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One of Roland Barth's "Cruising Rules" is, "Who ever uses the paint brush chooses the color." Stated another way,  It's David's money and time he so gets to develop the boat as he sees fit.

Hi Folks, We're overdue for an update from Fulcrum on Rocket production. We are finally FINALLY  making deliveries. Marathon. That moment during a launch when the cloud of smoke has built and bui

Thanks Dave! Boat arrived last weekend. It’s exactly as advertised - a complete gas that is simple, stable, and fast. Tons of fun. Kids and I love it - we’re going to put A LOT of hours on it this sum

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30 minutes ago, Will S said:

Looks fun! Anybody have more info on it?

http://www.fulcrumspeedworks.com/UFO/rocket/

Website linked above. This has been a great project for Fulcrum. We've had a record-breaking year for UFO sales, but heck man we're a for profit company and I want to pay off my mortgage and buy trinkets for my wife. How do you compliment the UFO line? Not with another foiler, we've already got a great foiler. Nope! With a great floater! The Rocket is our 2021 model year take on the great American Board Boat, of which countless different models have been made by countless companies over the years. It's a favorite for a reason.

Things you'll find familiar:
-Unthreatening pricing. $4600 with the sail and dolly. Built in Bristol RI ('merica!)
-Unthreatening usability and stability
-That massively simple lateen rig that's up and running in seconds
-Flip down rudder and easily dropped daggerboard for rapidly moving in and out of shallow water.

Things you'll find to be different:
-It's stupidly strong and about 40% lighter than you'd expect. We used really good materials and build techniques).
-HUGE full-length cockpit for your friends and stuff
-Daggerboard trunk designed to survive grounding without cutting your boat in half. 
-Deck layout that you can row from. Oarlocks and oars are seperate.
-Whacky-high level of performance, due to the reduction in weight and a couple subtle acts of care here and there. Planes upwind very consistently and shreds off the wind. I have had a stupid grin stuck to my face by this thing that didn't come off for an hour afterwards.

I would say we have decently hit our mark in creating a boat that serves the more traditional part of the market. Don't ask me if there is fleet racing. You already have all the fleet racing you need. This is an excellent toy!

Merry Christmas!

DRC

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3 minutes ago, Roller Skates said:

Any hull changes planned to interceptor/backcountry setups, or are those simply packages of accessories/buildouts that could be added?

Zero need for any hull changes. Those are just fittings. That hull is an amazing starting point for those configurations.
 

DRC

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It never stops amazing me how different the sailing market is in the USA compared to the uk . 
1) You love Sunfish.

2) You launch a boat like this with the expectation that it will sell in good numbers because there is a gap in the market . 
 

The whole thing is just beyond my comprehension but all the same I wish it all the best .

 

 

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4 minutes ago, sailwriter said:

Looks like an excellent single handed Everglades Challenge boat. Hmmmm.

...for a masochist!* 

But still cool. There is nothing wrong with a Sunfish, I love mine. Lots of fun and speed for not much $$ or complication. 

*Seven EC/UMs here. 

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I do understand the difference fast yacht, between the two but my point is in the uk there is no market for either, to be honest you couldn’t even give them away in the uk . While for you in the USA , Sunfish sell well and a manufacturer thinks he can launch a new boat of this type and think he has a great chance of making a profit . 
I am not dissing the USA sailing market just pointing out its different to the uk one .

That doesn’t mean I don’t wish Dave Clark all the best with it . 

Edited by Xeon
Mistakes
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I see that somewhere less beholden to the baggage of class system (i.e. boat class rather than upstairs downstairs) then as a glass boat at this price point this really adds up (rather than rotormould). Versatile, fun, simple - bit of retro nostalgia. No nasty smells as surround certain other mass market singlehanders. Not professing to be sailing 2.0 like other singlehanders. Very complimentary to current offering (i.e. UFO) Whats not to like?

Basically its a seagoing mazda mk1 mx5 (miata for you guys stateside).

 

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And let's not forget the vast experience in the small sailboat market (production, sales, design, technology), both in the US and out, but especially within the US, that Dave is bringing to the table. A notable person in the industry has been quoted in one way or the other "the best way to make $1 million dollars in the small sailboat industry is to spend $5 million dollars. Dave knows this very well. I think he's got yet another great boat to go with the UFO.

To all:  a great Christmas and New Years holiday!

 

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6 minutes ago, Daniel Holman said:

I see that somewhere less beholden to the baggage of class system (i.e. boat class rather than upstairs downstairs) then as a glass boat at this price point this really adds up (rather than rotormould). Versatile, fun, simple - bit of retro nostalgia. No nasty smells as surround certain other mass market singlehanders. Not professing to be sailing 2.0 like other singlehanders. Very complimentary to current offering (i.e. UFO) Whats not to like?

