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Borax Johnson

Flooded kitchen anarchy - episode 1 (AKA what kind of floor to get)

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Dishwasher had a leak sinceMay when (apparently) the LG guy didn't get the supply line tight. Drip drip drip for 5 months+.

Getting about 95% of the floor redone - it was all Formica fake wood. I know we will get a budget to match what we had. So, the question is:

Given what we had, what are our potions? I have been told "high end waterproof vinyl wood"(?!?).

What is the 2020 Info for the US - California in particular, because our Governor doesn't need a legislature. Just a pen (no PA jab there, just frustration).

Two more related posts coming soon.....

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I feel your pain.  I cut 8-10 inches out of my daughters base cabinet bottoms last week.  She had a connection fail under the sink.  We built plywood base pieces to screw into the remaining still dry particle board.  I never thought I would know how to fix kitchen cabinets.

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i Had a utility room floor done in laminate wood but the pieces glued together not click. seems are tight. stands up very well to water. The click together stuff no matter what they say, doesn't like water very much. The really discounted stuff at big box hardware stores is shit. if ya want something to last more than a couple years in a laminate, yer gonna need to spend close to $2/sqft. or more. 

I did my bathroom floors in this house with woodlook ceramic tile that I really like. it has texture, so is very non-skid, a characteristic that I rather like in a kitchen as well. When I get around to the kitchen here I'll use the same stuff. 

 

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Can you recommend specific brand, model?   Sorry just starting to consider replacement of kitchen, laundry and bathroom floor that is on cement slab.  Then a full bathroom on plywood.  

 

Thanks 

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6 hours ago, Kent H said:

Can you recommend specific brand, model?   Sorry just starting to consider replacement of kitchen, laundry and bathroom floor that is on cement slab.  Then a full bathroom on plywood.  

 

Thanks 

Look at CoreTec

https://coretecfloors.com/en-us?gclid=Cj0KCQiA8dH-BRD_ARIsAC24umbihhx8FQSq9TO4Sg6BVfDclxSBfrWQPGtvHxEUsuPwwxWWVKdS_kMaAsKdEALw_wcB

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it seems all flooring now is wood, tile or engineered material that LOOKS like wood or tile.  i have used https://www.armstrongflooring.com/commercial/en-us/products/vinyl-composition-tile.html VCT tile in kitchens, halls, stairs and basements over 2 houses and 30 years. It is very affordable, very tough and impervious to water.  you can get fancy with designs and there are a large number of colours and patterns.

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I was able to buy traditional oak flooring.  It was a job to lay down, but the polyurethane finish makes it free from water stains. 

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We just finished redoing the floors in two bathrooms and went with "luxury vinyl plank". It looks good, holds up to water well, and is comfortable. The last part is important since we do not use shoes in the house so the fact that it has a little give to it and some insulating properties is nice. Wood is better looking, and tile is more durable, but both are a lot more expensive especially when you include installation. If money was not an issue we would have gone with tile over a heated floor. We have heated tile in our master bath and it is strange how the heat makes tile feel softer.

In regards to brands there are so many it is hard to choose. We decided to go with a dedicated higher end flooring store. They don't stock junk, and they knew their product lines well. The added cost over the big box hardware store was worth it.

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16 hours ago, Borax Johnson said:

Dishwasher had a leak sinceMay when (apparently) the LG guy didn't get the supply line tight. Drip drip drip for 5 months+.

Getting about 95% of the floor redone - it was all Formica fake wood. I know we will get a budget to match what we had. So, the question is:

Given what we had, what are our potions? I have been told "high end waterproof vinyl wood"(?!?).

What is the 2020 Info for the US - California in particular, because our Governor doesn't need a legislature. Just a pen (no PA jab there, just frustration).

Two more related posts coming soon.....

Kitchen, recommend a ceramic tile. Some of the underlayments they have if you're on a raised foundation are pretty good as far as water goes. Some ceramic tiles have a real wood look and feel.

You're probably going to have some water damage to the cabinets as well, and if they are particleboard, ouch! Not to kick you while you are down, make sure the drywall behind the damaged area is dry. If not, take it out and replace it before you get a mold problem.

