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2 hours ago, guerdon said:

I love these. shapely beauties.  The keg hung rudders were structural.  At the time the bearings were not strong enough and carbon tubes were unavailable.

:lol:

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It was an odd time the late IOR period. Fantastic fleets, great racing and many beautiful looking boats that were absolute cunts of things to sail. Back them most  owners actually knew how to sail and

Having renovated an IOR 1-tonner, I feel obliged to point out that there are way cheaper ways to get a tidy boat on to a start line

My old Two Tonner HEATHER designed for and built by John Buchan. HEATHER is now a live aboard cruising boat in south Puget Sound.

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2 hours ago, guerdon said:

I love these. shapely beauties.  The keg hung rudders were structural.  At the time the bearings were not strong enough and carbon tubes were unavailable.

Honestly, I think half the time, the skeg was supported by the rudder, not the other way around :huh:

To get a skeg that skinny to provide any real support would be A: Heavy, and B: Really hard to build/mold...

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5 hours ago, guerdon said:

I love these. shapely beauties.  The keg hung rudders were structural.  At the time the bearings were not strong enough and carbon tubes were unavailable.

My guess is the skegs were due to the largish bustles that were thought to be favourable under the RORC rule (RORC hull measurements and length calcs were a precursor to IOR) which carried on into the early days of IOR.

It wasn't until guys like Bruce Kirby and Doug Peterson started integrating a spade rudder with a smaller skeg and Ron Holland started putting a spade rudder under the bustle that the skegs started disappearing from IOR boats.  Before that, even Carter's designs like Ydra had skegs.

Bu if you look at the launch photo of the C&C Red Jacket below which predates all of the above you will see no hint of a bustle and a quite spindly scimitar rudder and stock.  Or even look at a Cal 40.

In simplest terms: generally speaking, no bustle - no skeg.

rj-l-006.jpg

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10 hours ago, 12 metre said:

My guess is the skegs were due to the largish bustles that were thought to be favourable under the RORC rule (RORC hull measurements and length calcs were a precursor to IOR) which carried on into the early days of IOR.

It wasn't until guys like Bruce Kirby and Doug Peterson started integrating a spade rudder with a smaller skeg and Ron Holland started putting a spade rudder under the bustle that the skegs started disappearing from IOR boats.  Before that, even Carter's designs like Ydra had skegs.

Bu if you look at the launch photo of the C&C Red Jacket below which predates all of the above you will see no hint of a bustle and a quite spindly scimitar rudder and stock.  Or even look at a Cal 40.

In simplest terms: generally speaking, no bustle - no skeg.

rj-l-006.jpg

rj-l-006.jpg

“Red Jacket (1964)[edit]

Canadian yachtsman Perry Connolly asked George Cuthbertson of Cuthbertson & Cassian to design a custom 40 ft (12 m) racing sloop for him. The design directive called for flat-out speed. Connolly said he wanted "the meanest, hungriest 40-footer afloat".[8][10][11]

As a result of a connection through his earlier relationship with Metro Marine, Bruckmann was asked to build this new boat, named  Red Jacket, from the design by Cuthbertson.[6] Starting in 1963 and through 1964 Red Jacket, was built by Erich Bruckmann at Bruckmann Manufacturing in fiberglass with a balsa core, the resulting structure was strong, stiff and significantly lighter than the wood or solid fiberglass yachts then sailing. Red Jacket is considered to be the first sailboat engineered with a cored hull (other earlier boats had balsa-cored decks and powerboat builders were then using it in transoms and superstructures).[8] No doubt the weight savings and panel stiffness of her cored hull contributed significantly to her racing success. She was launched in May 1966 and took 11 of 13 starts that summer. That winter, Red Jacket headed south and won the famed SORC (Southern Ocean Racing Conference), also called "the circuit," which was a series of six races with the major two being from St. Petersburg to Fort Lauderdale and from Miami to Nassau, competing against over 85 of the best racers of the day. Red Jacket was the first Canadian boat to win the SORC. She is still actively raced by her owners, members the Royal Canadian Yacht Club.[10]