Basically its a seagoing mazda mk1 mx5 (miata for you guys stateside).

 

I sort of agree with Mazda comparison but to be honest it’s less Mazda mx5 ( 1980s technology) and more MG Miget/Triumph Spitfire ( late 1960s technology)  :D

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So, it's actually a good boat that is carefully disguised to look like a crap boat, which thru an accident of fate is very popular? But you can make a profit selling it cheaper than the actual crap boat?

Fuckin' brilliant. Hope it's a big success

FB- Doug

 

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12 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

So, it's actually a good boat that is carefully disguised to look like a crap boat, which thru an accident of fate is very popular? But you can make a profit selling it cheaper than the actual crap boat?

Fuckin' brilliant. Hope it's a big success

FB- Doug

 

Exactly!

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22 hours ago, Dave Clark said:

http://www.fulcrumspeedworks.com/UFO/rocket/

Website linked above. This has been a great project for Fulcrum. We've had a record-breaking year for UFO sales, but heck man we're a for profit company and I want to pay off my mortgage and buy trinkets for my wife. How do you compliment the UFO line? Not with another foiler, we've already got a great foiler. Nope! With a great floater! The Rocket is our 2021 model year take on the great American Board Boat, of which countless different models have been made by countless companies over the years. It's a favorite for a reason.

Things you'll find familiar:
-Unthreatening pricing. $4600 with the sail and dolly. Built in Bristol RI ('merica!)
-Unthreatening usability and stability
-That massively simple lateen rig that's up and running in seconds
-Flip down rudder and easily dropped daggerboard for rapidly moving in and out of shallow water.

Things you'll find to be different:
-It's stupidly strong and about 40% lighter than you'd expect. We used really good materials and build techniques).
-HUGE full-length cockpit for your friends and stuff
-Daggerboard trunk designed to survive grounding without cutting your boat in half. 
-Deck layout that you can row from. Oarlocks and oars are seperate.
-Whacky-high level of performance, due to the reduction in weight and a couple subtle acts of care here and there. Planes upwind very consistently and shreds off the wind. I have had a stupid grin stuck to my face by this thing that didn't come off for an hour afterwards.

I would say we have decently hit our mark in creating a boat that serves the more traditional part of the market. Don't ask me if there is fleet racing. You already have all the fleet racing you need. This is an excellent toy!

Merry Christmas!

DRC

I always hated the Sunfish until i used one in a (long) race on Curacao last year. This looks like more fun. The only think i do not like is the lack of a window in the sail. Great job!   

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Seems like a very smart thing to use Sunfish sail plan while redesigning that hull. They have taken the uncomfortable part of the Sunfish experience (small cockpit and limited room for two) and used a simple sail set-up with the new and improved hull.  On top of that, everyone in the US has a set of Sunfish spars sitting around in their back yard that they can use on the boat. There are also a number of people making sails for the boat so prices should remain under control. Part and fittings also look like they come from a number of manufacturers. 

If Fulcrum can keep the prices under control this may be the new boat for entry level sailors and summer camps. 

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Some stats: 
Length: 14 feet, 2 inches
Beam: 4 feet 4 inches
Draft: 2 feet 9 inches.
Hull weight: 90 pounds
Sail area: 81.37 square feet

Cockpit floor length: 6 feet 3 inches. Enough for most people to sleep in or do anything else that involves lying down. 
Sail manufacturer: North
zodiac sign: Taurus
Color options: TONS

DRC

Take a look at that picture and tell me she doesn't just look the business (Disclaimer: stern tee only sold with Interceptor package). Sales in the first 24 hours have been very strong. Step right up and get one on order.


 

IMG_5579.jpg

IMG_5577-1.jpg

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20 minutes ago, Firefly-DC said:

are you planning on setting up a class rules for OD racing or are you anticipating that owners will set that up independent of Fulcrum?  Are the sales you have seen focusing on a particular region that might set up for racing?  how many do you think you can produce per year?

Fleet racing is a side effect of successful products. Not the other way around. We will be busy building boats and selling boats. We will not be wasting any time focusing on racing, especially one design racing. We're forecasting production capacity for roughly 300 hulls in 2021, ramping to a 400 a year rate or above if needed. 

Consider why hundreds of thousands of people over the last 70 years (over half a million if you count all the board boats together) have bought board boats and continued to buy board boats in the face of a slew of other options that promise to be superior racing machines. I do not think ignorance plays a role at all. I just sold two rockets at noon to a guy on a lake in Minnesota. Racing wasn't mentioned once. Fun was. Speed was. Racing was not. One design racing definitely wasn't.

If we are successful in selling a lot of them, a portion of Rocket owners with a common interest in racing will likely race against each-other. It would definitely be very good in that application (racing), but in a world where more than half of the other boats on the market are specifically built FOR that application, I'd say it's foolish to spend much time marketing its strengths there.

