Jump to content

Taylor diesel drip feed yacht heater


Recommended Posts

when I got the boat it came with a Taylor drip feed diesel heater

 

no instructions, so I went on the web and could not find any videos explaining how to light it. There were some terrible vids that featured the heater but no explanation - one had 24,000 views

 

So I made my own

(apologies for the plug on the end)

 

 

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites

Fantastic. I always wondered how those things worked. Really basic tech, no wonder they continue to be popular here. Real heat, dead simple, no attached gizmos to break. 

I couldn't help but think I fire my wood burner the same way. You use 'meth' (what is that?) to preheat not only the firebox but also the flue.

That's the most important part with a wood burner on a boat. A metal chimney in a cold boat isn't going to be drawing. In fact, it's more likely to be the reverse and smoke you out. It needs help:

Before lighting a kindling base in the firebox, I loosely stuff one half paper towel just inside the flue above the firebox. A lighter stick stuffed up there will ignite the paper. You'll hear when the flue reverses and rushes up the stack from the flame.

Then you touch off the kindling which will have a great draft for a minute or two while the stack is hot. 

I like how you show the heat up in the cabin. Heating a cold boat isn't an instant process, especially with a wood burner. But it looks like the Taylor is similar. You start off very close to the fire enjoying the direct radiation. In time, that radiation works a miracle around the cabin and warms all the surfaces. 

Not much difference in the feeding except the timing, I add a chunk of wood about every 10 to 20 minutes. The wood does not lend itself to living aboard in the winter. I'm good with that. :) 

 

The dog that was in the pilot berth in that photo is sleeping right now as I type,  attached to my hip in a big soft chair in our kitchen with a wood pellet stove and a heat pump just behind, keeping us both warm. 

 Fireplace.thumb.jpg.2d6c48a67fbb15e0e6fde45efdaf7c6d.jpg

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TwoLegged said:

No, it's crystal meth.  This is Drug Anarchy

I had no idea for a long while what “metho”, etc was, as I had never read it in context (Dylan’s post makes clear it’s something for pre-heating a stove).

When is a bonnet not a bonnet?  When it’s a hood.  But then, really, that makes no sense either.  Except that they can both be head coverings.  And car parts.  Blighty is that kinda place - it gave us the jabberwock, with its gallumphing and chortle, so we can’t really expect to understand everything that comes out of there :-)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

Sounds like Maine in December to me!

it has been pretty misty moisty thee past few days

we are  due for a couple of niceish days monday and tuesday with interesting light

https://www.windguru.cz/103675

 

 

the boat is now ready for some cold overnights

 

I am planning to head around the eastern rivers this winter. The problem is the long nights - with the cabin heater and a full moon I am planning to fill my evenings with some night sailing along the  estuaries.

 

The night time acoustic from the birds is marvelous

D

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

I had no idea for a long while what “metho”, etc was, as I had never read it in context (Dylan’s post makes clear it’s something for pre-heating a stove).

When is a bonnet not a bonnet?  When it’s a hood.  But then, really, that makes no sense either.  Except that they can both be head coverings.  And car parts.  Blighty is that kinda place - it gave us the jabberwock, with its gallumphing and chortle, so we can’t really expect to understand everything that comes out of there :-)

For 10 years, a Welshman and his wife moved into our tiny neighborhood, for 9 months out of every year. Aled was here to teach a master class in furniture building and design at the local School of Furniture Craftsmanship in Rockport.  We four became close friends early on and spent much lovely time together. Sadly they have moved back to Wales full time.

Wonderful people what I miss the most is hearing their voices. He is a master! For fun he decided to build a banjo, and then learn to play it. But, don't we all do that? 

Just listen to Aled talk: 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

I had no idea for a long while what “metho”, etc was, as I had never read it in context (Dylan’s post makes clear it’s something for pre-heating a stove).

When is a bonnet not a bonnet?  When it’s a hood.  But then, really, that makes no sense either.  Except that they can both be head coverings.  And car parts.  Blighty is that kinda place - it gave us the jabberwock, with its gallumphing and chortle, so we can’t really expect to understand everything that comes out of there :-)

this is dangerous stuff

 

one time I was driving a pick up at about 60 miles an hour

 

I was 19 years old, my first ranch job, my first pick up...v6 chevy

 

my boss was sitting beside me

he was a quietly spoken man in a cowboy hat

 

he said

 

^you are about to run out of pavement"

I thought it an interesting, albeit irrelevant observation

then I ran out of pavement

new steering bar and one rear shock needed replacing

bumma

D

 

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Just flew from Tasmania to Seattle to pick up a new (to us) boat, rang the boatyard to take it out of the water.

