randii

NY to SFO the hard way

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Wonderful news!

Y'all know that Ryan is a poster here, right?

Well, the tracker shows him in Florida near Key Largo, arriving there on December 11th. I hope everything is OK for a start from NYC on Jan 1st...

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19 hours ago, randii said:

https://www.latitude38.com/lectronic/ryan-finn-sail-proa-solo-new-york-san-francisco/

This should be a cool adventure to watch... exactly how old is Jzerro? Cool to see such a storied boat out collecting new stories!

Perhaps this will give more data on proa sails getting caught aback and blowing the mast away. :p

Randii

Haven't seen that rig before, nice.

Not sure how old she is, but between owners she has over 45000 miles on her.

Wonder if we'll have to wait for the movie for more pictures :)

 

That only actually happens in rob's fantasies

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Ryan is east of Stuart, Florida, heading north at 12 knots.  Tracker.

Ryan Finn
Dec 22, 2020, 3:23:00 PM

Track Name: Track Summary
Speed: 13.60 mph    Course: NNW
Elevation: 7.68 ft.    
Lat: 27.255706    Lon: -79.610045

ryan_fin_2020Dec22a.thumb.png.bcf7f4f12ba60386d48121f94b06617c.png

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14 minutes ago, hannibalhouse said:

Does anyone have a status report?

You can click on the tracks and see how he's doing in close to real time.  Looks like heading for harbor.  Position fixes are funny.  Says he's at negative elevation now and track summary says he reached a max elevation of 481 feet.  Gotta love GPS.

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Wonder if he'll enter the R2AK if he's going to be on the left coast anyway.

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Ryan's tracker stopped reporting yesterday afternoon (January 1st).  He was east of Cape May, NJ, ~105 Nm. from the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge, heading NNE at 14+ knots.

Jzerro_2021Jan2a.thumb.png.e4f9a6a0fd331945a341683fbe8f8b2d.png

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What was yesterday’s wx like?  While electronics can fail, this is disturbing.

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Still no change in the tracker. 
I hope he’s ok!

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10 minutes ago, Veeger said:

What was yesterday’s wx like?  While electronics can fail, this is disturbing.

Wind and wave height were moderate and favorable.  No update on his FB page.

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Looking at the specs for a Garmin inReach Explorer (assuming that is what he has), the battery life is said to be 30 days when set to 30 min interval reporting.  Ryan left on December 4 and it seems plausible that with such long battery life he just forgot about it and his battery just crapped out yesterday on Jan 1.  At least that is what I hope has happened and he is already happily tied off to a dock in NYC. 

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24 hours with no report or update?  Is there a shore team?  Where was the boat expected in NYC? 

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I arrived at Miramar Yacht Club, Brooklyn, this morning at 3 am.  Tracker was off for some reason.  Sorry about that.

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Glad to hear you made it!

Think I met you on the dock at Newport Shipyard many moons ago (pre-proa).

Give a shout if you need any semi-local help while you're up north here.

 

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Ryan posted a description of his trip north on his FB page three days ago: https://www.facebook.com/2oceans1rock/

Along with this stunning photo of Jzerro - no idea when (or how) it was taken?  Drone shot?

135090915_1757016514455329_6084451272572947646_o.thumb.jpg.a735de9ca83cb26077ff8a5f7f379247.jpg

Ryan ( @r.finn ), I hope you can keep your tracker and autopilot powered up for the whole trip.  Bon Voyage.

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On 1/2/2021 at 4:43 PM, r.finn said:

I arrived at Miramar Yacht Club, Brooklyn, this morning at 3 am.  Tracker was off for some reason.  Sorry about that.

Good luck.  Following with interest.  Be interesting to see how a proa goes relative to reasonable expectations for a similar size cat or tri.  Do you think then trip north was easier or faster due to the proa design?

 

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On 1/8/2021 at 5:39 AM, Wess said:

Good luck.  Following with interest.  Be interesting to see how a proa goes relative to reasonable expectations for a similar size cat or tri.  Do you think then trip north was easier or faster due to the proa design?

 

I think "similar size" has to be qualified. For me, we should compare proas to catamarans and trimarans of similar displacement, not necessarily of similar LWL. The "purpose" of a proa is to build the boat with the longest LWL for a given amount of material/displacement.

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I sailed on her with Russell and Richard Woods, the fun factor is off the charts, like riding a wheelie on a lightweight bike, of course there are risks. 