DRC

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Well at that price all the used Lasers and Fish are gonna have to be $1000 or lower or no sell.  Great job Dave on Saving Sailing.  Never liked your UFO one bit and neither did couple peeps I know that owned them.  This, however, is the right boat at right time.  Do you have a foiling option?  (lol)

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30 minutes ago, JimBowie said:

 Do you have a foiling option?  (lol)

Upcoming options:


“Interceptor” Setup
-Your Rocket with afterburners
-Features Rudder T-foil for advanced planing performance and pitch control and a performance optimized rig and sail 
-Pricing TBD

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Damn!  I wish you had offered the Rocket this past spring.  Our neighbors bought an Aqua Finn this last July.  Another board boat with lateen rig and bigger cockpit than the Sunfish.   The Rocket definately looks more slippery, and every bit as easy and fun to sail.  Priced competitively, the Rocket would have been a natural fit for them, and could have kept my UFO company on the beach.   These board boats may not be the most high tech boats on the water, but they are hard to beat for simplicity and fun.    Great product Dave, I'll be sure to recommend them to people I know looking for something simple and fun.  

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1 hour ago, Kenny Dumas said:

Can you add a little overhang off the stern to catch the main sheet when you jibe?

That comes with the "Inconvenience Setup" - pricing TBD

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21 minutes ago, Bill5 said:
1 hour ago, Kenny Dumas said:

Can you add a little overhang off the stern to catch the main sheet when you jibe?

That comes with the "Inconvenience Setup" - pricing TBD

I thought it was part of the "Embarrassing Capsize When People Are Watching" option package.

FB- Doug

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Dave, thanks for answering questions in this thread. I have a few more for your:

Is the boat inn the video the "interceptor" version with enhanced rudder and sail or the standard version? How much of a difference is there with respect to the rigs? And if the "stern tee" only comes with the interceptor version how does the standard stern look like? Is it fully enclosed or fully open? Is the cockpit self-bailing?

Again, thank you.

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Just now, flyhigh said:

Dave, thanks for answering questions in this thread. I have a few more for your:

Is the boat inn the video the "interceptor" version with enhanced rudder and sail or the standard version? How much of a difference is there with respect to the rigs? And if the "stern tee" only comes with the interceptor version how does the standard stern look like? Is it fully enclosed or fully open? Is the cockpit self-bailing?

Again, thank you.

Vital clarification: "Stern tee-foil." A stern tee-foil is a small lifting a lifting foil on the rudder, pictured above. That's on the interceptor. In the above video, all the shots are of the basic layout minus the shot between 43 seconds and 48 seconds. All shots feature the basic rig. The interceptor sail is still in development. To be honest the stern tee foil is a neat toy but the boat is already a scream without it, so it was relegated to being an optional extra rather than being part of the base model. Don't get bogged down in features, the base model is the real story here. It's just plain that good. All sterns are identical. The cockpit partially self-bails but also has a suction bailer neatly nestled in it.

Cheers,

Dave

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4 hours ago, Kenny Dumas said:

Cool boat. The few lateen rigs I’ve played with were problematic in high winds to weather. Obvious issue with keeping the sail flat /  depowering.   

I've been shocked by how well it behaves in a big breeze. I've had it out in 20 knots gusting to 30 and the low center of pressure on the crab-claw along with the foot of the sail very nearly endplating to the water reminds me of all the work we do on foilers getting the drive to happen down low without heeling moment. It just grinds it out and keeps pushing and planing. Twist is also a pretty obvious depowering maneuver dictated by changing  where you have the halyard tied on and the intersection of the gooseneck. There are more tunable rigs. The UFO rig has a ridiculously broad gearbox ranging from "Spinnaker" to "sheet of paper" with a whole codex of spar responses as well. This isn't that, but I don't think for this use case it's really needed. 

DRC

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On 12/21/2020 at 10:37 AM, Dave Clark said:

http://www.fulcrumspeedworks.com/UFO/rocket/

Website linked above. This has been a great project for Fulcrum. We've had a record-breaking year for UFO sales, but heck man we're a for profit company and I want to pay off my mortgage and buy trinkets for my wife. How do you compliment the UFO line? Not with another foiler, we've already got a great foiler. Nope! With a great floater! The Rocket is our 2021 model year take on the great American Board Boat, of which countless different models have been made by countless companies over the years. It's a favorite for a reason.

I would say we have decently hit our mark in creating a boat that serves the more traditional part of the market. Don't ask me if there is fleet racing. You already have all the fleet racing you need. This is an excellent toy!

Merry Christmas!