Me: “I would like to slip the boat and antifoul it”

Her “Excuse me, could you repeat that please?”

After some discussion, we agreed I wanted to haul the boat and paint it....

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Fantastic. I always wondered how those things worked. Really basic tech, no wonder they continue to be popular here. Real heat, dead simple, no attached gizmos to break. 

I couldn't help but think I fire my wood burner the same way. You use 'meth' (what is that?) to preheat not only the firebox but also the flue.

That's the most important part with a wood burner on a boat. A metal chimney in a cold boat isn't going to be drawing. In fact, it's more likely to be the reverse and smoke you out. It needs help:

Before lighting a kindling base in the firebox, I loosely stuff one half paper towel just inside the flue above the firebox. A lighter stick stuffed up there will ignite the paper. You'll hear when the flue reverses and rushes up the stack from the flame.

Then you touch off the kindling which will have a great draft for a minute or two while the stack is hot. 

I like how you show the heat up in the cabin. Heating a cold boat isn't an instant process, especially with a wood burner. But it looks like the Taylor is similar. You start off very close to the fire enjoying the direct radiation. In time, that radiation works a miracle around the cabin and warms all the surfaces. 

Not much difference in the feeding except the timing, I add a chunk of wood about every 10 to 20 minutes. The wood does not lend itself to living aboard in the winter. I'm good with that. :) 

 

The dog that was in the pilot berth in that photo is sleeping right now as I type,  attached to my hip in a big soft chair in our kitchen with a wood pellet stove and a heat pump just behind, keeping us both warm. 

 Fireplace.thumb.jpg.2d6c48a67fbb15e0e6fde45efdaf7c6d.jpg

 

Is that an open fireplace on your boat?

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, billr said:

Is that an open fireplace on your boat?

Yes it is. Pretty common on 60's boats. Simpson Lawrence built cast the fireboxes in Scotland and builders fitted them into many boats. There is a plate that covers most of the firebox that is in place most of the time. Still, there's been more than one spark that bounced around the sole over the years. Just like a fireplace at home, stay away from softwoods that are full of sap. 

195306296_Fireplaceclosed.thumb.jpg.3f7e05ffc70bf582c5cc43c5a2252f96.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, I'm late to this thread.

Dylan, that stove is brilliant! Gravity fed, nothing to break and it seems to get HOT. Imagine if you put a little battery powered fan to blow across it for a little while to circulate the hot air?

My buddy has finally fired off his Wallas diesel stove/cabin heater. He says it's quite nice but does not have the "oomph" necessary for living aboard in zero or below. He says it's mainly great for fall cruising. The Wallas is far more complex. The fuel metering is extremely precise and driven by an electric pump. Supposedly they are extremely reliable but don't *ever* tamper with the fuel delivery system or attempt to adjust it. It is not DIY friendly at all.

I am contemplating some sort of permanently installed heat but I don't think I'm ready to take that plunge yet. I don't think I do enough real cold weather sailing to force myself in that direction so it's propane for me. If my sailing habits or location change, then I will definitely install something.

I love Kris' fireplace but having to stoke it every 20 minutes seems a bit of work. Tom Cunliffe demonstrated a solid fuel stove that burns coal:

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't know what camera you are using, but if a regular DSLR you might want to invest in a wide angle zoom lens. Something like the Tokina 11-20 f2.8. (about 300 GBP) for a crop system, for example. It can be hard to tell what's going on with the narrow field of view and the camera waving about all over the place.

There are also clip on ultra wide lenses for phones, haven't used myself though. 

Other than that, interesting. Refleks in Denmark make similar heaters.

Of course one can't beat the warmth of a cast iron solid fuel stove in an old wooden workboat, though dragging the peat briquettes on board every day in the winter gets old fast.. Good way to dispose of non-plastic boat rubbish too. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Ajax said:

Ok, I'm late to this thread.

Dylan, that stove is brilliant! Gravity fed, nothing to break and it seems to get HOT. Imagine if you put a little battery powered fan to blow across it for a little while to circulate the hot air?