Ryan has some balls, and making it around has very little value in my book, but just trying makes me take off my hat.  What a great adventurer he is, and may his deeds inspire others to live their lives to the fullest .

 

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On 1/8/2021 at 3:49 AM, ProaSailor said:

Ryan posted a description of his trip north on his FB page three days ago: https://www.facebook.com/2oceans1rock/

Along with this stunning photo of Jzerro - no idea when (or how) it was taken?  Drone shot?

135090915_1757016514455329_6084451272572947646_o.thumb.jpg.a735de9ca83cb26077ff8a5f7f379247.jpg

Ryan ( @r.finn ), I hope you can keep your tracker and autopilot powered up for the whole trip.  Bon Voyage.

The photo of Jzerro at speed was taken in Key Largo by a pro cinematographer on Ryan's trip North.  One of the drone, underwater and sailing shots/video which will be in the movie after he smashes the NY SF record.  Go, man, go! 

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18 hours ago, harryproa said:

The photo of Jzerro at speed was taken in Key Largo by a pro cinematographer on Ryan's trip North.  One of the drone, underwater and sailing shots/video which will be in the movie after he smashes the NY SF record.  Go, man, go! 

Just as I thought...

now you’re using Jedi mind tricks, by not mentioning anything about your HarryProas. What kind of evil are you up to now Rob? 
:ph34r:

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18 hours ago, harryproa said:

The photo of Jzerro at speed was taken in Key Largo by a pro cinematographer on Ryan's trip North.  One of the drone, underwater and sailing shots/video which will be in the movie after he smashes the NY SF record.  Go, man, go! 

Where is the other jib in that photo?

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14 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

Where is the other jib in that photo?

Lowered to the deck, you can see it ( and it’s shadow) if you zoom in

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14 minutes ago, lakepee said:

Lowered to the deck, you can see it ( and it’s shadow) if you zoom in

I don't see a jib on the starboard bow (aft).  The jib on the port bow (forward) might be the only one that size (genoa?) and would be moved manually when shunting.

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Um how do proa people describe the pointy end of the boat? Double ended ferries have an A end and a B end. Do proa people say "go look at the forestay on the bow, I think something looks odd". "No the other bow!" 

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30 minutes ago, Zonker said:

Um how do proa people describe the pointy end of the boat? Double ended ferries have an A end and a B end. Do proa people say "go look at the forestay on the bow, I think something looks odd". "No the other bow!" 

As I just said, port now forward on port tack, starboard bow forward on starboard tack.

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On 1/7/2021 at 9:49 AM, ProaSailor said:

 

135090915_1757016514455329_6084451272572947646_o.thumb.jpg.a735de9ca83cb26077ff8a5f7f379247.jpg

 

I guess you have to learn to trim differently on a proa.  

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3 hours ago, Solarbri said:

Just as I thought...

now you’re using Jedi mind tricks, by not mentioning anything about your HarryProas. What kind of evil are you up to now Rob? 
:ph34r:

Patience, Grasshopper, all will be revealed in due course. ;-).  Until then, let's leave Harryproas out of this thread, please.

Pretty sure the genoa (J0 in modern parlance) is one of the sails Ryan built just before he left.  Nice job if so.  I think it is on a Colligo furler (Colligo is supporting him, please give them some love) and gets lowered and moved from end to end when he shunts, which will be comparatively rarely on this voyage.

The bow is the front end.  The other one is the stern.  They swap when you shunt.   The hull nearest the wind is (always) the windward hull, the other is (always) the leeward hull and the structure holding them together is the beams.  

This is only slightly different to tacking boats where the windward and leeward sides swap when you tack, but the (always) bow and the (always) stern stay the same.  

Sail trim is basically the same as any other boat with similar rig, except the headstay is offset a couple of feet or so to leeward of the mast.  ie the mast is on the windward side of the windward hull.  

North Atlantic weather looking reasonable for the next few days on Windyty, Cape Horn looking awful, as usual.    Ryan is in for a fun time, but if anyone can handle it, he can.  

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2 hours ago, harryproa said:

Sail trim is basically the same as any other boat with similar rig, except the headstay is offset a couple of feet or so to leeward of the mast.  ie the mast is on the windward side of the windward hull.   