 

Where did that photo come from? In the early 70s sailed with Steve one of the crew in suits on Red Jacket above, it’s Canada, Ah. To design the deck they the crew spent the winter on a tilted deck mock-up sheeting and manovering in a heated shed to get the layout optimized…

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Fingal RORC half-tonner, designed by Knud H Reimers. Prototype Fin Gal was 13:th at HTC -68 (28 yachts). This design inspired Peter Norlin to create Scampi

Kan vara en bild av jordens vatten

https://www.blocket.se/annons/halland/fingal_segelbat/96735903?fbclid=IwAR0VezxqOyjSnp77pLUE_tsMA5MvX5JWx2gz7H3u5w7xuyVm4uMQavIrBCU

https://www.sailguide.com/batfakta/fingal?fbclid=IwAR0e6fiDgCxbnpd01ZL5JA1gtm9ShpHL15PAx829PUIy0NwCWQQXT4bvbMM

Yes, this is a RORC half-tonner and this is the yacht that inspired Peter Norlin to create Scampi: "To market the boat, Reimers hired some young talented racers, including Peter Norlin, and let them sail the boat in Gotland Runt. The boat won RORC class IV in 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968 and 1969. Wins six years in a row, no other boat has managed such a suite and Knud Reimers Fingal thus became historic.
Fingal's suite was first broken when former crew Peter Norlin designed and built his own boat, Scampi, and with it won both Gotland Runt and the WC for half a tonne.", see: http://bangefamily.name/?fbclid=IwAR1ipud_Q5psS_GvQs0WMNdr1rvfnMlhpnN-elmoVbOcs52kyjUkBzrI3n8
 
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On 7/28/2021 at 12:43 PM, 12 metre said:

In simplest terms: generally speaking, no bustle - no skeg.

rj-l-006.jpg

Interesting. 
The background has a ReservoirDogs vibe.

Style and class

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Gorgeous boat. Some of those construction pics indicate there must have been a brutal amount of fairing to get that perfect finish.

I can't believe anyone ever thought that rudder shape was right.

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Albin Accent 26 1/4-tonner designed by Peter Norlin

Kan vara en bild av jordens vatten

https://www.blocket.se/annons/stockholm/albin_accent_26_fot/96761415?fbclid=IwAR2uwFcUyn4Eao52IHBR93lPFGSwKxlmJbkkheCBPE_LYEQK6pQKeWfvCFs

Google translate of link above "Hi!
sailboat Albin accent 26 feet. Available in Åkersberga [Sweden]. Not top condition.
Call when the email is borrowed.
Björn 070 729 30 61"
 
 
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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

I can't believe anyone ever thought that rudder shape was right.

I actually asked @Bob Perryabout that rudder configuration last week.  The theory was that it would reduce turbulence at the interface between the rudder and the hull.  It probably did.  But also at the cost of eliminating what could have been the benefit of the end-plate effect.

^^^all of that assumes I actually understood what I heard.  

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34 minutes ago, sledracr said:

I actually asked @Bob Perryabout that rudder configuration last week.  The theory was that it would reduce turbulence at the interface between the rudder and the hull.  It probably did.  But also at the cost of eliminating what could have been the benefit of the end-plate effect.

^^^all of that assumes I actually understood what I heard.  

Pretty much what you said.

Although more correct to say reduces interference drag. 

Lots of designer use the same principal today - reducing foil chord and thickness at the root.  Just executed differently. 

Basically you want to minimize the foil sectional area where it meets the hull.  The C&C scimitar rudder kind of takes that to the extreme with the only area being the rudder stock itself.

Of course a round  stock section in itself has a lot of form drag - and like you mention eliminates any end-plate effect.

One of those things which theoretically created an advantage which was offset by the disadvantages conferred by such a design.

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Yeah, but...

There were aeronautics somewhere in C&C's background and that field is where the term"If it looks right it is right" came from.

That scimitar rudder jes' don't look right.

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Yeah, but...

There were aeronautics somewhere in C&C's background and that field is where the term"If it looks right it is right" came from.