My buddy has finally fired off his Wallas diesel stove/cabin heater. He says it's quite nice but does not have the "oomph" necessary for living aboard in zero or below. He says it's mainly great for fall cruising. The Wallas is far more complex. The fuel metering is extremely precise and driven by an electric pump. Supposedly they are extremely reliable but don't *ever* tamper with the fuel delivery system or attempt to adjust it. It is not DIY friendly at all.

I am contemplating some sort of permanently installed heat but I don't think I'm ready to take that plunge yet. I don't think I do enough real cold weather sailing to force myself in that direction so it's propane for me. If my sailing habits or location change, then I will definitely install something.

For future reference, I had a Dickinson propane fireplace on my first boat and it was great. Very efficient and they somehow designed the only propane appliance I've ever seen with some charm. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, IStream said:

For future reference, I had a Dickinson propane fireplace on my first boat and it was great. Very efficient and they somehow designed the only propane appliance I've ever seen with some charm. 

my daughter put one in her tiny house and it does work great and look very nice.  My only problem with the Dickinson Newport was the requirement of a 3 inch hole for the flue/intake.  Dickinson seem to have taken over the Sig Marine Cozy Cabin propane heater which draws combustion from the interior and therefore only requires a 1 inch flue...only 5000 btu output, though.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, chester said:

my daughter put one in her tiny house and it does work great and look very nice.  My only problem with the Dickinson Newport was the requirement of a 3 inch hole for the flue/intake.  Dickinson seem to have taken over the Sig Marine Cozy Cabin propane heater which draws combustion from the interior and therefore only requires a 1 inch flue...only 5000 btu output, though.

I would've loved that little heater on the boat yesterday...

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Ajax said:

Ok, I'm late to this thread.

Dylan, that stove is brilliant! Gravity fed, nothing to break and it seems to get HOT. Imagine if you put a little battery powered fan to blow across it for a little while to circulate the hot air?

My buddy has finally fired off his Wallas diesel stove/cabin heater. He says it's quite nice but does not have the "oomph" necessary for living aboard in zero or below. He says it's mainly great for fall cruising. The Wallas is far more complex. The fuel metering is extremely precise and driven by an electric pump. Supposedly they are extremely reliable but don't *ever* tamper with the fuel delivery system or attempt to adjust it. It is not DIY friendly at all.

I am contemplating some sort of permanently installed heat but I don't think I'm ready to take that plunge yet. I don't think I do enough real cold weather sailing to force myself in that direction so it's propane for me. If my sailing habits or location change, then I will definitely install something.

I love Kris' fireplace but having to stoke it every 20 minutes seems a bit of work. Tom Cunliffe demonstrated a solid fuel stove that burns coal:

 

A relative's Alden came with only an 18 gallon diesel tank but a coal scuttle with deckplate to feed the stove.  Getting rid of the ash and clinkers can't be fun. One badly timed puff....

Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, chester said:

my daughter put one in her tiny house and it does work great and look very nice.  My only problem with the Dickinson Newport was the requirement of a 3 inch hole for the flue/intake.  Dickinson seem to have taken over the Sig Marine Cozy Cabin propane heater which draws combustion from the interior and therefore only requires a 1 inch flue...only 5000 btu output, though.

Yeah, I sat poised over my cabintop with a 3" hole saw for some minutes before I screwed up the courage to (literally) take the plunge. However, it was well worth it. The coax chimney not only uses outside combustion air, they set it up so the intake air surrounds the exhaust line to both keep the pipe cool to the touch and to recover a lot of waste heat by pre-heating the incoming air, which also makes the combustion more complete. 

At one point I needed to replace an EOL propane tank and figured I'd burn off the remaining propane using the heater before venting the tank. The tank felt completely empty so I figured it'd be a quick task. It took 8 hours.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ha, I had the opposite problem-

This summer I had an old propane tank that I hoped would get me through a weekend of camping. Whatever the hell was in it, wouldn't burn. The galley quit burning and the pilot light for the water heater wouldn't stay lit but when I removed the tank it didn't feel empty and something was sloshing inside it. I switched tanks, using the same regulator and everything worked beautifully.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe a faulty OPD or something. Nothing worse than an unreliable tank. Back when they were ticking timebombs, there wasn't much to go wrong. Now they've got "stuff" inside of them to make them safer, sometimes to a fault.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, ok. The tank was very old and I think it was past its hydro date so I just exchanged it at one of those automatic kiosks. I was curious if the LPG itself had turned sour somehow and just wouldn't burn or perhaps I got a load of the oils that don't burn well.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, chester said:

my daughter put one in her tiny house and it does work great and look very nice.  My only problem with the Dickinson Newport was the requirement of a 3 inch hole for the flue/intake.  Dickinson seem to have taken over the Sig Marine Cozy Cabin propane heater which draws combustion from the interior and therefore only requires a 1 inch flue...only 5000 btu output, though.