Hey Rob, proas always confuse me but looking at the photo of Jzerro it seems to me that the mast is on the windward side of the leeward hull - can you please put me out of my misery,

 

Thanks

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Just now, Recidivist said:

Hey Rob, proas always confuse me but looking at the photo of Jzerro it seems to me that the mast is on the windward side of the leeward hull - can you please put me out of my misery,

 

Thanks

My mistake.  Sorry.  You are correct.  Too late to edit it, unfortunately.  

Pretty easy not to be miserable looking at a photo like that.  

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No question Ryan has the skill and stones for this adventure.  Does the boat?  I would probably send pizzas and a case of beer to the Argentinian Navy asking them to keep me in their thoughts.  I truly hope to be proven wrong but realistically see this ending with an EPIRB transmission.

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Jzerro has been around for a very long time and I suspect Ryan is smart enough to not take on a voyage where it is likely to end in an EPIRB transmission.

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13 hours ago, Zonker said:

Um how do proa people describe the pointy end of the boat? Double ended ferries have an A end and a B end. Do proa people say "go look at the forestay on the bow, I think something looks odd". "No the other bow!" 

I like the idea of an east and west bow. Pacific proa the ama would be north, Atlantic the main hull north. 

It'll probably never catch on, but then, neither have proas;)

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5 hours ago, Cal20sailor said:

No question Ryan has the skill and stones for this adventure.  Does the boat?  I would probably send pizzas and a case of beer to the Argentinian Navy asking them to keep me in their thoughts.  I truly hope to be proven wrong but realistically see this ending with an EPIRB transmission.

And even more so the Chilean navy. Met some of their guys in Easter Island where they check you in and out and at a meteorological station in Antarctica where they sell you souvenirs. Good guys.

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1 hour ago, ALL@SEA said:

I like the idea of an east and west bow. Pacific proa the ama would be north, Atlantic the main hull north. 

It'll probably never catch on, but then, neither have proas;)

No, the Pacific proa was developed in the Ladrone Islands, now known as the Mariana Islands, and were optimized for sailing north and south between them on the easterly trade winds.  The outrigger was therefore kept on the east side of the boat, regardless of north/south direction.

FLYING PROAS of THE LADRONE ISLANDS
by Henry Coleman Folkard, Published 1870
http://pacificproa.com/micronesia/flying_proas_of_the_Ladrone_Islands.html

Quote

The flying proa is admirably adapted to the peculiar navigation of the Ladrones, lying as they do, all of them, nearly under the same meridian and within the limits of the trade winds; and therefore vessels employed in the navigation of these islands, and in passing from one to the other, require to be especially and peculiarly well fitted for sailing with a side wind; and when we examine the uncommon simplicity and ingenuity of the construction and contrivance of the flying proa, and consider the extraordinary speed at which it sails, we shall in each of these particulars 'find it worthy of our admiration, and meriting a place amongst the mechanical productions of civilised nations where arts and sciences have most eminently flourished'.

mmariana.gif.d3cc85ce18892c37e03df1dd510291e9.gif

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Let's keep this simple. I just say Port Tack Bow or Starboard Tack Bow.

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lol, someone needs to put together a lexicon for proas, stay names get a tad confusing too, wonder what terminology the micronesians used.

 

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5 hours ago, DtM said:

Jzerro has been around for a very long time and I suspect Ryan is smart enough to not take on a voyage where it is likely to end in an EPIRB transmission.

Cape Horn eats much larger craft for breakfast,  but glad to hear Ryan is crafty, he will need it

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On 1/9/2021 at 6:30 PM, Laurent said:

I think "similar size" has to be qualified. For me, we should compare proas to catamarans and trimarans of similar displacement, not necessarily of similar LWL. The "purpose" of a proa is to build the boat with the longest LWL for a given amount of material/displacement.

Oye!  Not wanting to split hairs.  Just trying to get a real world sense of how the thing would do against a similar multi (say an F33). I am guessing the two are similar in speed from what In could tell from his track and weather conditions at the time but that is a SWAG on my part.

Has he said when he hopes to depart (weather dependent of course)?  Doesn't seem to have a router or any big sponsors so this is one heck of an impressive undertaking.

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I'll step in to answer part of the Editor's question of "WHY?".

Why a proa?

In the 2018 Regatta Al Sol, we saw the Proa Jzerro with a crew of 3 line up against a well crewed and race optimized F-31 Trimeran.  If you only looked at the polars, specs and past performance, it was not much of a race.  The Trimaran is faster upwind, faster downwind, and much faster on a reach.  With an ace crew to steer the F-31 over the 550 mile course, Jzerro's odds looked vanishingly thin.  Most figured the only way the trimaran would lose would be if they pitch-polled.