That scimitar rudder jes' don't look right.

Ironically, it was the aeronautics field where the Area Rule came about resulting in the wasp waisting of supersonic jet aircraft - which also doesn't really look right.

A similar concept trickled down to yacht design and interference drag.  It's all about flattening and smoothing out the area curve.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZWBVgL8I54

https://www.boldmethod.com/learn-to-fly/aerodynamics/area-rule/

 

 

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53 minutes ago, LordBooster said:

Cursor 38' from -84 designed by Tom Wylie

Was a very good boat in Southern California back in the day.  As was near-sister Marishanna...

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29 minutes ago, sledracr said:

Was a very good boat in Southern California back in the day.  As was near-sister Marishanna...

Kind of reminiscent of the Schumacher Wall Street Duck - looking very sad in the photo below.  I  think Bob Perry stumbled across her in a yard a few years ago and provided the photo.

Don't know if WSD has sold, or someone revived her - or if she is truly landfill now.

Anyone aware of her current status?

035_zps2zp2znmp (1).jpg

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15 minutes ago, 12 metre said:

Anyone aware of her current status?

Last I heard, still rotting away at Betts.

From January (in this same thread): "WSD is rotting away in Anacortes, WA, an old friend and former North Sails guy who is now into Alfa Romeos owns her, asked me if I want to be a partner and I ran away as fast as my old limbs would allow me. I walked up a ladder and walked on the deck, was careful not to fall through.   Very sad ending to a great Schumacher boat. " 

@Somebody Else might know something more recent?

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9 minutes ago, sledracr said:

Last I heard, still rotting away at Betts.

@Somebody Else might know?

Only interested in her status for nostalgia purposes.  No interest in acquiring her.

Speaking of IOR landfills - we have had the old Foxhound (ex-Silver Shadow III) sitting in our yard in much worse condition than WSD for at least 7 years now - paying close to $8k/yr in storage fees with absolutely no work done on her.

I mean who throws away $60k for nothing?  Mind you, I think the current owners are a few months in arrears and we may be close to seizing her.  Although I doubt we would get much or anything for her - but there are always the dreamers.

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5 hours ago, sledracr said:

Was a very good boat in Southern California back in the day.  As was near-sister Marishanna...

did dave dwoskin own marishanna?

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3 hours ago, bigrpowr said:

did dave dwoskin own marishanna?

Could be, it was a long time ago.  IIRC, "Marishanna" was named for his daughter.

At the time, Ron Baerwitz (sp?) was running the program, and Dee Smith was doing tactics, which was... interesting.

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8 hours ago, 12 metre said:

Kind of reminiscent of the Schumacher Wall Street Duck - looking very sad in the photo below.  I  think Bob Perry stumbled across her in a yard a few years ago and provided the photo.

Don't know if WSD has sold, or someone revived her - or if she is truly landfill now.

Anyone aware of her current status?

035_zps2zp2znmp (1).jpg

Looks exactly the same if not worse.

Just sitting there getting rained on, snowed on, sun-beat on...

 

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She was not quick (to rating). Only really raced for a very short time. Dupont (?maker of kev cloth) sponsored the build.  Sat for quite a while out of the water. Last I heard sold off to a dreamer & now living in Keehi Lagoon. Possibly a houseboat.

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I left the islands about when this boat was first sold off by the Lims. Great Red Shark who posts here occasionally would know much more, he sails/races in Keehi Lagoon. Or any  of the handfull of Oahu based Anarchists.

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4 hours ago, LordBooster said:

25’ Farr designed, KEVFLYER, built in Honolulu by Foo Lim & Sons Yal & Kui, about 1980. Anyone having info about her? Kan vara en bild av båtracing och hav

https://www.facebook.com/groups/203537404677541/posts/351054696592477

 

25'? Those must be little people sailing it.

Looks more like it would rate 25'

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29 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

25'? Those must be little people sailing it.

Looks more like it would rate 25'

The cold molded boat in the background is surely not 25'  Looks almost like a 1 tonner...