DRC

Dave small boats are the best boats, and small monos are the best small boats, and small planing or foiling monos are the best small monos.  Great to see a new one in the world.  I've been sailing a modified Expedition 14.5 for over 20 years.  Everything you say about what a fun boat needs is true.  But if you are going to offer a touring or step-up model on the same hull, I would suggest: 

- A rig like a Hobie Adventure Island.  Freestanding & rotating. Repurposed windsurf spar or even cheap aluminum Festivus pole.  Boomless sail with vertical battens. Or a Hoyt Boom if a license is reasonable- If you REALLY want to go dead downwind- which is hardly ever critical in fun mode.  The ability to reef on the fly to adjust for any wind and load, and stow the sail away in situ and out of the cockpit is a huge huge huge advantage.   Reefed upwind in a strong breeze and unfurled fully for the reach/run home is big grins without the anxiety of being overcanvassed- experienced sailor or not.  Hobie sells a huge number of  seven thousand dollar rotomolded sailing kayaks for a reason.  

- A molded or fabricated mount for a trolling motor.  Sometimes there ain't no wind or the best launching spot is not great for sailing or there is just enough wind that a trolling motor makes a very pleasant motorsail out of an otherwise crap day.   Likewise a molded tray or strap to hold a standard-sized 35AH battery.  That's plenty for this purpose.  A little electric motor is a simple way to make a small boat a lot more enjoyable. 

- If you are going to do a row option- getting that spar and sail up out of the way is good- I would do it facing backward on a fixed molded seat at the centerboard trunk,  with the oarlocks on aluminum riggers and some nice mirrors built-in to the 'riggers.  People serious about rowing or sail adventure will happily pay extra, and with this boat's mass and low wetted surface it could likely be a rower in a non-trivial way.  The fitness market is red, red, red hot too so this boat could replace a kayak in that role.   

Hope you sell many boats and pay 'dem bills! 



 

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@Dave Clark, I've spent what little free time I have this past year getting a 40 year old Force 5 up and running.  Now you have me thinking that I need to order another boat...Thank you for making these decisions hard for us.  This is the boat I'm most excited about.  It looks just about perfect for taking my kids out and mucking about in boats.  I had resolved myself to buying the short rig for my force 5 to help them learn, but now...I have some conversations with the wife ahead of me.

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1 hour ago, bluelaser2 said:

Dave small boats are the best boats, and small monos are the best small boats, and small planing or foiling monos are the best small monos.  Great to see a new one in the world.  I've been sailing a modified Expedition 14.5 for over 20 years.  Everything you say about what a fun boat needs is true.  But if you are going to offer a touring or step-up model on the same hull, I would suggest: 

- A rig like a Hobie Adventure Island.  Freestanding & rotating. Repurposed windsurf spar or even cheap aluminum Festivus pole.  Boomless sail with vertical battens. Or a Hoyt Boom if a license is reasonable- If you REALLY want to go dead downwind- which is hardly ever critical in fun mode.  The ability to reef on the fly to adjust for any wind and load, and stow the sail away in situ and out of the cockpit is a huge huge huge advantage.   Reefed upwind in a strong breeze and unfurled fully for the reach/run home is big grins without the anxiety of being overcanvassed- experienced sailor or not.  Hobie sells a huge number of  seven thousand dollar rotomolded sailing kayaks for a reason.  

- A molded or fabricated mount for a trolling motor.  Sometimes there ain't no wind or the best launching spot is not great for sailing or there is just enough wind that a trolling motor makes a very pleasant motorsail out of an otherwise crap day.   Likewise a molded tray or strap to hold a standard-sized 35AH battery.  That's plenty for this purpose.  A little electric motor is a simple way to make a small boat a lot more enjoyable. 

- If you are going to do a row option- getting that spar and sail up out of the way is good- I would do it facing backward on a fixed molded seat at the centerboard trunk,  with the oarlocks on aluminum riggers and some nice mirrors built-in to the 'riggers.  People serious about rowing or sail adventure will happily pay extra, and with this boat's mass and low wetted surface it could likely be a rower in a non-trivial way.  The fitness market is red, red, red hot too so this boat could replace a kayak in that role.   

Hope you sell many boats and pay 'dem bills! 



 

Noted, and thank you for the input. We do disagree for a variety of factors related to value for money. In general I'm allergic to design choices that step outside of minimalism and utilitarianism. We're able to achieve process excellence is a seriously vertically integrated company because of it and meet our market. 

DRC

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"minimalism and utilitarianism"  word salad when they mean only what you want them to mean. 

Sure, skip outriggers for the oars. 

But a lateeen is a pain in the ass compared to a furling mainsail.   Single spar with sleeved sail is easier to rig, easier to sail, easier to derig, stays out of the way and out of the cockpit when not in use (the "fun" in a fun boat)  and will go a lot faster upwind because of the horrendous induced drag of the lateen aspect ratio.

And adding a chunk of wood and an eyestrap  for a motor & battery mount would stress your process excellence?       mmmmkaaay. 