At the start, the F-31 crew hit the line at speed and led the fleet out of Pensacola bay as the U.S. Navy Blue Angels practiced their show overhead.  As soon as Jzerro cleared the required marks of the Pensacola ship channel, we raised the blades a bit, and cleared over the channel spoil area to be the first boat in the fleet to get east.  Throughout the next 20 hours of upwind sailing, the F-31 stayed ahead, and JZerro protected the east.  JZerro hit the shift first, and briefly grabbed the lead as the weather started turning nasty.

Over the next 40 hours, what became TS Alberto began to form over us.  Winds were not especially strong, but were highly variable, and seas were generally less than 2m but confused.  By daylight, the F-31 wouid make small gains.  They were unable to hit their best speeds due to the confused seas and highly variable winds.  In this condition Jzerro did not care.  She steadily ticked off 10.5 kts whether it was moderate or puffy and regardless of the seas drenching her crew.

When the sun went down, you could no longer see the waves, and steering around the occasional tall waves was not possible.  There was always a risk of taking one straight in the teeth.  The team on the F-31 made the prudent decision to throttle down reduce the risk of a big puff or big wave tripping them up.  Again, Jzerro did not give a damn.  She just kept on trucking, waves (and her crew) be damned.  Even by daylight, when sea state and wind conditions were at their most challenging, Jzerro steadily pulled distance on the F-31.

Going into the final night of the race, Jzerro held a small lead on the F-31 but conditions were beginning to moderate for those at the front of the fleet (those further back took a caneing).  Through the night, the proa gained distance again, and in the morning was able to hold off the charging trimaran to take line honors, and the handicap win from the faster boat.

In a nutshell, this is why Ryan's choice of a proa is a wise one for the 2Oceans1Rock challenge.  Where cats and trimarans have blistering speed in the proper conditions, the proa can keep on trucking in conditions where the more high performance boats would have to back down.  When conditions become untenable, a cat or trimaran would have to tow warps and a sea anchor while hand steering in order to survive, to the detriment of the health and rest of the skipper.  The proa is inherently fail-safe, and can be depowered and switch easily into "survival mode" where Ryan may be able to catch up on some sleep.

Prior roundings of the Horn on this course have almost always required a couple of days of surviving dreadful conditions off the west coast of Chile.  I believe Ryan has taken that in mind in his preparation, and he has selected the best boat that will ensure he will finish while also providing enough turn of speed in all conditions to challenge the record.

 

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1 hour ago, Wess said:

Oye!  Not wanting to split hairs.  Just trying to get a real world sense of how the thing would do against a similar multi (say an F33). I am guessing the two are similar in speed from what In could tell from his track and weather conditions at the time but that is a SWAG on my part.

Has he said when he hopes to depart (weather dependent of course)?  Doesn't seem to have a router or any big sponsors so this is one heck of an impressive undertaking.

Hi Wess,

I think an F-33 would be a lot faster than Jzerro in fair conditions, much more righting moment.  But considering the ugly conditions expected at the horn, and up the West coast of Chile, you'd need a much bigger trimaran to survive.

 

 

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46 minutes ago, Boudreaux said:

Hi Wess,

I think an F-33 would be a lot faster than Jzerro in fair conditions, much more righting moment.  But considering the ugly conditions expected at the horn, and up the West coast of Chile, you'd need a much bigger trimaran to survive.

 

 

Yea that is what I was figuring too.  Would not want to take an F33 around or near the horn unless day-sailing in settled weather.

EDIT TO ADD - Just saw your prior post.  Great info; thanks for posting that.  Curious re survival techniques in the proa.  Can you explain a bit further?

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1 hour ago, Boudreaux said:

When conditions become untenable, a cat or trimaran would have to tow warps and a sea anchor while hand steering in order to survive, to the detriment of the health and rest of the skipper.  The proa is inherently fail-safe, and can be depowered and switch easily into "survival mode" where Ryan may be able to catch up on some sleep.

No boat is fail safe in extreme conditions. However a proa simplifies the age old debate about whether it is safer to bare pole down wind trailing sea anchors and warps, or, heave to bare poled streaming sea anchors and warps off the bow because they are one and the same thing.