I hate to say this, but I would run up the score on the "LG Guy" as much as you can. Water damage can cause many problems down the road, and once you settle, you're done.

I had a similar situation with a shower where the valve was leaking. We have some shitty water here, and the valve krapped out. I ended ripping all down right to the studs and starting fresh. Glad I did, too, as other things needed attention, and the wife got the new bathroom she wanted.

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@Borax Johnson  "we should get a budget"

I hope this is true.   Sadly my experience has been anything but.   Can you wait till the $ are in your hands?

@VWAP's concrete floor idea is the best for certain climates.  Cold in the North though.  Or radiant heat?  No thanks.

If I lived where it was warm, the polished concrete floor in the kitchen looks attractive.

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I have concrete floors on the whole down stairs. Great in the summer to keep things cool. Fucking freezing in the winter and I’m in So Cal. House has no insulation either. Anything heavy you drop on the floors is going to shatter plus chip the surface. They do look great. 

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This is a home owner's insurance claim. They will give me a "budget" on each part. I am just curious on what tha flooring technology is is 2020 vs 1996 when I last did floors. Are the vinyl "wood looking" floors a good thing?

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Like most things, you get what you pay for.  And there are dozens of manufacturers for all types of markets.  Identify a couple of high end condominiums or housing developments locally, find out what they are using, talk to the interior designer and see if they can recommend a product and supplier/installer.  What ever material you chose, don't try to save a few dollars. 

Do you tend to drop things?  Do you track in dirt from the outside?  Some products dent, others have thin wear membranes.  

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We had a flood a few years back and got all new floor coverings from insurance. Vinyl tile for the bathroom, ceramic tile for the kitchen. We had the restoration company scrape off the old asbestos tiles in the kitchen and I did the new tiles myself. Rented a tile saw and kicked it off in a few hours, it's not rocket surgery. We keep a big braided rug on the floor to make it warm and comfy to stand on.

 

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1 hour ago, Borax Johnson said:

 . I am just curious on what tha flooring technology is is 2020 vs 1996 when I last did floors. Are the vinyl "wood looking" floors a good thing?

Go to big box stores and also to flooring/carpeting stores and make a choice. Things have changed only because we were looking in plumbing and gardening while the flooring section was roped off for "update":D

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Future Proof Flooring - get some of that Yellow rubber crap with all the bumps like out front of Home Depot

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22 hours ago, Windward said:

@Borax Johnson  "we should get a budget"

I hope this is true.   Sadly my experience has been anything but.   Can you wait till the $ are in your hands?

@VWAP's concrete floor idea is the best for certain climates.  Cold in the North though.  Or radiant heat?  No thanks.

If I lived where it was warm, the polished concrete floor in the kitchen looks attractive.

With heat in it, it's heaven and almost indestructible.

 

My dream flooring in a kitchen is terrazo.  Heated.

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http://buildnaturally.blogspot.com/2014/01/adobe-floor-basics-how-to-build-dirt.html

 

Adobe Floor Basics - How to build a dirt cheap floor

 

Seems crazy, right?  A dirt floor, of all things!  Well, time for a perception shift...

Adobe floors are lusciously beautiful and quite durable.  And best of all, in most regions they can be made from local clay soil.  (Which makes them dirt cheap...sorry, couldn't resist.)

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On 12/11/2020 at 7:49 PM, Borax Johnson said:

Dishwasher had a leak sinceMay when (apparently) the LG guy didn't get the supply line tight. Drip drip drip for 5 months+.

Getting about 95% of the floor redone - it was all Formica fake wood. I know we will get a budget to match what we had. So, the question is:

Given what we had, what are our potions? I have been told "high end waterproof vinyl wood"(?!?).

What is the 2020 Info for the US - California in particular, because our Governor doesn't need a legislature. Just a pen (no PA jab there, just frustration).

Two more related posts coming soon.....