They can't make eBikes fast enough to meet demand.  A little "fun" boat with no auxiliary propulsion is only fun for skilled sailors.  You heard it here first.   Go sail a Hobie Island if you want to see how to make non-sailors pony up.  



 

20201006_182827(0).jpg

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18 minutes ago, bluelaser2 said:

"minimalism and utilitarianism"  word salad when they mean only what you want them to mean. 

Sure, skip outriggers for the oars. 

But a lateeen is a pain in the ass compared to a furling mainsail.   Single spar with sleeved sail is easier to rig, easier to sail, easier to derig, stays out of the way and out of the cockpit when not in use (the "fun" in a fun boat)  and will go a lot faster upwind because of the horrendous induced drag of the lateen aspect ratio.

And adding a chunk of wood and an eyestrap  for a motor & battery mount would stress your process excellence?       mmmmkaaay. 

They can't make eBikes fast enough to meet demand.  A little "fun" boat with no auxiliary propulsion is only fun for skilled sailors.  You heard it here first.   Go sail a Hobie Island if you want to see how to make non-sailors pony up.  



 

20201006_182827(0).jpg

Especially in the middle of a product launch, I’m very sure of and proud of the design choices we have made. Rather than debate what is and isn’t a good choice for the ongoing  job security and professional advancement of myself and my employees, I intend to prove the validity of our choices by building, selling and delivering Rockets.

One point: board boats are statistically the best example of a sailboat that sells to non-sailors. My mother’s family were middle class non sailors. They learned to sail on a Sailfish. It is one step more complicated than a paddle board.

 

DRC

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I never designed a boat that made it to production, but I have to disagree with 40% of your design choices ...

I never marketed and sold a boat, but I'm sure that I know what the market wants better than you ...

I never managed boat building operation, but I know that my ideas are easy to implement ...

I have never seen your operation, but I'm positive that the changes I'm suggesting will improve your efficiency ...

Oh yeah.  I almost forgot.  If the QB had just done what I would have done, we would have won that game on Sunday.  Everybody could see that what I came up while watching the replay at home would have worked...

 

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First and foremost, kudo's to you and everyone at Fulcrum from doing what looks like a very nice update of the classic American board boat-can't wait to see what it looks like in person.  What you have done with the UFO and also your Dad's accomplishments going back to the Little AC and beyond speaks for itself. I consider you and your dad nothing less than talented and brilliant, both boats were very well thought out.

A few questions/thoughts.  I really enjoyed the about 25 minute you tube vid you did of rigging the UFO, it answered a lot of questions in my mind about the boat.  I know you are super busy but any chance you could do similar with the Rocket.  I see two benefits to this.  One again it would give a good overall look at the boat answering things like what to the blades look like, transom/rudder/tiller arrangement, etc.  Two you mention the non sailor in the family being brought into the sport by a board boat.  Am thinking if a non sailor saw such a vid (am maybe even like you did with the UFO a short vid of first sail tips/tricks) that this might help draw non sailors into the boat/sport, "Sunfish Simple" I believe is the phrase you use.

Final question is the rig pretty close to the Sunfish size?  Reason I ask is Harken Canvas for example makes a really nice top gun bag for the Sunfish that fits both boom, mast, rigging etc. into the bag for transport.  Would be cool if Rocket rig/sails would fit into same bag and again not sure if thing like existing foil bags for the Sunfish would also work with the Rocket.

Either way wishing you a good holiday season and upcoming 2021.  Thanks for taking the time to respond to all these posts which I know is time consuming.

 

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3 hours ago, bluelaser2 said:

"minimalism and utilitarianism"  word salad when they mean only what you want them to mean. 

Sure, skip outriggers for the oars. 

But a lateeen is a pain in the ass compared to a furling mainsail.   Single spar with sleeved sail is easier to rig, easier to sail, easier to derig, stays out of the way and out of the cockpit when not in use (the "fun" in a fun boat)  and will go a lot faster upwind because of the horrendous induced drag of the lateen aspect ratio.

And adding a chunk of wood and an eyestrap  for a motor & battery mount would stress your process excellence?       mmmmkaaay. 

They can't make eBikes fast enough to meet demand.  A little "fun" boat with no auxiliary propulsion is only fun for skilled sailors.  You heard it here first.   Go sail a Hobie Island if you want to see how to make non-sailors pony up.  



 

20201006_182827(0).jpg

If you have ever used a lateen sail on a sunfish or the like, then you’re definitely doing it wrong if you find it complicated.  Among other things, I love my Sunfish because I pull one string and and sail is up and ready to go.  Less than 5 minutes from my door to blast reaching across the lake.  This is by far the simplest rigging operation that On any boat of mine, and as a result I use it a lot!  