If the weather gods are sufficiently kind, you could sail around the Horn in a bath tub. If the weather gods are sufficiently mean, very few boats survive. You choose your risk profile, prepare your best and accept your fate......

Here is another small boat that has gone round the Horn the wrong way. A Django 25 no less. Christophe picked up his crew after the Horn They are lovely people, we met and helped them during the Covid lockdown in Tassie: https://www.mysailing.com.au/cruising/small-boat-on-a-big-sea

3666B1C7-7AE1-480B-8DFF-5C01A9923D6A.jpeg

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2 hours ago, Wess said:

Yea that is what I was figuring too.  Would not want to take an F33 around or near the horn unless day-sailing in settled weather.

EDIT TO ADD - Just saw your prior post.  Great info; thanks for posting that.  Curious re survival techniques in the proa.  Can you explain a bit further?

I can't disagree with Sidecar above.  There is no such thing as "fail safe" when we are talking about 10 meter or taller waves.  But there are features of Jzerro (and many other Brown or Bieker designed proas) that make them much more, shall we say "fault tolerant."

Three such features come to mind.  One, the rig slightly cants to leeward.  In a capsize situation, the rig will reach horizontal when the boat is heeled about 87 degrees, so overturning  moment from the sail plan is reduced.  Two, the accommodations pod, which hangs to leeward, provides significant form stability starting at about 25 degrees of heel, and increases righting moment up til about 80 degrees heel. Third, the daggarboard is in the ama.  This will allow the skipper, In survival conditions,  to lift the rudders, and leave a bit of daggarboard hanging on as a sea-anchor.  With bare poles on the wing mast, the hull and rig should have a tendency to windvane downwind while the daggarboard corrects orientation relative to the overturning force automatically.  It's eerie, like the balance you get when hove-to, but it's easy to pull out and carry on at any time.

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43 minutes ago, Boudreaux said:

I can't disagree with Sidecar above.  There is no such thing as "fail safe" when we are talking about 10 meter or taller waves.  But there are features of Jzerro (and many other Brown or Bieker designed proas) that make them much more, shall we say "fault tolerant."

Three such features come to mind.  One, the rig slightly cants to leeward.  In a capsize situation, the rig will reach horizontal when the boat is heeled about 87 degrees, so overturning  moment from the sail plan is reduced.  Two, the accommodations pod, which hangs to leeward, provides significant form stability starting at about 25 degrees of heel, and increases righting moment up til about 80 degrees heel. Third, the daggarboard is in the ama.  This will allow the skipper, In survival conditions,  to lift the rudders, and leave a bit of daggarboard hanging on as a sea-anchor.  With bare poles on the wing mast, the hull and rig should have a tendency to windvane downwind while the daggarboard corrects orientation relative to the overturning force automatically.  It's eerie, like the balance you get when hove-to, but it's easy to pull out and carry on at any time.

So left to her own devices she lies beam to the wind and seas?

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5 minutes ago, Wess said:

So left to her own devices she lies beam to the wind and seas?

well, that may be a stretch.  But with both rudders up and daggarboard down, yes.  But it won't just automatically lie ahull if you stop steering. (which I'm sure you knew, but just to be clear)

 

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17 minutes ago, Boudreaux said:

with both rudders up and daggarboard down, yes.  But it won't just automatically lie ahull if you stop steering. (which I'm sure you knew, but just to be clear)

from the section on this page titled "Just Pull..."

PARK IT, DAD by Jim Brown - Russell and Jim Brown sail proa KAURI from Bermuda to New England
Chapter 18 of Jim Brown's "Among the Multihulls, Vol. 2"
http://pacificproa.com/brown/park_it_dad.html

Quote

I had no sooner re-set the autopilot when there came a substantial increase in the breeze. Just in case there were some gusts in this new system I disconnected the autopilot and steer by hand. Hey! This was fun. KAURI was now sending up some spray, and the helm was enjoyable. I had to experiment every now and then to see which way the now bow actually turned when I pushed or pulled the now whipstaff, but just holding the thing made me feel like I was absolutely plugged into the boat. Her response was so immediate that it didn't matter much if I steered wrongly, for I could quickly send the other message and she would just as quickly alter her response. But this wind was:

Wham! Suddenly the boat is overpowered. I feather up but still the boat races ahead, the big jib drumming loudly.