Absolutely bulletproof for a slab floor, but usually too costly, is terrazzo.  We have that throughout the house and it can take anything.  But it's not all that attractive.  We put CoreTec over it.  It's completely waterproof but if water gets under it, you have to hope it evaporates before mold forms.

In the last house I installed Pergo.  This was the original stuff you glue together.  20 years after installing, it looked almost new and was completely waterproof, but the perimeter has to be sealed or water can get in that way and ruin the floor.

No matter what flooring you install, if it's over a wood substrate, the perimeter must be sealed well enough so water can't get underneath.  Not an easy thing to do.  For a little peace of mind, you could put a drip pan under the DW if you can find a place to drain it off.

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FUCK LG!!!

I had 2 dishwashers fail the same way in 2 different properties about 2 months apart - shit water pump and fucked up the floors. Also had issues with LG washer and dyers...

I run from that brand now...

 

 

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Armstrong solid vinyl (Tiles or sheet). It's damned near bullet proof, and can be quite attractive. I like solid colors, but right now it seems that faux stone, or wood is in.

(Don't get the "peel and stick" stuff. get the tiles or sheet that you have to trowel mastic onto the floor to get it set.)

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On 12/13/2020 at 12:24 PM, DA-WOODY said:

Future Proof Flooring - get some of that Yellow rubber crap with all the bumps like out front of Home Depot

I had that in my front hallway in CT. absolutely bullet proof, and low maintenance, but difficult to keep clean, because of the bumps.

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I'd plan on base cabinets and the sheetrock behind them, subfloor if it isn't concrete slab. I put bamboo down throughout the house aside from the kitchen and bath, floating over that thin foam material they use, but glued together so it's all one piece. If you are anywhere near local, I have about 20 of the strap clamps you need to glue it together. Pain in the knees, but it is dog proof, waterproof, and macaw resistant...Did slate tile in the kitchen, it's kind of soft and uneven, scratches easily, but it's hard to tell.

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My godparents had natural cleft bluestone floors. THICK, like 2" or more. Talk about a beautiful, destruction proof floor..... But you kinda need to put floors like that in when you pour the slab, before framing starts.

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Homeowners insurance is picking up all but the deductible. Base cabinets, cooktop  and counters coming out tomorrow, They were instructed to try and salvage the frames. Dunno if they can.

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25 minutes ago, Borax Johnson said:

Homeowners insurance is picking up all but the deductible. Base cabinets, cooktop  and counters coming out tomorrow, They were instructed to try and salvage the frames. Dunno if they can.

Good luck.  Are the base cabinets sides made of ply or particle board? If particle board they may already have swelled.  Any veneer on that will fail soon.  Finish matching with upper cabinets might be tough either way.

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If you can find some old stock "Congolium" that is the best kitchen flooring ever made.

On 12/16/2020 at 4:44 PM, Borax Johnson said:

Homeowners insurance is picking up all but the deductible. Base cabinets, cooktop  and counters coming out tomorrow, They were instructed to try and salvage the frames. Dunno if they can.

Salvaging the frames will be more work (and $ if it's done properly), than building new, by a lot.

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As all things, "It depends"  - slab? over joists? etc...

My #1 pick for a decent looking no maintenance flooring right now would indeed be what is termed "Luxury Vinyl Plank"  Almost impossible to destroy, impervious to water, looks reasonably decent. Great for kids and pets. Then tile, and/or fake wood tile. (there's some really high-end fake-wood porcelain tile out there right now that's awesome) Indestructible, looks great, costs some $ (+ underlayment prep if you're not on a slab) Then engineered hardwood, then laminate "hardwood" then Real $$$$ Hardwood (which I will never put in a kitchen again...my personal tale of woe was a Kitchen Aid steam oven that popped a leak and destroyed 1200sf of wood.... ). 

I find the vinyl looks as good as the laminate, softer feel underfoot, and you can flood the shit and it's fine. That last feature is a great one. Dog slobber, wet boots, whatever, doesn't care. It's freakin plastic...

Oh, and on the latest part of the thread, you're going to get all new cabinets because the $$$$ for some tradesperson to fix em is going to be way more than just new cabs. 

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