Ewincher if you use this little trick:  just use a strop from a fixed point near the winch to the winch handle and you only have to push the button.

Ewincher is a lot more sofisticated (and expensive, it's over €2k) than Winchrite. Expensive but much cheaper than electrifying one or more winches on board...

 

 

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it's good to know that me and my spose are still rather young (50) and in fine sailing shape (round is a shape ;-) )   I still think having an electric main halyard winch is a necessity ...along with lazy jacks and a stack pack

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I find that boarding amidships, where the boat is pivoting is the safest method of boarding from a dinghy. Boarding at the stern, when the boat is horsing around is risky work even with sugar scoops and garage doors.

All you need to do, is buy or build the boarding ladder that works best for you in terms of how it attaches to the boat and how it interfaces with your dinghy to allow easy stepping up. I have a Plastimo "fender/ladder."  It's a squishy fender that looks like an ice cube tray. I clip it to the slotted toe rail. I'm going to test an alternative made from PVC. It's a simple step made of a grid with non-skid strips on the tubes.

Regular walks, hikes and stretching exercises along with a healthy diet that includes adequate calcium will ensure that you have the strength and flexibility to climb up well into your advanced years.

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12 minutes ago, Matagi said:

Moody 44, maybe?

826456.jpg

first impressions are   the Nordic 44 looks faster ;-)  and the KP 44/46 look nicer (aesthetically)  as center cockpits....but it's within what we think may be our price range...PS I fucking hate in mast furling mains ... 

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7 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:
8 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Looks hard to get out of a dinghy onto a platform like that.  In fact, I saw someone struggle out of an inflatable onto a transom platform like that last summer on a smaller boat.  (Looked like a great idea until I saw someone actually try it.). Seems easier to climb, step up steps or a ladder, than to climb onto something flat, with little to hold on to.

I mis-spent a few years in my 20's doing fish catch monitoring in the Arafura Sea. We did a *lot* of small boat work going from the mothership to boarding fishing vessels and back. I loathe stern boarding setups, they're downright dangerous in anything other than a flat calm. Whenever I see people thinking they're a good idea I figure they never do boardings in any sort of seaway.

We do all personnel transfer and stores loading at the midships gate point then I take the dinghy around to the stern and climb the transom ladder then hoist the dinghy in its davits. Best I could come up with for my hull.

Yes and no.

Wide-ass modern boats have their center of rotation -much- further after, so it's not as bad as you think.

Ideally, a gate and a water-level platform at the center of rotation would be nice. But it's difficult to implement and would take a chunk out of the most useful part of the boat. I helped a friend build a folding step that would lock in place at his midship gate, but it was actually forward of the boats' center of rotation and it was a bitch to stow.

A lot of boats are rally very difficult to get on/off at the dock, much less from the water. People like to kid themselves about what's easy.

FB- Doug

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9 hours ago, Priscilla said:

Transom platform like this would be high on my list of priorities.

Getting on and off the boat easily is not to be underrated when considering a retirement yacht.

aimg0104.jpg.d7a3f5dc53f6233e34bd9c19f3ecb61e.jpg

 

Did a delivery of one for a member here. The electric winches made hoisting and trimming the main a breeze!

Did not use the transom for disembarking or boarding to a launch, as it would require stepping over the gunwale and down onto the platform with no tie up for the launch or handhold for the crew. However, for lounging and launching kayaks, the platform is great.

I’m going to have to break down and get a powered winch handle for my 46’, the main is 48’ luff and 19’ foot and 9 1/2oz Dacron cruising cloth. It wore me out last year raising that sail:( and I’m only early 50’s

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9 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Yeah fair enough, you change your needs as circumstances/health changes.

5 years until retirement can go by awfully fast. Who would ever have predicted how 2020 turned out.

FKT

Absolutely — Trevor appears to be superhuman anyway (who could spend 13 months in Antarctica, solo?).

BTW, I’m going to PM you with a question about my anchor roller set up (a fabrication question, since you’ve built a boat - you seem like the person to ask).  Hope you don’t mind.

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29 minutes ago, Bryanjb said:

I don't know if you can board midship on some of the newer designs, they have towering freeboard.

No problem stepping up through the gate stanchions from a launch, however, you need a couple of steps to climb up when there is a high tide on the dock

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1 hour ago, olaf hart said:

Redneck boarding ladder

 

F293BF92-C6A6-4270-954E-EE9E9E7F9428.jpeg

DA73A364-73BC-40C4-9007-73FB621EFC5C.jpeg

I've got a fender step - basically looks like a banana on its side. Works really well but my boat does have pretty low freeboard.

There's a rope/plastic rung ladder stowed below which is necessary for getting out of the water as I don't have sufficient upper body strength to chin myself up any more. I strongly recommend never falling off of a ladder and totally smashing an elbow joint. Fracturing a hip is trivial in comparison and I managed to do both at the same time.

Mind you rolling into the dinghy while it's on its davit falls works if you have to. Been there done that.

FKT

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4 hours ago, Ajax said:

Some CC boats look like a wedding cake. Sunflower looks sleek by comparison. I like that.

IMO, THE best looking CC boat ever was the Stevens 47. It was a little "prettier" or more feminine looking the the Norseman, which to my eye is a very masculine looking boat..

Had the downside of low, kidney killer cockpit coamings to get that sleek cabin top.

image.png.ade02f0f629d882bb4a37d17c15cdec9.png

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5 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Damn those Grampians were ugly. Any bride who got a wedding cake that ugly would be entitled to an annulment.

I always thought Grampian sounded like a kind of sea monster.  Or an dowdy old Grandpa.  Or a Grampus, one of those bluntnose dolphins.  Not svelte.  Like the Grampian sailboat.

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I can’t see us spending more than 150,000  +/-  and I’d be looking closer to 100,000 and if it needed some work prior to leaving for a few years I can do that. 

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