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Hobie Hobie Adventure Island  are well-designed. I've looked them over up close. I've watched them sail in person and come into the ramp and unrig. I've talked to people who sail them. The rig is clever and nicely designed and works. I am forever mad at myself for not inventing the hobie drive. That thing is brilliant.

There is nothing wrong with that. But they are kayaks. As in you are in a kayak. Not on a boat. Different thing. Heck there isn't even a tiller. (Heaven's to Betsy! WHAT?!)

But, loose footed mainsails on monohulls suck. Unless you are on the wind they never set well. The hobie has a pedal. So when they slow down they pedal...lol. And being speedy multi in a nice breeze they could tack downwind. Except again they have a pedal...lol (again).

I've sailed quite a few loose footed mainsal boats. From a range of traditional wooden boats up through a 30 foot pulling boat. A boom is a very useful invention. Trimming loose footed sails downwind is no end of frustration and lack of useful energy. "If only I had a boom, this thing would work!). I once got a hobie wave to fly a hull. I took Human Vang / Boom to make that happen.

Now, final point: there's nothing stopping anyone from putting a loosefooted rig on the boat. You can do whatever. There's a hole. You drop in the hole. Fulcrum already sells carbon sticks. I'm sure if someone wants to put a loose-footed sail on, it will be facilitated. Again, you can rig whatever you want. It isn't a laser ("YOU CANT DO THAT IT IS AGAINST THE LAW!").

As for the trolling motor. That is just (___).  I have NEVER seen a trolling motor on a hobie. Enough said. BTW, the first person to cross the Atlantic on a folding kayak did it before the War. Then he got to one of the caribbean islands and bought a small outboard and figured out how to get it mounted. He set out for Florida and was Never Seen Again. (yeah there was a Hurricane that showed up too. Bad juju putting outboard on a kayak).

Trolling motors are slower and dumber than two pieces of Eastern Red Spruce. And they foul the mainsheet. (Duh.)

 

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Core  is very very trick thermoplastic honeycomb which is finished in a way that permits infusion.  Totally game changing.  Result is that there are no foam blocks or anything else inside.  The hull is stiffer than any board boat I have ever seen.Having a longer cockpit also helps because the cockpit sides act like a full height girders. 

The gooseneck is indeed a loop of spectra. Works perfectly, no fizzing like between the aluminum spars and the bronze fitting. The boat is also equipped with a gooseneck downhaul which is cleated next to the halyard in the center of the spray rail.  Sunfish racers know that pulling the gooseneck down is like pulling on the vang.  But in this case you don’t have to use the tail of the halyard..  We are still finalizing the detail that permits fore and aft adjustment of the goosenecks position on the boom. This and where you tie the halyard to the gaff are the big tuning variables.  You can do a lot.  The upshot is that light people can rip around when it is really hooting. Or you can have more space under the boom for your sweetheart.

Gaff and Boom are slightly longer than Sunfish. Don’t have the exact number on top of my head.

SHC

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Dave, Great concept and product! Virtually all of the naysayers seem to display their own ignorance when it comes to the boat or the rig. I spent many enjoyable hours on a Sunfish as a teen in Miami. Everything you say about the Rocket is correct. Not easy to do but you seem to have succeeded in a significant update on one of the best small boat concepts ( board boat ) ever developed. Glad you had the guts to push ahead. Best of Luck!

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On 12/24/2020 at 12:26 PM, PurpleOnion said:

I never designed a boat that made it to production, but I have to disagree with 40% of your design choices ...

I never marketed and sold a boat, but I'm sure that I know what the market wants better than you ...

I never managed boat building operation, but I know that my ideas are easy to implement ...

I have never seen your operation, but I'm positive that the changes I'm suggesting will improve your efficiency ...

Oh yeah.  I almost forgot.  If the QB had just done what I would have done, we would have won that game on Sunday.  Everybody could see that what I came up while watching the replay at home would have worked...

 

Uh huh.  I've spent thousands of days on small boats.  I currently own and use five boats under 20 feet.  I've had to make payroll for almost a quarter century in a competitive little corner of the tech world.  I've launched products.  I've taken advice and given it.   I don't give a rat's ass if my advice is appreciated or not, but I know beyond a shadow of a doubt that if you want to sell small boats for fun to a wider audience than the well-saturated niche of experienced board boat sailors you better have two cardinal features: adjustable sail area and auxiliary propulsion.   You don't have those things, you don't have enough capability for the way more people are able to have fun.   Hobie Islands have those things and they are the most successful small boats, by far, that I know of since the original Laser. 

As to - purity of not having a trolling motor.  It's bullshit.  They are handy and 24 pound thrust weighs about 5 pounds.  If the mount is factory and there is a place for smallish 12v battery, it will sell boats.  