Almost at once Russell bounds out of the hatch in his underwear. I am frozen to the whip staff, eyes wide and glued to the jib, doing my best to hold it on the edge of a luff. He releases the jib halyard, causing the sail to break into tympanic flogging. He crawls forward to drag the sail down. While struggling to contain it, he yells back to me, "Park it, Dad. Just park!"

Why didn't I do that to begin with? I release the main sheet and let it run all the way out, All of a sudden, everything is under control. The wind is pumping but the boat is dead in the water, not ranging ahead and jumping waves. Russ bags the jib and lashes it into the platform net, comes to the cockpit to raise the board-rudder, and finally says over the wind, "Boy, things sure picked up in a hurry"

"And it's still picking up. What do you make of these waves?"

"Well, they're sure getting steep. The wind is already blowing the tops off a little, and if it keeps increasing, against the current like this, the old "Gulp Stream" is going to stand on its head. So we'd better get ready for it."

"Don't you want to get dried off and covered up?" I ask him, noticing that he is spray-blown and shivering.

"No, the spray is warm, and I may as well get dry just once. Let's drop the boom and the mainsail right down on deck, and then set the storm jib. That way you'll be bullet proof no matter what, because I should really get some rest."

That whole section, indeed the whole page, is a great read.

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31 minutes ago, Boudreaux said:

well, that may be a stretch.  But with both rudders up and daggarboard down, yes.  But it won't just automatically lie ahull if you stop steering. (which I'm sure you knew, but just to be clear)

 

Thank you Boudreaux.

 

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3 hours ago, Boudreaux said:

Snip post # 38

  With bare poles on the wing mast, the hull and rig should have a tendency to windvane downwind while the daggarboard corrects orientation relative to the overturning force automatically.  It's eerie, like the balance you get when hove-to, but it's easy to pull out and carry on at any time.

I've used this to good effect when I've had to stop and sort out a tangle, seems to me that the ama would take a serious beating in any kind of breaking waves though.

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Ryan's FB page a link to this article which has two great photos of Jzerro at the dock.

Ryan Finn to embark on historic nonstop sail from Brooklyn to San Francisco
January 14, 2021 Richard Lubell, Special to the Brooklyn Eagle
https://brooklyneagle.com/articles/2021/01/14/ryan-finn-to-embark-on-historic-nonstop-sail-from-brooklyn-to-san-francisco/

The-Boat-of-Ryan-Finn-as-he-Prepares-for-his-Voyage-John-McCarten.1_scaled.thumb.jpg.a79bcd0d78e3a3f7fa4d41c85370b614.jpg

The-Boat-of-Ryan-Finn-as-he-Prepares-for-his-Voyage-John-McCarten.scaled.thumb.jpg.f295e078a15a61cb0346a547beca66b2.jpg

Full size, very detailed images can be found here:

http://pacificproa.com/brown/jzerro/The-Boat-of-Ryan-Finn-as-he-Prepares-for-his-Voyage-John-McCarten.1_cc.jpg

http://pacificproa.com/brown/jzerro/The-Boat-of-Ryan-Finn-as-he-Prepares-for-his-Voyage-John-McCarten.cc.jpg

It is now "mid-July" at Cape Horn...

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Ryan's tracker has finally been updated from Cape May, NJ to Brooklyn, NY (Miramar YC?).  Maybe his departure is imminent?

Offshore westerly wind is forecast through next Wednesday, making relatively flat seas near shore.  Very tricky business in January though!  Cold.

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22 hours ago, ProaSailor said:

Ryan's FB page a link to this article which has two great photos of Jzerro at the dock.

Ryan Finn to embark on historic nonstop sail from Brooklyn to San Francisco
January 14, 2021 Richard Lubell, Special to the Brooklyn Eagle
https://brooklyneagle.com/articles/2021/01/14/ryan-finn-to-embark-on-historic-nonstop-sail-from-brooklyn-to-san-francisco/

The-Boat-of-Ryan-Finn-as-he-Prepares-for-his-Voyage-John-McCarten.1_scaled.thumb.jpg.a79bcd0d78e3a3f7fa4d41c85370b614.jpg

The-Boat-of-Ryan-Finn-as-he-Prepares-for-his-Voyage-John-McCarten.scaled.thumb.jpg.f295e078a15a61cb0346a547beca66b2.jpg

Full size, very detailed images can be found here:

http://pacificproa.com/brown/jzerro/The-Boat-of-Ryan-Finn-as-he-Prepares-for-his-Voyage-John-McCarten.1_cc.jpg

http://pacificproa.com/brown/jzerro/The-Boat-of-Ryan-Finn-as-he-Prepares-for-his-Voyage-John-McCarten.cc.jpg

It is now "mid-July" at Cape Horn...

this looks crazy - mid-july is full winter here in the southern half. cape horn in winter...:blink:

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5 minutes ago, Trovão said:

this looks crazy - mid-july is full winter here in the southern half. cape horn in winter...:blink:

Full winter in the southern hemisphere?  I thought it was just the opposite.