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The Facebook link claims the woody in the background is Ruffian a 36 footer owned by Russell Johnson if that helps.  I Know nothing about her other than what Facebook says.

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21 minutes ago, 12 metre said:

 Ruffian a 36 footer 

There was a Ruffian in the '82 Clipper Cup, local (Hawaii) boat, listed as a 36-footer designed by Wilson (?)

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I just watched a start of the Quarter Tonners at Cowes race week.

Can someone please explain to me why almost every single one of them had sails worth substantially more than their boats? $5000 leadmines with $20k suites of string sails JFC.

Even the Div 1 Performance Keelboats worth $500k only had $20k suites of sails!

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18 minutes ago, darth reapius said:

I just watched a start of the Quarter Tonners at Cowes race week.

Can someone please explain to me why almost every single one of them had sails worth substantially more than their boats? $5000 leadmines with $20k suites of string sails JFC.

Even the Div 1 Performance Keelboats worth $500k only had $20k suites of sails!

You'll find out that these boats have been reshuffled (rig & keel) and rebuilt for more than $50k.

Question then is why people regroup in a such a dry-sailed class, must be some reason ..... and lack of something in the current offerings.

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Regarding quarter-tonners: Renovation of Mootley 26' Quarter-tonner, designed by Maurillo Vinhas de Queiroz, built 1982 by Fibramar shipyard 225367247_10223344084102655_4887617607455103812_n.jpg?_nc_cat=103&ccb=1-3&_nc_sid=b9115d&_nc_ohc=-PxubzM_980AX-9v3OO&_nc_ht=scontent-cph2-1.xx&oh=6c2656702cfa616a827b1115708045b9&oe=610F127B

228221238_10223344083942651_5450923001023761336_n.jpg?_nc_cat=100&ccb=1-3&_nc_sid=b9115d&_nc_ohc=5MNrcbSTw9QAX_jAoQc&_nc_ht=scontent-cph2-1.xx&oh=f86ea53e14333818c564acb79876628c&oe=610EF344

https://veleiromootley.blogspot.com/?fbclid=IwAR0qy0Kj9r1qIAE9RPvgZmj1179NcW4EkxyH-QKuoArc7Lrdrwr0-NDfP9c

"The quarter ton ranges from 24 - 26 feet according to the designer's interpretation of the IOR rules. In the case of Mootley, the designer was Maurillo Vinhas de Queiroz, who sought to optimize the performance of the sailboat Zim, a medal-winner in the early 1980s. Later, the Mootley family project served as the basis for Sirius 27 , a more cruise-oriented boat produced by the Golden Nautica shipyard.
The Maurillo project gave rise to three boats: the Longueiul (which was used by Lars Grael) currently Ichtus - Santos SP, the Zim II (currently Pianinha, ex Taxi Driver) in Brasilia - DF, and the Mootley. The Mootley was the last to be built and was ordered with a solid fiberglass hull without the use of klegecell. The boat was built under the fast cruising philosophy, combining an interior with cruising amenities with a regatta rig.", https://veleiromootley.blogspot.com/search?updated-max=2010-10-17T22%3A47%3A00-02%3A00&max-results=7&fbclid=IwAR285odDxS6OnWB3XB9JH0JsVJkziZCi66-DDNP8WVo0LNaJco5oqJSmJ7Y
 
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5 hours ago, moody frog said:

Question then is why people regroup in a such a dry-sailed class, must be some reason ..... and lack of something in the current offerings.

Yea, easier to recruit a crew for "such a dry-sailed class". The Nintendo generation. But most important fun sailing and perhaps individuality instead of one-design.

 

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Mescanno from -88 cruising-regatta, Rating IOR 23, designed by Federico Alberigi, renovation project Kan vara en bild av utomhus

https://www.likesx.com/barca-a-vela-10-m-da-restaurare/

"Federico Alberigi was born in Rome in 1939 where he attended the art school and the faculty of architecture; in 1963 he became a lecturer in technical design, until 1986. Since 2003 he has been conducting the Masters for wind mechanical engineers sent by the Milan Polytechnic and internships in yacht designer for architects from the La Sapienza University of Rome.
In the 1960s he attended, first as a student and then as an instructor, the best European sailing schools.
In the 1970s he specialized in shipbuilding and design.
In 1978 he founded, in Fiumicino, the Mescal Nautica of which he is still the designer, the technical director and the sole owner.", see: http://www.mescalnautica.com/oldsite/presentazione.html
 
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8 hours ago, LordBooster said:

Those are handsome boats.