Interesting - I have a Dickinson Alaska diesel heater and it has a 3" flue but this is strictly for the exhaust gases, I assumed. I got the heater new old stock here in Australia but without the flue kit, deck penetration bit etc etc. The price from Dickinson was OK but the freight cost was so horrific that I passed and decided to make all the bits myself.

It's not really that cold here and I've a heavily insulated boat so the installation has been long drawn out and desultory WRT progress. Maybe before next winter kicks in.

Friends had a wood heater from some Nova Scotia foundry. Cute little thing, gave out lots of heat but small wood sizes. They used to collect bags of old dry pine cones from my place to burn in it. A lot more bulk than a couple 20 litre cans of fuel.

FKT

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Interesting - I have a Dickinson Alaska diesel heater and it has a 3" flue but this is strictly for the exhaust gases, I assumed. I got the heater new old stock here in Australia but without the flue kit, deck penetration bit etc etc. The price from Dickinson was OK but the freight cost was so horrific that I passed and decided to make all the bits myself.

The propane heaters get the double wall chimney. Diesel onea use combustion air from the cabin with a basic exhaust-only chimney.

 

Just to confuse things, they make a Newport propane heater and a Newport diesel heater, which are totally different. Oh, and a Newport solid fuel heater, which is yet again totally different from the first two.

Link to post
Share on other sites

A bag of charcoal and a small stove really does make it more civilized. Your condensed breath doesn’t drip off the overhead and onto your forehead for one thing.

Unfortunately, Red Herring’s saloon is too small.

SHC

Link to post
Share on other sites

My friend with the Wallas estimates that his fuel consumption is 1 gallon/30 hours if the thing is running at full blat. Of course there is a tiny amount of battery consumption involved as well because there is a small blower.

I imagine Dylan's drip diesel heater is just as thrifty if not more.

My Mr. Heater "Big Buddy" is a hog. The documentation says that a 1lb. bottle should last 5.5 hours on the LOW setting (4,000 BTU). I don't think I've ever stretched a 1lb. bottle for 5.5 hours. It's more like 3 hours. The documentation says that a 20lb bottle will last 108 hours. I rather doubt it.  I don't see why a Taylor/Newport would be much more efficient than any other propane heater but I suppose it's possible.

I think a diesel heater is the "winner" because they are the most thrifty and they reduce the number of fuels a boat must carry.  Propane is bulky to carry and less efficient. Solid fuel is great but again, you have to make room to carry an fuel and then deal with the cleanup.

The downside with my buddy's Wallas is that the stove is in the aft end of the cabin because it's part of the galley. The heat will never make it to the v-berth/head area but having the heater integrated with the stove and the stove running on the same fuel as the auxiliary is a wonderful consolidation of space and fuels.

Ah compromises,  compromises.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/14/2020 at 2:59 PM, Ajax said:

Ok, I'm late to this thread.

Dylan, that stove is brilliant! Gravity fed, nothing to break and it seems to get HOT. Imagine if you put a little battery powered fan to blow across it for a little while to circulate the hot air?

I would opt to one without battery: https://www.amazon.com/s?k=stove+fan&ref=nb_sb_noss_2

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Upp3 said:

I would opt to one without battery: https://www.amazon.com/s?k=stove+fan&ref=nb_sb_noss_2

Dude, that is brilliant!  I use a pellet stove in my home. I'm going to investigate this for the house as well. I guess Dylan would attach it to the side of his diesel heater somehow?

Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Dude, that is brilliant!  I use a pellet stove in my home. I'm going to investigate this for the house as well. I guess Dylan would attach it to the side of his diesel heater somehow?

the original https://ecofan.caframobrands.ca/  more expensive.  and at least ecofan makes a distinction between the type of stove:  gas and pellet stoves have less surface heat that wood burners and they have a fan for both.  Just consider this when selecting.  

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...