Winter in northern hemisphere is summer in southern hemisphere, eh?  So mid-January in northern hemisphere is equivalent to "mid-July" at Cape Horn?

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2 minutes ago, ProaSailor said:

Full winter in the southern hemisphere?  I thought it was just the opposite.

Winter in northern hemisphere is summer in southern hemisphere, eh?  So mid-January in northern hemisphere is equivalent to "mid-July" at Cape Horn?

ok, you're right. my mistake. i misread the quote... in my excuse, i'd say English is not my primary language but still... the truth is i read it in a hurry.

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This is the great circle route from New York to Cape Branco, Brazil, the easternmost point in South America.  ~3,620 NM which is 15 days at 10 knots, passing east of Bermuda.  But look at the sea state just 300 NM from New York right now: 17 feet at 9 sec. intervals.  UGH!

windy_2021Jan17a.thumb.png.9c1c6f29f37eda28b8bea11a71009076.png

Wave height moderates there to 10 feet by Monday morning, but not for long.  Frequency remains brutal at 7 sec. intervals with wind W at 22 knots gusting to 32 knots.  Gusts increase to 40+ knots Tuesday night and 50+ knots Wednesday morning.  Tough choices but good practice for Cape Horn I guess, where wind, waves and temperature are similar.

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Yeah, new forecast is showing Thursday departure.  This is the only time I get to choose the weather before the clock starts, so trying to choose wisely.  

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51 minutes ago, r.finn said:

Yeah, new forecast is showing Thursday departure.  This is the only time I get to choose the weather before the clock starts, so trying to choose wisely.  

Are you doing your own routing or do you have outside help throughout the journey?

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I'm using Commanders for departure, doldrums and Cape horn approach.

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1 hour ago, r.finn said:

Yeah, new forecast is showing Thursday departure.  This is the only time I get to choose the weather before the clock starts, so trying to choose wisely.  

Best of luck from all down under

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4 hours ago, r.finn said:

Yeah, new forecast is showing Thursday departure.  This is the only time I get to choose the weather before the clock starts, so trying to choose wisely.  

Best wishes for a fast and safe trip....

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Good luck and fair winds Ryan.  Stay safe.

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10 hours ago, r.finn said:

I'm using Commanders for departure, doldrums and Cape horn approach.

Good luck for a safe journey 

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Here's the Gulf Stream now (Windy ocean currents are not forecast?).  That marker is 210 NM out.

windy_2021Jan18a.jpg.913ab4cffdb71083c0f652ab52ef52bc.jpg

Knowing that weather forecasts beyond three days or so are less and less reliable...

Wind forecast Thursday morning:

windy_2021Jan18b.jpg.c1dbe750cb1ebfce8f08a60a3ab11d28.jpg

Wind gusts Thursday morning:

windy_2021Jan18c.jpg.d643ed87be336e8e1649c1f5b41ee7e2.jpg

Waves Thursday morning:

windy_2021Jan18d.jpg.d43a85f890ba1f2bf95f95e6b2103e85.jpg

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I used Commanders on several deliveries, they are excellent.

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Ryan, you've got the Bay Area Multihull Association keeping the light on for you here in San Francisco. You will not have a bar tab in this town! Sail safe, sail smart, and Jzerro will make you a record-breaker. Godspeed, good man.

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Ryan just fired up a new track on his Garmin tracker.  Looks like he is on his way.  10 knots of speed out of the gate. He has left NY Harbor.

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11 minutes ago, Wess said:

Yup... from his facebook page...

And it is on ! The NY to SF journey has started, follow Ryan on the tracker link ! Fair winds Ryan !

~9.5kt boatspeed

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On 1/20/2021 at 12:38 AM, Ravenswing said:

Ryan, you've got the Bay Area Multihull Association keeping the light on for you here in San Francisco. You will not have a bar tab in this town! Sail safe, sail smart, and Jzerro will make you a record-breaker. Godspeed, good man.