Webb Chiles took one eastabout to NZ so the basic quality must be there.

 

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8 hours ago, moody frog said:

You'll find out that these boats have been reshuffled (rig & keel) and rebuilt for more than $50k.

Question then is why people regroup in a such a dry-sailed class, must be some reason ..... and lack of something in the current offerings.

Pretty simple - IOR boats are fun and active - it's like driving an early 911 or Shelby Mustang - not nearly as good as new stuff but it has a charm and a soul the new stuff just ain't got.

Those heavily modded top level QT's are like a restomod muscle car.

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4 hours ago, leuk said:

 

contessa-yachts-43-huge-314442656495708c.thumb.jpg.4de9a11a94d14694e580b00877388037.jpg

https://www.facebook.com/groups/203537404677541/permalink/352282266469720/

 

On IOR landfills FB page. This is an absolute beauty. I love Contessa designs.

It's for sale, so here's the page and more pics :

Contessa Yachts 43 in vendita - barca a vela / yacht a vela usate/i (yachtall.com)

 

 

This is the racing version. I think only 2 were built. Moonshine and La Pantera, both in 1977 for the Admirals Cup.

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On 7/31/2021 at 8:26 PM, sledracr said:

Could be, it was a long time ago.  IIRC, "Marishanna" was named for his daughter.

At the time, Ron Baerwitz (sp?) was running the program, and Dee Smith was doing tactics, which was... interesting.

yep, good ole ronnie, the flying dutchman sailor. was on our boat a lot.

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My fascination  with the early IOR mini and 1/4 ton boats deals comes from their individuality.  Each one seems to strive to solve the slow boat/ fast with a cabin design brief.  They are curvy and pointy.  That era gave us a playful parade that just developed a fun positive attitude.  The problem with "modern" designs is that they are cold.  Warm curves or cold performance, for me it was never a choice.  It's a big ocean we might as well caress it.

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5 minutes ago, guerdon said:

My fascination  with the early IOR mini and 1/4 ton boats deals comes from their individuality.  Each one seems to strive to solve the slow boat/ fast with a cabin design brief.  They are curvy and pointy.  That era gave us a playful parade that just developed a fun positive attitude.  The problem with "modern" designs is that they are cold.  Warm curves or cold performance, for me it was never a choice.  It's a big ocean we might as well caress it.

Agree on the caress thing, but so many IOR boats just try to shove big piles of it out of the way.

FB- Doug

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17 hours ago, LordBooster said:

Yea, easier to recruit a crew for "such a dry-sailed class". The Nintendo generation. But most important fun sailing and perhaps individuality instead of one-design.

 

Yep !

I guess they looked for a class which would fit with their life rythm and provide fun when they were free to sail. QTs then somehow crossed the most boxes when duly -and intelligently- modified , by the class.

(Going backwards in their lives was probably nice too)

That behind the class was a hard pushing individual certainly helped.

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The curvy pointy ended little IOR ones do fine if you stay off the ends and respect "hull speed".  The newer boats use bowsprits and everyone clings to the sides and the stern to overcome fast boat/slow.  It just is a matter how you define fun.  Like old cars require certain handling techniques, new cars need new tires all the time to stay sticky, old cars just slide around on narrow wheels with smiling drivers.

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On 8/3/2021 at 1:26 AM, LordBooster said:

Ashore a Swan 651 fell onto the half-tonner Local Hero 2 designed by Philippe Briand, pic from March 2020. Anyone having any news about her? Kan vara en bild av utomhus

http://www.histoiredeshalfs.com/BR5.htm?fbclid=IwAR0qGnpcXDm0z27KNgHT2KAXeUkJPGMCHqmgDvawE-IopyjdjrBZfydeZVE

 

Apparently Local Hero 2 was crushed by the big Swan back in 1997 so almost 25 years ago.