As to - no boom on a monohull.  Hobie Islands manage it sheeting from the centerline.  Potato chip downwind, not pretty.  A Hoyt boom is terrific for small boats and self-stores for travel.  NOTHING faster to rig than dropping one spar, with sail already bent and ready, into a hole and clipping a sheet on. 

I offered suggestions for downstream models.  Products that sell often don't look at all like the starting vision.  I'm not attacking shit including the original design choices.  If you take advice as attack,  it makes it harder. 

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2 hours ago, bluelaser2 said:

Uh huh.  I've spent thousands of days on small boats.  I currently own and use five boats under 20 feet.  I've had to make payroll for almost a quarter century in a competitive little corner of the tech world.  I've launched products.  I've taken advice and given it.   I don't give a rat's ass if my advice is appreciated or not, but I know beyond a shadow of a doubt that if you want to sell small boats for fun to a wider audience than the well-saturated niche of experienced board boat sailors you better have two cardinal features: adjustable sail area and auxiliary propulsion.   You don't have those things, you don't have enough capability for the way more people are able to have fun.   Hobie Islands have those things and they are the most successful small boats, by far, that I know of since the original Laser. 

As to - purity of not having a trolling motor.  It's bullshit.  They are handy and 24 pound thrust weighs about 5 pounds.  If the mount is factory and there is a place for smallish 12v battery, it will sell boats.  

As to - no boom on a monohull.  Hobie Islands manage it sheeting from the centerline.  Potato chip downwind, not pretty.  A Hoyt boom is terrific for small boats and self-stores for travel.  NOTHING faster to rig than dropping one spar, with sail already bent and ready, into a hole and clipping a sheet on. 

I offered suggestions for downstream models.  Products that sell often don't look at all like the starting vision.  I'm not attacking shit including the original design choices.  If you take advice as attack,  it makes it harder. 

The problem with people like you is that it's so much easier to write than to do. Dave (and Steve) have the courage of their convictions and more than a little bit of experience and they are prepared to back that with their own cash. You are happy to hide behind a made up name on a forum, with zero skin in the game and offer "advice" based on little more than having sailed and owned sailboats. It appears you are so tone deaf that you don't realise that your unsolicited "advise" is badly phrased and very arrogant. I doubt Dave and Steve mind people giving feedback, but you think you are above that and believe you are capable of advising them. Even if you did have some valid points, I would keep well away from somebody with such a poor attitude.

Good luck, Dave (and Steve). You seem to have done pretty well out of following your own beliefs of what there is a market for and I am sure you will be rewarded for yet again having the courage of your convictions. Only bad news I can foresee is that from everything I know about boat building, another successful product will mean even less spare time, less sailing and no holidays. I hope you get what you deserve!!

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@bluelaser2 Congrats on success in the tech industry. Hardware isn't software. Hardware is actually, as the name suggests, hard. 

I launched products on both sw and hw worlds. Software is so malleable that we have an established culture of making strongly worded suggestions. Hey, could be a feature in the next update.

Hardware is different. It's so much harder that while yes, you can take an attitude of blameless suggestions... it's just not helpful. David has clearly picked a particular market segment as is going for it.

Anyway, you can do whatever you want, I'm just explaining the pushback.

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On 12/25/2020 at 5:09 AM, Dave Clark said:

Especially in the middle of a product launch, I’m very sure of and proud of the design choices we have made. Rather than debate what is and isn’t a good choice for the ongoing  job security and professional advancement of myself and my employees, I intend to prove the validity of our choices by building, selling and delivering Rockets.

My expertise - and expert advice.

I've been kicking around small boats for over 40 years. 

While I've learned a bit over the years, it is mostly about racing - and less about the business of small boat manufacturing.

I know one thing - when Dave Clark (and a select few others) bother to write shite here - to me it is the voice of experience - and I'm learning by listening to what they say. I'm not saying they have everything perfect or the sun shines out of their you-know-where, but what I am saying is that through their efforts like the UFO and now the rocket, more people are spending more time getting pushed around in boats by wind on water - and so far as I'm concerned, that's an exceedingly good thing for our sport/hobby/pastime.

So in the scale of things - I know that I'm no expert and know enough to know that Dave Clark (and a select few others) are.

Well done with the Rocket. :) 

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19 hours ago, bluelaser2 said:


As to - no boom on a monohull.  Hobie Islands manage it sheeting from the centerline.  Potato chip downwind, not pretty.  A Hoyt boom is terrific for small boats and self-stores for travel.  NOTHING faster to rig than dropping one spar, with sail already bent and ready, into a hole and clipping a sheet on. 

Again... you clearly have never used a lateen rig before.  

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4 hours ago, Bruce Hudson said:

....

So in the scale of things - I know that I'm no expert and know enough to know that Dave Clark (and a select few others) are.

Well done with the Rocket. :) 

Agreed!