Buy stock in Patron.

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23 minutes ago, hannibalhouse said:

15,74 mph.  Ryan is hauling freight!

Now 19.48 mph (17 knots) at Lat: 38.134725, Lon: -73.048911.  Down to 7 knots 20 minutes ago, perhaps while changing sails or snoozing?

ryan_finn_2021Jan22a.png.f920f77c2cc6cc27b3534bad13da882e.png

Waves are 6 feet at 5 secs., Wind W at 21 knots gusting to 33 knots.

https://www.windy.com/?37.975,-74.257,7,m:eIxad6m

Link to tracker without the FB id ("?fbclid=") is: https://share.garmin.com/82X63

Smart staying relatively close to shore where seas are calmer and booking due south as fast as possible.
Big blow forecast on Saturday but he should be south of Hatteras by then.

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He made about 125 nm in the first 12 hours. I bet ProaSailor is right -- head due south to stay in a (relatively) bearable seastate.  But still: air temp and water temp in the 40Fs with TWS W20 kts and boat speed south in the teens with 6 ft 6s waves from the SW. Looks reasonable to head south to Hatteras and then crack off toward the rhumb line  as the seastate allows, staying on the edge of ~ 20 knots of TWS.  Also looks like that route might give him the chance to get a boost from a eastward shot of a gulfstream gyre.

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1 hour ago, Ovakus said:

He made about 125 nm in the first 12 hours.

From the first and last waypoints on the tracker, I get these two points:  (start at 3:50 pm East coast time?)

  • Jan 21, 2021 12:50:00 PM (Pacific). Lat: 40.533811 Lon: -73.939018
  • Jan 22, 2021 8:02:00 AM (Pacific), Lat: 37.080360 Lon: -72.974990

And with this great circle calculator: https://www.gpsvisualizer.com/calculators

I get ~212 NM in the first ~19 hours?  So average speed is 11.2 knots.  That's a projected 268 NM in the first 24 hours.  Great boat Russell.

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Ryan has slowed to a crawl and jogged east.  (drifting down wind?)

ryan_finn_2021Jan22b.png.a054e811ba7373fff2553f25b7a0aa7f.png

Even if he was moving at speed, the great circle distance doesn't accurately measure actual distance traveled.

The tracker has a 'Track Summary' that should be better but I'm not sure it's accurate either?

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Hopefully just bare poles and maybe lying ahull (is that a proa thing if needing a break for a bit).  Wind is WNW so he does seem to be drifting down wind.

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This doesn't look good at all.  Two and a half hours moving slowly east and now ENE.

ryan_finn_2021Jan22c.png.84398bda0c99affc52fbc95600e2669d.png

Those two points as text, only 7.25 NM apart:

  • Jan 22, 2021 9:12:15 AM, Lat: 36.832211, Lon: -72.857273
  • Jan 22, 2021 11:43:15 AM, Lat: 36.824981, Lon: -72.706961

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Well for ENE course in that breeze the boat would seem to be under command which is a good thing.   I presume he has an EPIRB and would use it if in serious trouble.

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The stated routing plan was to get a bunch of easting early to get across Gulf Stream and help eventually clear Brazil. Perhaps it was a just a messy shunt to head east. Looks like speed is back up. 

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35 minutes ago, lakepee said:

The stated routing plan was to get a bunch of easting early to get across Gulf Stream and help eventually clear Brazil.

That's not what I heard from him in one of those videos the day before departure.  Bad weather forecast to the east and he wanted to get south ASAP to get warm, plus the offshore wind had flattened down the big waves near shore.  Where he's heading now gets gnarly Saturday afternoon.

https://www.windy.com/?37.453,-69.972,7,m:eGJad7E

Wind gusts Saturday afternoon:

windy_2021Jan23a.thumb.jpg.6b162d8760668189fedb4045eb93c316.jpg

Waves Saturday afternoon:

windy_2021Jan23b.thumb.jpg.925d27ed9f204ce86a31ae849995da1b.jpg

Compared to waves now:

windy_2021Jan22b.thumb.jpg.baaade7800d3fb606a3152d4827eacf8.jpg

The Gulf Stream could be moving him ENE right now:

windy_2021Jan22a.thumb.jpg.572eb10b3b853ecd4c33e2fc6beb05a7.jpg

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Does not look good. I hope he is OK and the boat is (more or less) OK...

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