Photo below is shortly after the incident I presume. She is the red (maroon?) hull and you can see a part of her name near the bow.

Her topside got can opened pretty good and keel root was bent.   Looks like someone has kinda sorta patched the deck a bit.

But if that is the result of 25 years of work, then there isn't much hope for her IMO. Can't imagine what she must be like below being exposed to the elements like that.

1997 04 YW Half.jpg

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1 hour ago, 12 metre said:

But if that is the result of 25 years of work, then there isn't much hope for her IMO. Can't imagine what she must be like below being exposed to the elements like that.

Yea, exposed to the elements...

 

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21 hours ago, guerdon said:

My fascination  with the early IOR mini and 1/4 ton boats deals comes from their individuality.  Each one seems to strive to solve the slow boat/ fast with a cabin design brief.  They are curvy and pointy.  That era gave us a playful parade that just developed a fun positive attitude.  The problem with "modern" designs is that they are cold.  Warm curves or cold performance, for me it was never a choice.  It's a big ocean we might as well caress it.

Early IOR boats actually had pretty hulls. Too bad their rigs were those horrible monster-masthead types with tiny maisails that resembled an 80's necktie, and enormous genoas Christo may have used to wrap a fucking island! Later IOR boats had proper rigs - bigger mainsails, 105% jibs, bendy mast 7/8 with running backstays... but now the hulls were awful! If I could find an IOR boat with an "early" hull and a "late" rig, I would take it.

(Well, actualy I wouldn't because I am pretty satisfied with my slim Dane. The Scandinavians were doing their own thing troughout the whole IOR and IMS era, and looking back from today's perspective they had been right all the time.) 

 

 

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My Ranger22, has a beautiful bendy 7/8 rig with vortex generating ribs[Ala Lindholm] located in just the right places.  The mainsail is not a ribbon, but it is high aspect and twists off to unload like a windsurfer.  She has several jibs which is part of the fun of these classics.  Many of the new boats don't feel like miniature ocean races for a couple,  They are great, but somehow, lack the energy of the oldies.  Much like a hot rod with climate control and a big stereo.  My SAAB 93f was weird, loud and simple like these Gems.

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7 hours ago, guerdon said:

My SAAB 93f was weird, loud and simple like these Gems.

And vortex generating ribs, didn't they test something like that in the America's Cup. Or was it saw-blade kind of teeth? Yea, the old SAABs had very good space in the engine compartment. Place for both sail- and golf bag. Nowadays the engine compartment of the cars totally crowded with electronics and stuff. No room for a hand, cannot even change a bulb...

 

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Abelone half-tonner from -79 designed by Birger Braadland, being prepared for the HTC reunion 2023 in Norway. For sale 10:th of July 2021 "søker rette eier", according to Martin Kamperhaug. Perhaps some Whiting inspiration in the bow sections?

Kan vara en bild av jordens vatten och text där det står ”ABELONE”

Martin Kamperhaug: https://www.facebook.com/photo?fbid=4417214458303102&set=gm.506985563750883

http://www.histoiredeshalfs.com/E238.htm

 

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On 8/3/2021 at 6:42 PM, guerdon said:

My fascination  with the early IOR mini and 1/4 ton boats deals comes from their individuality.  Each one seems to strive to solve the slow boat/ fast with a cabin design brief.  They are curvy and pointy.  That era gave us a playful parade that just developed a fun positive attitude.  The problem with "modern" designs is that they are cold.  Warm curves or cold performance, for me it was never a choice.  It's a big ocean we might as well caress it.

yes they had a certain beauty of a gone now era.  I wonder if their hull shapes can be preserved digitally?

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41 minutes ago, LordBooster said:

Abelone half-tonner from -79 designed by Birger Braadland, being prepared for the HTC reunion 2023 in Norway. For sale 10:th of July 2021 "søker rette eier", according to Martin Kamperhaug. Perhaps some Whiting inspiration in the bow sections?