I can see and agree with BluLaser... outside of the context of discussing the Fulcrum Rocket.... about practical preferences in small boat configuration & rigging. But basically, here he's complaining that a cow isn't a horse. You pick which you want, depending on whether you're gonna ride or get milk.

I happen to like boats with marconi rigs and centerboards and raised cockpit floors so that water runs right out. Those features impose certain design characteristics on a boat that are not so good, especially in smaller boats.

The Rocket also doesn't have a trapeze or an asymmetric spinnaker or a wave-piercing bow etc etc etc.

FB- Doug

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Really like the idea of a Phantom with a new cockpit, great price point. Already recommended this to my brother.

Just not sure that I agree with Steve that it's really a crab claw.

Good job and good luck. Tough economy so be patient, thanks for staying local.

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fastyacht "As for the trolling motor. That is just (___).  I have NEVER seen a trolling motor on a hobie. Enough said"

Yea, well you don't know WTF what you are talking about, which handily does not dent your certainty.   

Thousands of Hobie Islands have been sold, and hundreds, if not into the thousands, have been motorized, with both trolling  motors and gas outboards. 

https://www.hobie.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=71&t=58926&hilit=motor+mount

SimonN

You are happy to hide behind a made up name on a forum, 

My name is Martin Snyder, and I don't have shit to hide from sailors on social media (!)    What are you hiding Simon? 

 "It appears you are so tone deaf that you don't realise that your unsolicited "advise" is badly phrased and very arrogant. I doubt Dave and Steve mind people giving feedback, but you think you are above that and believe you are capable of advising them. Even if you did have some valid points, I would keep well away from somebody with such a poor attitude"

My original post was plenty nice.  Dave apparently has a bit of an attitude, and I was merely matching my interlocutor.  Tone police have a thankless job.  

martin 'hoff

Hardware is different. It's so much harder that while yes, you can take an attitude of blameless suggestions... it's just not helpful. 

Another wisenheimer spouting bullshit that sounds right- but is nonsense.   Software ain't easy and it aint as malleable  as say.... a sheet of dacron and some skinny aluminum poles.  The "easy" part keeps wasting Boeing's expensive hardware, among many other examples of software being so fuckin' easy.  

The point I was making is that aux propulsion and adjustable sail area are critical items for mass sales of "fun" sailboats.  I'll be happy to be wrong about that, but I won't be. 

As to entrepreneurs and their attitudes?  When they can't kill their babies, or brook dissent with their choices, or explore ideas that they personally find distasteful, they are just indulging themselves.  Nobody is against that, but don't put shit up on these boards to sell your dream  and not expect some direct response. 

Steve Jobs being the iconic exception, very rarely is business success- from modest to vast-  the result of one person's vision or drive. It's almost always a  happy combination of several leaders adapted to the task,  the right feedback between customers and products, and the ability to change with the times.   

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Are we seeing the advance release of the 2021 trolling motor?

On reducable sail area. Thatviscone of thiose strange facts. Rarely seen im small boats  wven though easy to do.

Windsurfrrs change rigs

Lasere change rigs

505 rake and flatten

Sunfish flatten and luff.

Thistles capsize or break masts

In 70s we reefed laser with a wrap. Sail sjape not so good.

East coast rarely more than 15 knots in season.

All sorts of thimgs.

Most importantly. Rigging is easily changed. Hulls not.

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Fulcrum have put together a wonderfully attractive update to the board boat with an obvious emphasis on sailing. I highly doubt the Hobie kayak or electric bike were in their thought process at any stage of the game. Totally different beast and market. And I don’t care what you say @bluelaser2 , those furling mains look like shit. Be they on a Beneteau 49 or your beloved Hobie kayak, they are ugly and a compromise. And a motor? Pick another boat. Please. This isn’t a Swiss Army knife, or a MacGyver creation. It’s an update to a board boat. And a nice one. 

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37 minutes ago, Martin T said:

Why can't people except the Rocket for what it is?

A small fun simple sailing dinghy... sound familiar, Laser in the 70's & that didn't catch on...LOL

Judging from our sales, the majority of people are embracing it for its simple virtues. Don't expect to see me around doing the dog and pony show that much. I'm going to be very busy for a while.


DRC

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3 hours ago, Dave Clark said:

Judging from our sales, the majority of people are embracing it for its simple virtues. Don't expect to see me around doing the dog and pony show that much. I'm going to be very busy for a while.


DRC

Cool boat; crazy off track thread.  Good luck with it Dave.  Is the mast receptacle the same design and measurements as the UFO? Some cost efficiencies for you and flexibility for owners of both...

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37 minutes ago, Wess said:

Cool boat; crazy off track thread.  Good luck with it Dave.  Is the mast receptacle the same design and measurements as the UFO? Some cost efficiencies for you and flexibility for owners of both...

See #52

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