Kan vara en bild av jordens vatten och text där det står ”ABELONE”

Martin Kamperhaug: https://www.facebook.com/photo?fbid=4417214458303102&set=gm.506985563750883

http://www.histoiredeshalfs.com/E238.htm

 

I think Whiting would have thrown up a little in his mouth if he saw that bow.

Closest thing I can think of is a Lindenberg 22 as far as the bow is concerned.

Stern looks way too narrow for a '79

Other than the bow, the rest kind of reminds me of the old Elvstrom/Kjaerulff Half Ton of the early 70's - minus the hiking wings that were on Bes.

1127873697_MugRAcePalatka.thumb.jpg.9d3937b823d2908c6234d4de68401ed1.jpg

Bes 2018.jpg

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22 minutes ago, 12 metre said:

I think Whiting would have thrown up a little in his mouth if he saw that bow.

Closest thing I can think of is a Lindenberg 22 as far as the bow is concerned.

Stern looks way too narrow for a '79

Yea, perhaps too much even for Whiting. But compare the 3/4-tonner Riotous Assembly. Maybe something in common? Lindenberg 22 is a cool design, minitonner? Yea, the stern seems narrow for -79. Pic from Maxx Baquestae: http://www.histoiredeshalfs.com/Trois%20Quart/Riotous%2021%202.jpg 

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56 minutes ago, 12 metre said:

I think Whiting would have thrown up a little in his mouth if he saw that bow.

Closest thing I can think of is a Lindenberg 22 as far as the bow is concerned.

That kind of bow can obviously work rather OK: Chris McKillip: "In 1978 he [Mike McKillip] had placed second in the one-quarter ton North Americans located in New Orleans, and placed first in 1978 at the Mini-Ton North American in Dallas sailing a Lindenburg 22 named Sauerkraut.". see: https://gtrnews.com/son-reminisces-father-s-journey-with-ms-and-mr-bill-s-dog/

 

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On 8/5/2021 at 10:58 AM, LordBooster said:

Abelone half-tonner from -79 designed by Birger Braadland, being prepared for the HTC reunion 2023 in Norway. For sale 10:th of July 2021 "søker rette eier", according to Martin Kamperhaug. Perhaps some Whiting inspiration in the bow sections?

Kan vara en bild av jordens vatten och text där det står ”ABELONE”

Martin Kamperhaug: https://www.facebook.com/photo?fbid=4417214458303102&set=gm.506985563750883

http://www.histoiredeshalfs.com/E238.htm

 

That that thing was even allowed to race epitomizes everything that was wrong with the IOR.

How could something that bad ever get built? - it makes Cascade look like a graceful yacht.

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On 8/5/2021 at 7:58 PM, LordBooster said:

Abelone half-tonner from -79 designed by Birger Braadland, being prepared for the HTC reunion 2023 in Norway. For sale 10:th of July 2021 "søker rette eier", according to Martin Kamperhaug. Perhaps some Whiting inspiration in the bow sections?

Kan vara en bild av jordens vatten och text där det står ”ABELONE”

Martin Kamperhaug: https://www.facebook.com/photo?fbid=4417214458303102&set=gm.506985563750883

http://www.histoiredeshalfs.com/E238.htm

 

When it's 4am and all the pretty girls have already been taken home

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On 8/5/2021 at 2:39 PM, 12 metre said:

I think Whiting would have thrown up a little in his mouth if he saw that bow.

Closest thing I can think of is a Lindenberg 22 as far as the bow is concerned.

Stern looks way too narrow for a '79

Other than the bow, the rest kind of reminds me of the old Elvstrom/Kjaerulff Half Ton of the early 70's - minus the hiking wings that were on Bes.

1127873697_MugRAcePalatka.thumb.jpg.9d3937b823d2908c6234d4de68401ed1.jpg

 

I remember the first time I saw that boat at a race on the St. Johns, I asked the guy I was crewing with that was "attending" Westlawn at the time, "WTF is that?"  It just looked "right" for some reason.  Man that was a long time ago!  Neat boats!

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